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Sixth Amendment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1986
U.S. Attorney Bonner goes his boss, Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, one better in suggesting only those who can afford it are entitled to protection of the Sixth Amendment and a litmus test for the lawyers of those who can't. LOUIS M. ST. MARTIN Pomona
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | ERWIN CHEMERINSKY, Erwin Chemerinsky is a law professor at USC. and
Perhaps more than any other case in American history, the O.J. Simpson murder trial is forcing constant examination of the tension between protecting a free press and guaranteeing a fair trial. This has been especially evident in developments of the past week. Judge Lance A. Ito suspended jury selection for two days to focus on whether a new book about Nicole Brown Simpson compromises O.J. Simpson's right to a fair trial.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1992
Re Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi on decriminalizing narcotics: "Does not the First Amendment allow ads and marketing?" he asks. No, Mr. Capizzi, it does not. It allows freedom to speak against the government in word or print. Absence of that right allows, as in Russia under communism, dissidents to be jailed, exiled to Siberia, or to vanish forever. Also, Mr. Capizzi, it is not the Miranda rule that gives suspects the right to legal counsel, it is the Sixth Amendment, which orders a defense counsel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1992
Re Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi on decriminalizing narcotics: "Does not the First Amendment allow ads and marketing?" he asks. No, Mr. Capizzi, it does not. It allows freedom to speak against the government in word or print. Absence of that right allows, as in Russia under communism, dissidents to be jailed, exiled to Siberia, or to vanish forever. Also, Mr. Capizzi, it is not the Miranda rule that gives suspects the right to legal counsel, it is the Sixth Amendment, which orders a defense counsel.
NEWS
July 22, 1990
Robert W. Stewart quotes Dannemeyer's press secretary, Paul Mero, as saying, "To us, it's those who believe in a God against those who don't." This echoes what Dannemeyer wrote in a Times Op-Ed piece on Nov. 8, 1981: "The First Amendment provides freedom for religion. The modern interpretation for absolute freedom from religion is erroneous and logically impossible." And what the head of his party, then-Vice President George Bush, told a Chicago airport press conference in August, 1987: "I don't know that atheists should be considered as citizens, nor should they be considered as patriots.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victims in child abuse cases may testify without actually appearing in court and directly confronting those they accuse, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, upholding laws in at least 25 states--including California--designed to protect child witnesses from trauma.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police officers may ask a drunk-driving suspect to answer routine questions and videotape his slurred responses without warning him of his constitutional right to remain silent, the Supreme Court said Monday. The 8-1 decision creates an exception to the Miranda doctrine for "routine booking questions" at a police station. The ruling also upholds the growing use by the police of videotape, which can be a powerful weapon for prosecutors.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas may be showing the first signs of being a conservative hard-liner ready to sharply restrict the protections of the Constitution. In a little noticed concurring opinion filed this week, Thomas joined the Bush Administration and Justice Antonin Scalia in urging a new approach to limiting a defendant's ability to confront his accusers in court, a traditional right set forth in the Constitution.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, in its first ruling upholding so-called rape-shield laws, said Monday that a rape suspect does not have an absolute constitutional right to tell a jury about an earlier sexual relationship with his accuser. In the 1970s, nearly every state enacted laws to forbid court testimony that exposed the private life of a rape victim. Women's rights advocates had complained that rape suspects tried to save themselves by ruining the reputations of their victims.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr. refused to answer questions today from a House panel investigating housing scandals, invoking his Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights. He contended that he had been "prejudged by this body." Pierce, compelled to appear by a subpoena, accused the subcommittee of trying to rush him into testifying without adequate preparation and said he hopes to tell his story later.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas may be showing the first signs of being a conservative hard-liner ready to sharply restrict the protections of the Constitution. In a little noticed concurring opinion filed this week, Thomas joined the Bush Administration and Justice Antonin Scalia in urging a new approach to limiting a defendant's ability to confront his accusers in court, a traditional right set forth in the Constitution.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Thursday reaffirmed the power of states to restrict what criminal defense lawyers may say about their clients and the charges they face. By a 5-4 vote, the court ruled that a lawyer's normal free speech rights are outweighed by the danger of a "substantial likelihood of material prejudice" to a fair trial.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, in its first ruling upholding so-called rape-shield laws, said Monday that a rape suspect does not have an absolute constitutional right to tell a jury about an earlier sexual relationship with his accuser. In the 1970s, nearly every state enacted laws to forbid court testimony that exposed the private life of a rape victim. Women's rights advocates had complained that rape suspects tried to save themselves by ruining the reputations of their victims.
NEWS
July 22, 1990
Robert W. Stewart quotes Dannemeyer's press secretary, Paul Mero, as saying, "To us, it's those who believe in a God against those who don't." This echoes what Dannemeyer wrote in a Times Op-Ed piece on Nov. 8, 1981: "The First Amendment provides freedom for religion. The modern interpretation for absolute freedom from religion is erroneous and logically impossible." And what the head of his party, then-Vice President George Bush, told a Chicago airport press conference in August, 1987: "I don't know that atheists should be considered as citizens, nor should they be considered as patriots.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victims in child abuse cases may testify without actually appearing in court and directly confronting those they accuse, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, upholding laws in at least 25 states--including California--designed to protect child witnesses from trauma.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police officers may ask a drunk-driving suspect to answer routine questions and videotape his slurred responses without warning him of his constitutional right to remain silent, the Supreme Court said Monday. The 8-1 decision creates an exception to the Miranda doctrine for "routine booking questions" at a police station. The ruling also upholds the growing use by the police of videotape, which can be a powerful weapon for prosecutors.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, limiting the rights of defendants to contest the fairness of their juries, ruled Monday that prosecutors may continue to remove potential jurors because of their profession, religion, gender or ethnic background. On a 5-4 vote, the court said that a defendant's constitutional right to a fair trial does not flatly prohibit a prosecutor from excluding members of any specific group from the jury. One exception to this rule still stands.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Thursday reaffirmed the power of states to restrict what criminal defense lawyers may say about their clients and the charges they face. By a 5-4 vote, the court ruled that a lawyer's normal free speech rights are outweighed by the danger of a "substantial likelihood of material prejudice" to a fair trial.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision that could bolster prosecution of defense fraud cases, a federal district judge in Los Angeles ruled that the Northrop Corp. cannot prevent Justice Department lawyers from interviewing company workers outside the presence of Northrop lawyers. U.S. Circuit Judge Pamela A. Rymer said in a decision released Friday that Northrop had failed to show that its constitutional rights would be violated by such interviews.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, limiting the rights of defendants to contest the fairness of their juries, ruled Monday that prosecutors may continue to remove potential jurors because of their profession, religion, gender or ethnic background. On a 5-4 vote, the court said that a defendant's constitutional right to a fair trial does not flatly prohibit a prosecutor from excluding members of any specific group from the jury. One exception to this rule still stands.
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