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Sixto Perez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, honesty does pay. Consider Sixto Perez, the impoverished 12-year-old from La Puente who was honored Tuesday for turning down $100 to sell drugs. His story, reported in The Times, struck a responsive chord that prompted more than 350 people to call and pledge money, food and clothing. "My heart really goes out to this boy," said Iris Wexler of Burbank, who said she is on a fixed income but plans to send $5 and a card.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All the TV cameras have gone away. The tinned food, used clothes and checks have stopped arriving. Six months after being feted nationwide for turning down $100 offered by a drug dealer to sell crack cocaine, Sixto Perez, now 12, is back to reality in the La Puente trailer he shares with his parents and five siblings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992
Sixto Perez, 12, often goes hungry. His family is so poor that lunch frequently is nothing except tortillas. He lives with his mother and five sisters and brothers in a crowded trailer in La Puente. They are not on welfare. Sixto makes a few dollars helping at a neighborhood store; his older brother also works. His father, a farm worker, sends money whenever he can. Despite the grinding poverty, the sixth-grader said no to selling drugs.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing could have prepared Sixto Perez for the white stretch limousine that rolled up to his La Puente trailer home last month to whisk him off to Hollywood to appear on "The Arsenio Hall Show." Teachers say Sixto, 12, often lived on his free school lunches. His father, a migrant farm worker, sporadically sent home money to the family of six children. The boy did odd jobs after school to help buy milk and tennis shoes for his little brother.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing could have prepared Sixto Perez for the white stretch limousine that rolled up to his La Puente trailer home last month to whisk him off to Hollywood to appear on "The Arsenio Hall Show." Teachers say Sixto, 12, often lived on his free school lunches. His father, a migrant farm worker, sporadically sent home money to the family of six children. The boy did odd jobs after school to help buy milk and tennis shoes for his little brother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All the TV cameras have gone away. The tinned food, used clothes and checks have stopped arriving. Six months after being feted nationwide for turning down $100 offered by a drug dealer to sell crack cocaine, Sixto Perez, now 12, is back to reality in the La Puente trailer he shares with his parents and five siblings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be hard to imagine a child who needed $100 more than Sixto Perez. Home is a trailer park in La Puente, where he lives with his mother and five siblings. Often, teachers say, his only meals are free school lunches. Although only 12, Sixto does odd jobs after school. Last fall, he was sweeping and stocking a mini-mart for $20 a week when temptation rode up on a bicycle. A man flashed a wad of bills, offering him $100 to sell drugs at his school, Los Robles Elementary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992
And The Winners Are. . . 1992 CITY OF ANGELS AWARDS Long Beach Little League, for winning the Little League World Series title after a Filipino team was found to have cheated. Oscar De La Hoya, the boxer from Los Angeles' Eastside, for fulfilling a promise he made to his dying mother: winning a gold medal in the Olympics. Ric Munoz, a 34-year-old West Hollywood legal secretary and marathon runner, for completing his 50th marathon despite being infected with the AIDS virus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1992
The spirit of sharing hits a frenzy of goodwill during the holiday season. People in Southern California are coming together in many different ways and places to spread holiday cheer. Christians and non-Christians, ordinary folks and celebrities are working to build a renewed sense of community. It's that time of year when the walls that too many of us have built around ourselves can come down a little. Let's face it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992
Sixto Perez, 12, often goes hungry. His family is so poor that lunch frequently is nothing except tortillas. He lives with his mother and five sisters and brothers in a crowded trailer in La Puente. They are not on welfare. Sixto makes a few dollars helping at a neighborhood store; his older brother also works. His father, a farm worker, sends money whenever he can. Despite the grinding poverty, the sixth-grader said no to selling drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, honesty does pay. Consider Sixto Perez, the impoverished 12-year-old from La Puente who was honored Tuesday for turning down $100 to sell drugs. His story, reported in The Times, struck a responsive chord that prompted more than 350 people to call and pledge money, food and clothing. "My heart really goes out to this boy," said Iris Wexler of Burbank, who said she is on a fixed income but plans to send $5 and a card.
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