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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnny Moore, 70, a trumpeter and founding member of the pioneering Jamaican ska and reggae band The Skatalites, died Saturday of cancer in Kingston, Jamaica, according to music promoter Herbie Miller. Moore helped form the band in 1964 along with saxophonists Tommy McCook and Roland Alphonso and trombonist Don Drummond. "He was the most creative of the trumpeters from the ska period," Miller said. "He was always willing to try different things." During the 14 months the band was together, it transformed jazz, movie themes and other genres of music with ska style.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
In the mid-1990s, a curious sound infiltrated mainstream pop music: ska, the swingin', pre-reggae dance style born in 1960s Jamaica. It was an odd turn at the tail end of the grunge era, and mirrored the rise of the late '70s British groups the Specials, Madness, the English Beat and the Selecter when they stormed British charts after the first wave of punk. The so-called third wave of ska propelled No Doubt and its charismatic lead singer, Gwen Stefani, to stardom when its 1995 album, “Tragic Kingdom,” erupted out of Anaheim after three years of the band bubbling under.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1997 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Upbeat out of Carpinteria play such an infectious and alluring brand of ska music that they could turn a sobriety checkpoint into a dance. Fortunately, that's one test neither the band nor their patrons will have to pass before, during or after their south-of-the-border gig in Ensenada this weekend. A bus or buses (depending on ticket sales) will leave Ventura on Friday afternoon bound for Ensenada.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | By Ernest Hardy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It would be easy to attribute the resurgence of American interest in 2-tone/ska (there are thriving scenes from Boston to Los Angeles) to our propensity for tossing every musical movement from the past into the recycle bin for quick repackaging and mindless consumption. But the history of the music (which originated in Jamaica) is a rich one, with unforced cultural hybridity and a quest for racial harmony as two of its strong tenets. The volatile political tenor of our times is not too different than the era when 2-tone/ska thrived, so it's also very much a soundtrack of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Daniel Hernandez, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a wide but quiet strip of Vermont Avenue in South Los Angeles, in the run-down Casa Honduras dance hall, the ska kids are waiting for the next band to start. Couples are making out in the corners of the venue, attached to a Honduran restaurant. They sport dreadlocks, Afros and spiky punk 'dos and are dressed in everything from camouflage and combat boots to Chucks and suspenders. A sound check ensues with a band called Blanco y Negro. Once its members get going, blasting the room with a frenetic Latin-punk sound sung both in English and Spanish, the young crowd forms a circle and begins to skank.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
It's been a good summer for orca sightings among kayakers in British Columbia's Johnstone Strait, and at least one outfitter is offering discounts on its last trip of the season. The Johnstone Strait, home to the Robson Bight (Michael Bigg) Orca Preserve, draws many kayak-trip outfitters, including Sea Kayak Adventures , which is based in Idaho but has been running Johnstone Strait trips since 1996. This year, said S.K.A. co-owner Nancy Mertz, “they had a late spring, and it suddenly blossomed into sunshine and orcas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | By Ernest Hardy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It would be easy to attribute the resurgence of American interest in 2-tone/ska (there are thriving scenes from Boston to Los Angeles) to our propensity for tossing every musical movement from the past into the recycle bin for quick repackaging and mindless consumption. But the history of the music (which originated in Jamaica) is a rich one, with unforced cultural hybridity and a quest for racial harmony as two of its strong tenets. The volatile political tenor of our times is not too different than the era when 2-tone/ska thrived, so it's also very much a soundtrack of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2011
MUSIC The '80s were much more diverse than today's crop of synthy revivalists might have you believe. At this bill, post-punk pranksters Devo team up with the ambitious dance experimentalists Tom Tom Club and modish two-tone ska act English Beat for a night showcasing the decade's range. San Manuel Casino, 777 San Manuel Blvd., Highland. 6:30 p.m. Thurs. $30-$40. Sanmanuel.com
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
In the mid-1990s, a curious sound infiltrated mainstream pop music: ska, the swingin', pre-reggae dance style born in 1960s Jamaica. It was an odd turn at the tail end of the grunge era, and mirrored the rise of the late '70s British groups the Specials, Madness, the English Beat and the Selecter when they stormed British charts after the first wave of punk. The so-called third wave of ska propelled No Doubt and its charismatic lead singer, Gwen Stefani, to stardom when its 1995 album, “Tragic Kingdom,” erupted out of Anaheim after three years of the band bubbling under.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As she surveyed the crowd Saturday at the Hollywood Palladium, Gwen Stefani might have thought that she was in the house of mirrors scene from "The Lady From Shanghai." Everywhere she looked, her own image was looking back.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Daniel Hernandez, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a wide but quiet strip of Vermont Avenue in South Los Angeles, in the run-down Casa Honduras dance hall, the ska kids are waiting for the next band to start. Couples are making out in the corners of the venue, attached to a Honduran restaurant. They sport dreadlocks, Afros and spiky punk 'dos and are dressed in everything from camouflage and combat boots to Chucks and suspenders. A sound check ensues with a band called Blanco y Negro. Once its members get going, blasting the room with a frenetic Latin-punk sound sung both in English and Spanish, the young crowd forms a circle and begins to skank.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | Robert Ito
Christian Jacobs is standing on the set of "The Aquabats! Super Show!," having cupfuls of what looks suspiciously like vomit poured all over his body. The set is cold, the slime colder, but Jacobs couldn't be happier. His new kids series, which premieres on the Hub network March 3, is the culmination of a two-decades-long dream of bringing the Aquabats superhero team to TV. In 1994, the Orange County native formed the Aquabats, a ska-punk band whose live shows combine giant inflatable characters and kaiju grudge matches with tunes such as "Attacked by Snakes!"
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
It's been a good summer for orca sightings among kayakers in British Columbia's Johnstone Strait, and at least one outfitter is offering discounts on its last trip of the season. The Johnstone Strait, home to the Robson Bight (Michael Bigg) Orca Preserve, draws many kayak-trip outfitters, including Sea Kayak Adventures , which is based in Idaho but has been running Johnstone Strait trips since 1996. This year, said S.K.A. co-owner Nancy Mertz, “they had a late spring, and it suddenly blossomed into sunshine and orcas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2011
MUSIC The '80s were much more diverse than today's crop of synthy revivalists might have you believe. At this bill, post-punk pranksters Devo team up with the ambitious dance experimentalists Tom Tom Club and modish two-tone ska act English Beat for a night showcasing the decade's range. San Manuel Casino, 777 San Manuel Blvd., Highland. 6:30 p.m. Thurs. $30-$40. Sanmanuel.com
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Reggae is some of the best music ever invented for moving your body, and arguably the worst for fomenting revolutions. After all, it's hard to incite a civic uprising when you're swaying your hips to a languid, offbeat tempo that's designed to sonically complement the sacramental ingesting of large quantities of recreational stimulants. So what's a socially committed Rastaman to do? If he's Michael Rose, of Black Uhuru renown, one option is to deliver the liberationist message in a mellow, but insistent and irresistible, groove.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnny Moore, 70, a trumpeter and founding member of the pioneering Jamaican ska and reggae band The Skatalites, died Saturday of cancer in Kingston, Jamaica, according to music promoter Herbie Miller. Moore helped form the band in 1964 along with saxophonists Tommy McCook and Roland Alphonso and trombonist Don Drummond. "He was the most creative of the trumpeters from the ska period," Miller said. "He was always willing to try different things." During the 14 months the band was together, it transformed jazz, movie themes and other genres of music with ska style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM
Sick of one-dimensional ska bands but unwilling to let go of zippy rhythms and a boisterous vibe? What you need is sprouting right now from Orange County's fertile, ever-more-varied music scene. Young bands Dial-7 and Zebrahead are making headway with an ambitious, amalgamated rock sound that equals or surpasses the energy of ska without sacrificing sonic complexity and imagination. Both feature a stoked, emphatic rapper playing off a capable singer who supplies catchy pop appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Reggae is some of the best music ever invented for moving your body, and arguably the worst for fomenting revolutions. After all, it's hard to incite a civic uprising when you're swaying your hips to a languid, offbeat tempo that's designed to sonically complement the sacramental ingesting of large quantities of recreational stimulants. So what's a socially committed Rastaman to do? If he's Michael Rose, of Black Uhuru renown, one option is to deliver the liberationist message in a mellow, but insistent and irresistible, groove.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
The fans who pushed Desmond Dekker's "Israelites" to the top of the pop charts in 1968 and 1969 had no firsthand experience with the social conditions in Jamaica that gave rise to the lyrics. They did not quite understand the island patois Dekker used in the song. And the musical style, ska, a precursor of reggae, was foreign to them. Yet, the song, an ode to the troubles of the poor, sold millions of copies, became the first purely Jamaican song to top the charts in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2005 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
Through its five-year history, KROQ's Inland Invasion has boasted the reemergence of the Sex Pistols, Duran Duran and Billy Idol, interspersed with a smaller host of up-and-comers inspired by these artists. The retro thrust set the show apart from the station's similarly act-packed jamborees, Weenie Roast and Acoustic Christmas, and attracted a decidedly older audience -- nostalgia seekers who listened to 106.7 FM when it was known as "Rock of the '80s."
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