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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though it attracts large numbers of primarily young fans to its energetic, dance-happy sounds, critics of ska's third wave complain that the music is lightweight and unimaginative. Worse, they say, the majority of the bands playing ska don't appreciate its roots, which stretch to the late-'50s in Kingston, Jamaica. The ambitious, 35-date Ska Against Racism tour that arrives Sunday at Oak Canyon Ranch in Santiago Canyon has a chance to alter that perception.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roll over Will Shakespeare: The Grove Theater Center, known mainly for its theatrical productions, is jumping into rock-concert promotion at its 550-seat outdoor Festival Amphitheater. A series of ska music performances, beginning with an afternoon Cinco De Mayo concert, will be GTC's first pop venture. The bands Jump With Joey, Save Ferris, My Superhero, Unsteady and Pocket Lent make up the bill for the show, which starts at 2 p.m. at the theater, 12852 Main St. Tickets: $10.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Skankin' Pickle, six road dogs out of the Bay Area in a van, will be stopping by the Underground in Santa Barbara to headline tonight's ska fest. Expect a whole lotta skankin'--that's kinder, gentler dancing that attracts considerably more females and fewer elbows. The band's first album, "Skafunkrastapunk," should provide more than enough clues as to what they're all about. That 1991 release has sold 15,000 copies so far, while the second album has sold 13,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For perspective on the boom in ska-influenced music--where it came from, and what might become of it--think of it as the story of the blues, written in miniature. The blues grew out of the rural South of the 1920s and '30s, where it was invented and nourished by a poor, black underclass. For ska, change the place and time to Trenchtown, the ghetto district of Kingston, Jamaica, in the late '50s and early '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For perspective on the boom in ska-influenced music--where it came from, and what might become of it--think of it as the story of the blues, written in miniature. The blues grew out of the rural South of the 1920s and '30s, where it was invented and nourished by a poor, black underclass. For ska, change the place and time to Trenchtown, the ghetto district of Kingston, Jamaica, in the late '50s and early '60s. Chapter Two for the blues, spearheaded by such stars as Muddy Waters and B.B.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though it attracts large numbers of primarily young fans to its energetic, dance-happy sounds, critics of ska's third wave complain that the music is lightweight and unimaginative. Worse, they say, the majority of the bands playing ska don't appreciate its roots, which stretch to the late-'50s in Kingston, Jamaica. The ambitious, 35-date Ska Against Racism tour that arrives Sunday at Oak Canyon Ranch in Santiago Canyon has a chance to alter that perception.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember the TV show, "The Courtship of Eddie's Father"? Well, Eddie was child actor Brandon Cruz, later the lead screamer of Dr. Know. His tube dad, Bill Bixby, went on to become the Incredible Hulk, but that's another story. This story is about the musicianship of Eddie's little brother, Darren Cruz, and his new band, the Ska-Daddyz. They'll be making people dance Saturday night at the Bermuda Triangle in Ventura. Opening will be Finnhead.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Careerwise, the Upbeat are in no big hurry. Eight guys, eight years, two hours of material, no tapes, no T-shirts, no MTV, no record deals, no big deal. There's an Upbeat sticker on the bathroom at Toes Tavern in Santa Barbara, which completes this year's advertising campaign. The Upbeat play about once, twice, maybe three times a month, and that seems to be plenty. Maybe it takes that long to recover from one of their gigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For perspective on the boom in ska-influenced music--where it came from, and what might become of it--think of it as the story of the blues, written in miniature. The blues grew out of the rural South of the 1920s and '30s, where it was invented and nourished by a poor, black underclass. For ska, change the place and time to Trenchtown, the ghetto district of Kingston, Jamaica, in the late '50s and early '60s. Chapter Two for the blues, spearheaded by such stars as Muddy Waters and B.B.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For perspective on the boom in ska-influenced music--where it came from, and what might become of it--think of it as the story of the blues, written in miniature. The blues grew out of the rural South of the 1920s and '30s, where it was invented and nourished by a poor, black underclass. For ska, change the place and time to Trenchtown, the ghetto district of Kingston, Jamaica, in the late '50s and early '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roll over Will Shakespeare: The Grove Theater Center, known mainly for its theatrical productions, is jumping into rock-concert promotion at its 550-seat outdoor Festival Amphitheater. A series of ska music performances, beginning with an afternoon Cinco De Mayo concert, will be GTC's first pop venture. The bands Jump With Joey, Save Ferris, My Superhero, Unsteady and Pocket Lent make up the bill for the show, which starts at 2 p.m. at the theater, 12852 Main St. Tickets: $10.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Skankin' Pickle, six road dogs out of the Bay Area in a van, will be stopping by the Underground in Santa Barbara to headline tonight's ska fest. Expect a whole lotta skankin'--that's kinder, gentler dancing that attracts considerably more females and fewer elbows. The band's first album, "Skafunkrastapunk," should provide more than enough clues as to what they're all about. That 1991 release has sold 15,000 copies so far, while the second album has sold 13,000.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember the TV show, "The Courtship of Eddie's Father"? Well, Eddie was child actor Brandon Cruz, later the lead screamer of Dr. Know. His tube dad, Bill Bixby, went on to become the Incredible Hulk, but that's another story. This story is about the musicianship of Eddie's little brother, Darren Cruz, and his new band, the Ska-Daddyz. They'll be making people dance Saturday night at the Bermuda Triangle in Ventura. Opening will be Finnhead.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Careerwise, the Upbeat are in no big hurry. Eight guys, eight years, two hours of material, no tapes, no T-shirts, no MTV, no record deals, no big deal. There's an Upbeat sticker on the bathroom at Toes Tavern in Santa Barbara, which completes this year's advertising campaign. The Upbeat play about once, twice, maybe three times a month, and that seems to be plenty. Maybe it takes that long to recover from one of their gigs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999 | Christine Castro, (714) 966-7440
The Killingtons, Freakdaddy and Dial-7 will be among the headlining bands jamming Saturday at the city's second annual Jam at the Dam band competition and festival. The event--which includes alternative, punk rock and ska music--begins at noon at the Brea Dam Recreational Area, 1600 N. Harbor Blvd. Bands compete for cash prizes. There also will be food and vendors. Admission and parking are free. Information: (714) 284-5587.
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