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Skeet Shooting

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SPORTS
April 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Matt Dryke, a 1984 Olympic gold medalist from Renton, Wash., broke 17 consecutive targets to win a sudden-death shootoff for the skeet gold medal Wednesday at the World Cup USA shooting competition in Chino.
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SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | By Mike Bresnahan
LONDON -- Brushing back a forgettable 2011 season, Vincent Hancock won a second consecutive Olympic gold medal in men's skeet shooting. Hancock became the first U.S. man to win skeet events in consecutive Olympics, though it wasn't without drama Tuesday at Royal Artillery Barracks. He held a slim one-point lead over Denmark's Anders Golding before the final round but grabbed some breathing room after Golding missed the 17th of 25 targets. Hancock hit 148 of 150 targets throughout the two-day competition, including a perfect 25 of 25 in the final round to beat Golding, who hit 146. Hancock, 23, struggled at times since winning the event at the Beijing Olympics, finishing 67th in last year's world championships in Serbia, where he said earlier this week he simply "bottomed out. " Qatar's Nasser Al-Attiya won the bronze medal after an extra round to break a tie with Russia's Valeriy Shomin.
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SPORTS
June 30, 1987 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
Cindy Raahauge is a shooting star, an 18-year-old American skeet shooter whose rapid ascent is the result of hard work, a lot of hours, monetary and moral support from her family, and fate. Make that two parts fate. First, there was Dan Carlisle, a five-time national champion, opening his gun shop within Raahauge's Hunting Club, owned by Cindy's father, Mike.
SPORTS
July 30, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LONDON - Contrary to popular belief at these London Olympics, Kim Rhode did not fire a shot heard 'round the world Sunday. She fired 99. Our Annie Oakley from Monrovia, who entered Sunday's women's skeet competition amid as much attention on a U.S. shooter as there has been since Roy Rogers, demolished the field. Watching her perform at the Royal Artillery Barracks felt a little like the days when Tiger Woods got ahead in a golf tournament and the other guys became puddles around him. Rhode had come to these Olympics as a prominent member of the pre-show hype.
SPORTS
July 30, 1987 | RALPH NICHOLS, Times Staff Writer
John Warner cocks his Browning 12-gauge shotgun, aims skyward and fires at two fleeting clay skeets. The discs splinter across the canyon floor, a 15-acre beach of broken targets and discarded shotgun shells at the base of the Santa Susana Mountains in Newhall. The pressure was on Warner. Missing a target at lowhouse No. 7, the easiest of the eight skeet-shooting stations means buying the drinks and facing the disjointed stare of skeet-puller Richard M. Perry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1989 | Leslie Wolf, Times staff writer
World Champion Skeet Shooters: the title perhaps conjures up images of rugged folk toting shotguns across the Western plains. But the real-life world champion skeet-shooting couple insist that the sport is fast becoming the domain of suburban families. Dr. Charles Clark, founder of the Encinitas Medical Group, and his wife, Gena, met 22 years ago at a skeet-shooting practice range and went on to build a life style around their hobby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're sharpshooting, quick-thinking, goal-achieving women. But on Wednesday, all they could do was blush. In a send-off fit for a departing army, the city of El Monte honored and--at times--overwhelmed two of its residents who are headed for the Olympics, skeet shooter Kim Rhode and archer Janet Dykman.
REAL ESTATE
March 8, 1992
In her lengthy article about living on boats in yacht harbors ("Welcome Aboard," Feb. 16), Laura Henning overlooked a few things indigenous to the nautical way of life. She didn't mention regatta racing, powerboat squadron rallies, sportfishing, water-skiing, whale watching, dolphin watching, scuba diving, spear-fishing, underwater photography, skeet shooting off the fantail, exploring all the islands along our coast, or the music every sailor hears when his shrouds and stays resonate with the fluttering of his sails in strong winds on heavy seas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1989
Regarding your story, "Tabloid Reporters on Firing Line at Don Johnson Wedding," let me make a few salient comments. I'm fascinated to hear that Mr. Johnson's flack, Elliot Mintz, now dismisses as a publicity stunt the incident in which two of our reporting personnel were fired upon and injured by buckshot as they flew by in a helicopter. Let me cite a front page story in the June 28 Aspen Times Daily. In it, the pilot of the helicopter, Vietnam veteran Burt Metcalf, says quite firmly and on the record that his craft was fired upon from the Johnson ranch and that he was treated like "a clay pigeon."
SPORTS
August 15, 2008 | Melissa Isaacson, Chicago Tribune
BEIJING -- After enduring a driving rainstorm to win the silver medal in skeet shooting Thursday at the Beijing Shooting Range, American Kimberly Rhode joked that maybe she would try trap shooting in the next Olympics. And why not? Rhode, the world's premier double-trap shooter over the last 12 years, made the transition to skeet look easy, narrowly missing out on the gold to Italy's Chiara Cainero and edging Germany's Christine Brinker, who got the bronze medal in the soggy shootout.
SPORTS
May 3, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Ah, the glamour of being an Olympic medalist. It is an overcast Wednesday morning in Newhall. The parking lot at the Oak Tree Gun Club is already filling up and the greatest competitive female gunslinger in the history of the good ol' USA is being put through the paces by a photographer. Our modern-day Annie Oakley stands on a square of dirt, next to a field of gravel and facing a scraggly hill. A sign warns of rattlesnakes in the area, and Kim Rhode laughs and says, "Almost sat on one here.
HOME & GARDEN
November 6, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Football great Joe Montana and his wife, Jennifer, have listed their 500-acre estate, with acreage in Sonoma County's wine country, for $49 million. The Calistoga property includes a 9,700-square-foot Tuscan-inspired main house, an equestrian center, two year-round creeks, a pond, a regulation-sized basketball court, a skeet shooting range, a caretaker's residence, a guesthouse, a swimming pool with a spa, a gym, a boccie ball court and a producing olive farm. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this story referred to the estate as only being in Sonoma County.
SPORTS
August 15, 2008 | Melissa Isaacson, Chicago Tribune
BEIJING -- After enduring a driving rainstorm to win the silver medal in skeet shooting Thursday at the Beijing Shooting Range, American Kimberly Rhode joked that maybe she would try trap shooting in the next Olympics. And why not? Rhode, the world's premier double-trap shooter over the last 12 years, made the transition to skeet look easy, narrowly missing out on the gold to Italy's Chiara Cainero and edging Germany's Christine Brinker, who got the bronze medal in the soggy shootout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're sharpshooting, quick-thinking, goal-achieving women. But on Wednesday, all they could do was blush. In a send-off fit for a departing army, the city of El Monte honored and--at times--overwhelmed two of its residents who are headed for the Olympics, skeet shooter Kim Rhode and archer Janet Dykman.
SPORTS
April 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Matt Dryke, a 1984 Olympic gold medalist from Renton, Wash., broke 17 consecutive targets to win a sudden-death shootoff for the skeet gold medal Wednesday at the World Cup USA shooting competition in Chino.
REAL ESTATE
March 8, 1992
In her lengthy article about living on boats in yacht harbors ("Welcome Aboard," Feb. 16), Laura Henning overlooked a few things indigenous to the nautical way of life. She didn't mention regatta racing, powerboat squadron rallies, sportfishing, water-skiing, whale watching, dolphin watching, scuba diving, spear-fishing, underwater photography, skeet shooting off the fantail, exploring all the islands along our coast, or the music every sailor hears when his shrouds and stays resonate with the fluttering of his sails in strong winds on heavy seas.
SPORTS
March 4, 1985 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
On a forthcoming segment of the TV show, "Bob Uecker's Wacky World of Sports," Uecker will look at you and say something like this: "You know, when I was playing in the minors in California many years ago, there was a power hitter out there we were scared to death of. . . . I mean, what this guy could do to a baseball, you wouldn't believe . . . " Uecker will then pick up a ball, go into a windup, and say something like: "I used to tell our pitchers to go with high, hard ones, like this . . .
SPORTS
May 3, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Ah, the glamour of being an Olympic medalist. It is an overcast Wednesday morning in Newhall. The parking lot at the Oak Tree Gun Club is already filling up and the greatest competitive female gunslinger in the history of the good ol' USA is being put through the paces by a photographer. Our modern-day Annie Oakley stands on a square of dirt, next to a field of gravel and facing a scraggly hill. A sign warns of rattlesnakes in the area, and Kim Rhode laughs and says, "Almost sat on one here.
SPORTS
February 5, 1992 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimberly Rhode has hobbies typical of a 12-year-old girl. She likes to collect stamps, seashells, money. . . . But there's one thing that sets her apart from other girls her age: She likes to tote a shotgun. And if the sight of a young girl lugging around a weapon nearly as big as she is doesn't capture your attention, watching one shoot as well as Kimberly Rhode does will. Rhode's specialty is skeet.
SPORTS
January 29, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
What can I tell you? Embarrassing, huh? Look. There are certain things that shouldn't happen. You shouldn't be able to club baby seals on an ice floe in the St. Lawrence River. You shouldn't pick wings off butterflies. You shouldn't park a baby carriage on a slippery hill leading down to a river. And, you shouldn't be allowed to play the Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl. Where is the Humane Society when you need it? Where are those organizations against cruelty to dumb animals?
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