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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009 | By times wire reports
The tiny King Kong figurine that helped launch the career of one of cinema's biggest monsters sold for about $200,000 at a London auction Tuesday. Auctioneer Christie's said the 22-inch skeleton was the one used in the climactic scene of the 1933 movie in which the giant ape climbs New York's Empire State Building. Other such figurines were used elsewhere in the movie, which wowed contemporary audiences with its groundbreaking special effects. The figurine's metal skeleton was once covered in cotton, rubber, liquid latex and rabbit's fur. But the monster's fleshy covering has since rotted away.
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NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON -- After a grueling 48-hour drive from Montana, the capital's latest transplant -- a 38-foot long, 66 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton -- got to rest its bones Tuesday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. The Smithsonian's newest acquisition is one of the largest and most complete specimens in the world, and it will be the museum's first real T. rex skeleton on display. “What could be more fabulous than welcoming a Tyrannosaurus rex to Washington D.C.?
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SPORTS
November 30, 2013 | By David Wharton
You don't see this in the NFL. Noelle Pikus-Pace, a top American in the Winter Olympic sport of skeleton, won a season-opening World Cup race in Calgary, Canada, only to be told -- an hour or so later -- that she had been disqualified. The reason? Her sled failed a post-race inspection because of an extra piece of tape wrapped around the handle. "Clearly, clearly, I should not have been disqualified," Pikus-Pace told the Associated Press in a telephone interview. "I'm so frustrated.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Trishna Patel
On a warm, picturesque California day at the beach, it's hard to walk more than five feet without seeing someone with a camera or mobile phone.  After all, the Instagram sunset possibilities are endless… But last Tuesday on the Huntington Beach Pier, photographer Ramon Ambriz stumbled upon an unusual sight that would soon rival filtered sunset pictures everywhere.  Sitting on the back of a chained bike was a skeleton wearing a bikini and a...
SCIENCE
July 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
It's the Leicester parking lot that just keeps giving. Last summer, archaeologists discovered the long-lost remains of King Richard III, buried beneath a nondescript parking lot in the English town of Leicester. This summer, the same team returned to the site and discovered something more puzzling: A medieval coffin of lead, buried inside a medieval coffin of stone. And inside the lead coffin they found a human skeleton - its knobbly feet jutting out out from a hole at the bottom of the coffin.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia - Locked in a battle for Olympic bronze, best friends Matt Antoine and John Daly knew one of them would leave disappointed. The American skeleton racers, however, never could have imagined the depth of that disappointment. Unable to catch the first- and second-place leaders, Antoine and Daly had engaged in a seesaw battle for third place during the first three heats at the Sanki Sliding Center. At the start of the final run Saturday, Daly sat in fourth, just four-hundredths of a second behind his teammate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County sheriff's and coroner's officials have agreed to launch an inquiry into the handling of Mitrice Richardson's remains, which a coroner's official said were removed from a ravine without his department's permission. Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter said in an interview that he was "very clear" in telling sheriff's officials that they should not to move Richardson's remains until coroner's investigators had arrived on the scene or until clearance had been granted.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Candus Thomson
Amy Williams tamed the Whistler track over two nights to win the women's skeleton competition and become the first Winter Olympian in 30 years to earn a gold medal for Britain. However, Williams, who survived a protest Thursday by the U.S. team over the shape of her helmet, faces a second challenge from the Canadians, who also claim that the grooves -- spoilers -- do not conform to international-federation standards. The International Federation of Bobsleigh and Skeleton (FIBT)
SPORTS
February 18, 2010 | By Candus Thomson
Zach Lund has grown. His hair has not. The two are related. This should be Lund's second Olympics as a member of the U.S. skeleton team. Instead, he's a rookie with a lot to prove. Four years ago, when he was at the top of his game -- ranked No. 1 in the world -- he was banned from the Turin Games for using finasteride, a drug that fights baldness but also was thought to be a steroid-masking agent. Its use was legal until 2005, then banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, and Lund insisted he never knew about the switch.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A skeleton found in the wilderness last year was not that of Everett Ruess, a legendary wanderer of the 1930s, despite initial forensic tests that seemed to have solved an enduring mystery, his nephew told the Associated Press. "The skeleton is not related to us," said Brian Ruess, 44, of Portland, Ore. Everett Ruess vanished in 1934, at age 20. Initial DNA tests had been termed "irrefutable" by University of Colorado researchers, but one of them said Wednesday he accepted as final the new results from the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory in Rockville, Md. Utah's state archaeologist, Kevin Jones, had questioned the original results.
SPORTS
February 23, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia -- The United States didn't strike gold at the Sanki Sliding Center, but it made a lot of history. From Erin Hamlin's first-ever American medal in singles luge to Steven Holcomb's drought-ending bobsled runs, the sliding sports accounted for some of Team USA's most memorable moments in the Caucasus Mountains. "Dreams are a scary thing, because there is always a chance you won't accomplish them," said Steve Langton, who won bronze in both the two-man and four-man bobsled events.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia - Locked in a battle for Olympic bronze, best friends Matt Antoine and John Daly knew one of them would leave disappointed. The American skeleton racers, however, never could have imagined the depth of that disappointment. Unable to catch the first- and second-place leaders, Antoine and Daly had engaged in a seesaw battle for third place during the first three heats at the Sanki Sliding Center. At the start of the final run Saturday, Daly sat in fourth, just four-hundredths of a second behind his teammate.
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia - An Olympic medal had eluded Noelle Pikus-Pace in the cruelest of ways during her career. In 2005, a runaway bobsled struck her in an outrun of a Canadian track, shattering her leg and causing her to miss the Turin Games in 2006. Five years later, she missed a medal by one-tenth of a second in Vancouver. So, her jubilation was understandable Friday after she finished second in the women's skeleton event. FRAMEWORK: Best images from Sochi "This is better than gold for me," she said, through a mixture of tears and laughter.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
In the days leading up to the biggest skeleton race of her career, Noelle Pikus-Pace did something world-class athletes rarely do: She took some time off to soak in the Olympic atmosphere with her husband and children. The United States' top racer participated in only two of six official training runs here, passing on opportunities to familiarize herself with the course and its unusual uphill passes. It's an unorthodox approach -- especially with the women's competition starting Thursday -- but it's one that has worked for Pikus-Pace since she came out of retirement two years ago. "Being a mom is my first priority and it always will be. To be able to do this all together is a perfect storm," she said before the Games officially opened.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia -- With a heavy heart and a distracted mind, U.S. skeleton racer Katie Uhlaender pushed through her final training runs this week. Wednesday was the fifth anniversary of her father's death, an event so devastating she contemplated quitting her sport. Her two practice runs that day were among the slowest she had posted since arriving here nearly two weeks ago. "She tried to push through it, but it was an emotional day," U.S. coach Tuffy Latour said. "[Thursday] we can focus on the race.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | By John Cherwa
Best Bets to watch at the Sochi Olympics on Friday: Men's Super Combined Ted Ligety, who won this event in 2006 in Turin, Italy, gets a chance to make his mark for the U.S. team. And, of course, there is always Bode Miller, who won the gold in 2010 in Vancouver. However, it's a very deep field and the softening snow is making things unpredictable. Men's Figure Skating It should be a great final day of men's competition in the free skate as the three best skaters are fighting for podium spots.
SPORTS
February 7, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The birthplace of the sled-riding sport called skeleton is built from scratch each winter, a mountain of snow pounded and molded into a U-shaped tunnel of blue ice that turns 10 corners from here to the neighboring village of Celerina. This object of love, devotion--and perhaps a little madness--is a track about four feet wide and is among the world's most famous winter-sports landmarks, even though it is relatively unknown in the United States.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
In the days leading up to the biggest skeleton race of her career, Noelle Pikus-Pace did something world-class athletes rarely do: She took some time off to soak in the Olympic atmosphere with her husband and children. The United States' top racer participated in only two of six official training runs here, passing on opportunities to familiarize herself with the course and its unusual uphill passes. It's an unorthodox approach -- especially with the women's competition starting Thursday -- but it's one that has worked for Pikus-Pace since she came out of retirement two years ago. "Being a mom is my first priority and it always will be. To be able to do this all together is a perfect storm," she said before the Games officially opened.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
The skeleton of the medieval monarch King Richard III will bear just one final indignity before it is laid, once again, to rest. Researchers at the University of Leicester in England plan to sequence the deceased ruler's entire genome by collecting some of his bone material, grinding it into a powder, and then extracting the DNA. But time is running out. "He will be re-interred soon, so the ability to do this just exists for a short amount...
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
Noelle Pikus-Pace's journey to Sochi, Russia, began the moment she walked away from skeleton racing after the Vancouver Games. Seemingly content with her fourth-place finish in 2010, she no longer wanted to spend months on the road, moving from country to country while her family stayed behind. She wanted to be home with them in Utah, where she didn't have to worry about missing both the extraordinary and mundane moments in her daughter Lacee's life. She would, of course, miss the thrill of competing and whipping headfirst down an icy track at 90 mph. But those feelings seemed insignificant when compared with how much she had missed her family while competing on the World Cup circuit during the previous two seasons.
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