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February 16, 2006
The U.S. won gold medals in men's and women's skeleton in 2002 when the sport was revived for the Salt Lake City Games, but Katie Uhlaender of Breckenridge, Colo., isn't expected to beat out favorites Mellisa Hollingsworth-Richards of Canada and Maya Pedersen of Switzerland. The U.S.
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SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
In the days leading up to the biggest skeleton race of her career, Noelle Pikus-Pace did something world-class athletes rarely do: She took some time off to soak in the Olympic atmosphere with her husband and children. The United States' top racer participated in only two of six official training runs here, passing on opportunities to familiarize herself with the course and its unusual uphill passes. It's an unorthodox approach -- especially with the women's competition starting Thursday -- but it's one that has worked for Pikus-Pace since she came out of retirement two years ago. "Being a mom is my first priority and it always will be. To be able to do this all together is a perfect storm," she said before the Games officially opened.
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NEWS
February 17, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pulling a 95-pound sled, you bound alongside the track, gaining speed. All at once you dive headfirst onto your sled. Down you go, chin hanging off, nose inches from the ice. You whoosh down the slick, mile-long course at 85 mph, sounding like an accelerating jet plane. You confront G-force winds on 15 to 20 grueling turns, hoping to high heaven that your neck muscles can keep your head held up.
SPORTS
February 16, 2006
The U.S. won gold medals in men's and women's skeleton in 2002 when the sport was revived for the Salt Lake City Games, but Katie Uhlaender of Breckenridge, Colo., isn't expected to beat out favorites Mellisa Hollingsworth-Richards of Canada and Maya Pedersen of Switzerland. The U.S.
SPORTS
January 24, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
An arbitrator Monday found no evidence to substantiate claims of sexual harassment leveled at U.S. skeleton Coach Tim Nardiello. But U.S. Olympic officials said it remained uncertain whether he will coach at next month's Turin Olympics. Meanwhile, the top U.S. men's skeleton racer, Zach Lund, was issued a public warning but not suspended by U.S. anti-doping officials over a failed drug test linked to a hair-restoration potion.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
In the days leading up to the biggest skeleton race of her career, Noelle Pikus-Pace did something world-class athletes rarely do: She took some time off to soak in the Olympic atmosphere with her husband and children. The United States' top racer participated in only two of six official training runs here, passing on opportunities to familiarize herself with the course and its unusual uphill passes. It's an unorthodox approach -- especially with the women's competition starting Thursday -- but it's one that has worked for Pikus-Pace since she came out of retirement two years ago. "Being a mom is my first priority and it always will be. To be able to do this all together is a perfect storm," she said before the Games officially opened.
SPORTS
October 3, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Pain relievers have been the biggest weapon for David Toms this weekend. Fighting back pain, Toms shot his second consecutive six-under-par 66 on Saturday, taking a three-stroke lead into today's final round of the PGA Buick Challenge at Pine Mountain, Ga. "There were more Advils than birdies," Toms said of his round. Popping the ibuprofen to relieve the pain, Toms put some distance between Stuart Appleby and Harrison Frazar with three birdies down the stretch to move to a 16-under 200.
SPORTS
January 25, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
I never saw her face. She was always moving too fast. I knew her only for her shiny helmet, blond ponytail, oversized basketball jersey and dumb guts. She would fly past me on her skateboard as I drove up my hilly street in La Cañada. She was sometimes on her back, usually in a crouch, always teetering on the edge. It was a narrow road, lined with thick trees, sometimes crowded with SUVs. She couldn't have been more than 12 years old. It was a miracle she didn't end up in my windshield.
TRAVEL
January 16, 2005 | Craig Nakano, Times Staff Writer
As the country's best-known film festival opens Thursday, one drama that already has generated considerable buzz will play out off-screen: Park City's love-hate relationship with Sundance. Hotels and restaurants love the Sundance Film Festival, expected to draw more than 36,000 visitors to this town of 7,400. Crowds last year, two-thirds from out of state, spent $41.4 million on accommodations, meals and various tourist trappings during the 11-day festival.
SPORTS
January 24, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
An arbitrator Monday found no evidence to substantiate claims of sexual harassment leveled at U.S. skeleton Coach Tim Nardiello. But U.S. Olympic officials said it remained uncertain whether he will coach at next month's Turin Olympics. Meanwhile, the top U.S. men's skeleton racer, Zach Lund, was issued a public warning but not suspended by U.S. anti-doping officials over a failed drug test linked to a hair-restoration potion.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pulling a 95-pound sled, you bound alongside the track, gaining speed. All at once you dive headfirst onto your sled. Down you go, chin hanging off, nose inches from the ice. You whoosh down the slick, mile-long course at 85 mph, sounding like an accelerating jet plane. You confront G-force winds on 15 to 20 grueling turns, hoping to high heaven that your neck muscles can keep your head held up.
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