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SPORTS
February 16, 2006
The U.S. won gold medals in men's and women's skeleton in 2002 when the sport was revived for the Salt Lake City Games, but Katie Uhlaender of Breckenridge, Colo., isn't expected to beat out favorites Mellisa Hollingsworth-Richards of Canada and Maya Pedersen of Switzerland. The U.S.
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SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
In the days leading up to the biggest skeleton race of her career, Noelle Pikus-Pace did something world-class athletes rarely do: She took some time off to soak in the Olympic atmosphere with her husband and children. The United States' top racer participated in only two of six official training runs here, passing on opportunities to familiarize herself with the course and its unusual uphill passes. It's an unorthodox approach -- especially with the women's competition starting Thursday -- but it's one that has worked for Pikus-Pace since she came out of retirement two years ago. "Being a mom is my first priority and it always will be. To be able to do this all together is a perfect storm," she said before the Games officially opened.
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SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Americans might not understand the inner workings of skeleton, but they embraced the sport four years ago in Salt Lake City. It was fast, bordering on insane. It looked cool on television. And the U.S. won the men's and women's gold medals. Four years later, the sport could be tilted back toward obscurity in America. The U.S. coach didn't make it to Italy, fired two weeks ago after allegations of sexual harassment. The top U.S.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Candus Thomson
Amy Williams tamed the Whistler track over two nights to win the women's skeleton competition and become the first Winter Olympian in 30 years to earn a gold medal for Britain. However, Williams, who survived a protest Thursday by the U.S. team over the shape of her helmet, faces a second challenge from the Canadians, who also claim that the grooves -- spoilers -- do not conform to international-federation standards. The International Federation of Bobsleigh and Skeleton (FIBT)
SPORTS
February 10, 2006 | Helene Elliott
MEN'S SINGLES * Where: Cesana Pariol. * When: Feb. 17. * Best of the U.S.: Eric Bernotas of Avondale, Pa., finished third in the season's World Cup standings with 390 points. Teammate Kevin Ellis of Dallas was fourth, with 365 points. * Best of the rest: Jeff Pain of Canada won three of the last four World Cup races and his second successive World Cup title. He's also the world champion. Gregor Staehli of Switzerland, the 2002 silver medalist, was the World Cup runner-up. * U.S.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pulling a 95-pound sled, you bound alongside the track, gaining speed. All at once you dive headfirst onto your sled. Down you go, chin hanging off, nose inches from the ice. You whoosh down the slick, mile-long course at 85 mph, sounding like an accelerating jet plane. You confront G-force winds on 15 to 20 grueling turns, hoping to high heaven that your neck muscles can keep your head held up.
SPORTS
January 24, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
An arbitrator Monday found no evidence to substantiate claims of sexual harassment leveled at U.S. skeleton Coach Tim Nardiello. But U.S. Olympic officials said it remained uncertain whether he will coach at next month's Turin Olympics. Meanwhile, the top U.S. men's skeleton racer, Zach Lund, was issued a public warning but not suspended by U.S. anti-doping officials over a failed drug test linked to a hair-restoration potion.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Candus Thomson
Amy Williams tamed the Whistler track over two nights to win the women's skeleton competition and become the first Winter Olympian in 30 years to earn a gold medal for Britain. However, Williams, who survived a protest Thursday by the U.S. team over the shape of her helmet, faces a second challenge from the Canadians, who also claim that the grooves -- spoilers -- do not conform to international-federation standards. The International Federation of Bobsleigh and Skeleton (FIBT)
SPORTS
January 25, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Olympic Committee, acting only one day after an arbitrator ruled there was no evidence to prove sexual harassment claims against U.S. skeleton Coach Tim Nardiello, announced Tuesday it would not allow him to guide the team at next month's Turin Olympics. Nardiello has repeatedly denied wrongdoing. The USOC said Nardiello had violated ethics codes.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | Stacy St. Clair
In the days leading up to the biggest skeleton race of her career, Noelle Pikus-Pace did something world-class athletes rarely do: She took some time off to soak in the Olympic atmosphere with her husband and children. The United States' top racer participated in only two of six official training runs here, passing on opportunities to familiarize herself with the course and its unusual uphill passes. It's an unorthodox approach -- especially with the women's competition starting Thursday -- but it's one that has worked for Pikus-Pace since she came out of retirement two years ago. "Being a mom is my first priority and it always will be. To be able to do this all together is a perfect storm," she said before the Games officially opened.
SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Americans might not understand the inner workings of skeleton, but they embraced the sport four years ago in Salt Lake City. It was fast, bordering on insane. It looked cool on television. And the U.S. won the men's and women's gold medals. Four years later, the sport could be tilted back toward obscurity in America. The U.S. coach didn't make it to Italy, fired two weeks ago after allegations of sexual harassment. The top U.S.
SPORTS
February 16, 2006
The U.S. won gold medals in men's and women's skeleton in 2002 when the sport was revived for the Salt Lake City Games, but Katie Uhlaender of Breckenridge, Colo., isn't expected to beat out favorites Mellisa Hollingsworth-Richards of Canada and Maya Pedersen of Switzerland. The U.S.
SPORTS
February 10, 2006 | Helene Elliott
MEN'S SINGLES * Where: Cesana Pariol. * When: Feb. 17. * Best of the U.S.: Eric Bernotas of Avondale, Pa., finished third in the season's World Cup standings with 390 points. Teammate Kevin Ellis of Dallas was fourth, with 365 points. * Best of the rest: Jeff Pain of Canada won three of the last four World Cup races and his second successive World Cup title. He's also the world champion. Gregor Staehli of Switzerland, the 2002 silver medalist, was the World Cup runner-up. * U.S.
SPORTS
January 25, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Olympic Committee, acting only one day after an arbitrator ruled there was no evidence to prove sexual harassment claims against U.S. skeleton Coach Tim Nardiello, announced Tuesday it would not allow him to guide the team at next month's Turin Olympics. Nardiello has repeatedly denied wrongdoing. The USOC said Nardiello had violated ethics codes.
SPORTS
January 24, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
An arbitrator Monday found no evidence to substantiate claims of sexual harassment leveled at U.S. skeleton Coach Tim Nardiello. But U.S. Olympic officials said it remained uncertain whether he will coach at next month's Turin Olympics. Meanwhile, the top U.S. men's skeleton racer, Zach Lund, was issued a public warning but not suspended by U.S. anti-doping officials over a failed drug test linked to a hair-restoration potion.
SPORTS
February 12, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Noelle Pikus-Pace liked bobsledding, but she'll never forget her first venture at skeleton, not quite five years ago. "I kind of got suckered into it," she said. "My coach showed me this little cookie sheet and put a helmet on my head without telling me what it was. He told me to pick my feet up, and that was it. "It was halfway down the track, but I was screaming the whole time." On Friday, she shrieked for joy, as she became the first U.S. woman to win the World Cup skeleton title.
SPORTS
February 12, 2005 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Noelle Pikus-Pace liked bobsledding, but she'll never forget her first venture at skeleton, not quite five years ago. "I kind of got suckered into it," she said. "My coach showed me this little cookie sheet and put a helmet on my head without telling me what it was. He told me to pick my feet up, and that was it. "It was halfway down the track, but I was screaming the whole time." On Friday, she shrieked for joy, as she became the first U.S. woman to win the World Cup skeleton title.
SPORTS
January 25, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
I never saw her face. She was always moving too fast. I knew her only for her shiny helmet, blond ponytail, oversized basketball jersey and dumb guts. She would fly past me on her skateboard as I drove up my hilly street in La Cañada. She was sometimes on her back, usually in a crouch, always teetering on the edge. It was a narrow road, lined with thick trees, sometimes crowded with SUVs. She couldn't have been more than 12 years old. It was a miracle she didn't end up in my windshield.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pulling a 95-pound sled, you bound alongside the track, gaining speed. All at once you dive headfirst onto your sled. Down you go, chin hanging off, nose inches from the ice. You whoosh down the slick, mile-long course at 85 mph, sounding like an accelerating jet plane. You confront G-force winds on 15 to 20 grueling turns, hoping to high heaven that your neck muscles can keep your head held up.
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