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Sketches

NEWS
May 24, 1992 | STEPHEN BROWN, REUTERS
Sick of body odor on subway trains and chain smokers in restaurants? Had your car boxed in by double parking or a good film ruined by the couple in front chatting? Fed up with litterbugs and road hogs? Take heart. In Portugal at least, slobs and other public nuisances are getting their wrists slapped by a government television campaign telling them to mind their manners.
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NEWS
March 21, 1985 | BOB WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Pete Ambagtsheer, a 57-year-old former sailor who dances and sings for tourists at Ports o' Call village in San Pedro, is mourning the theft of his puppet collection, along with other art works created over a lifetime as an itinerant artist. Ambagtsheer said he suspects that a waterfront transient he befriended took the ancient camper truck he lived in with his near-life-size puppets, and "everything--my puppets, my tools, my sketches, my home!" ". . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Long known for being genteel and charmingly indifferent to headline news, the New Yorker in recent years has earned a reputation of skewering political and cultural figures with its cover art. Barry Blitt's infamous 2008 Barack and Michelle Obama fist bump cover poking fun at the perception of the then-presidential candidate, for instance, spawned countless satiric imitations. With "Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See" (Abrams), art director Françoise Mouly gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the selection process.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2009 | Christopher Smith
An English newspaper once described a soccer star as having "developed splendidly and then aged as well as could be hoped for." That might sum up another U.K. icon, Monty Python. Because while it's been 25 years since the seminal six-man English comedy troupe has produced any new material, its thoughtful silliness still resonates. Now the group is again among us, cheerfully exploiting its upcoming 40th anniversary with a Python-palooza of events on tap: a new play in Los Angeles based on its classic TV sketches, a six-part documentary on the IFC channel, a book describing its live performances and a rare coming together of the group's five living members for a Q&A session in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Claire Zulkey
Sketches about funny voices and the 2012 election dominated the opening of "Saturday Night Live's" 38 th season. Host Seth MacFarlane, creator and voice actor of “Family Guy” and “Ted,” tended to rely upon his vocal characters for most of his starring scenes (a dark sketch about a damaged puppet class attendee was arguably the most successful in terms of both humor and originality), although the host did take a stab at celebrity impression during a fond Weekend Update tweak at the genial dimness of Olympics star Ryan Lochte.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1987 | BILL STEIGERWALD
The most astonishing thing about "NBC Presents the AFI Comedy Special" isn't that it's so consistently and so pathetically unfunny. It's that NBC doesn't seem to have a clue that it's created yet another TV crime against comedy (tonight at 10 on Channels 4, 36, 39).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Bill Gold was just 21 and a recent graduate in illustration and design from the Pratt Institute in New York when he was hired in the advertising department of Warner Bros. in New York City. His first poster was for the 1942 classic " Casablanca. " Over the next 60 years, Gold was responsible for either designing or working with illustrators on about 2,000 motion pictures, including Elia Kazan's 1951 "A Streetcar Named Desire" and 1955's "East of Eden," Alfred Hitchcock's 1954 "Dial M for Murder," Stanley Kubrick's 1971 "A Clockwork Orange" and 1975's "Barry Lyndon," and 35 Clint Eastwood movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1986 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Courtroom artists David Rose and Bill Robles recently had bad seats in a pint-sized courtroom. Their view was blocked by a pillar and by prosecutors sitting at a nearby table. While Rose anxiously shifted in his chair, craning for a better view, Robles sat quietly, occasionally giving the defendant he wanted to draw a long stare through his bifocals. Robles seemed satisfied with the progress of his handiwork, but Rose, an elderly gent with bushy eyebrows, got impatient.
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