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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1996
"Vail Buys Colorado!" screams the headline in the current edition of a popular skiing magazine. It was a spoof, of course, but one with a smidgen of reality. Vail Resorts Inc., operator of the ski area that is often ranked No. 1 in North America, has proposed buying up three nearby competitors--Keystone, Breckenridge and Arapaho Basin--for $300 million. If the sale goes through, Vail will wind up with more than 40% of Colorado's ski market.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 2010 | By Hugo Martín and Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
For Larry Davis, gray skies and low-hanging clouds are reasons to smile: They mean the ski season is here. A late November storm dumped several feet of snow on high-elevation resorts in the Eastern Sierra and Lake Tahoe and dusted lower-elevation resorts in Southern California with several inches of powder. Davis, a stock trader from Santa Clarita, made it up to Mammoth Mountain for opening day Nov. 11, declaring it the best he had seen in years. "The runs at the top were open.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1997 | SANDY SHORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Adam Aron figures he doesn't need a human-sized mouse with big ears to lure vacationers to his playground. What he does need, though, is a way to convince harried Americans that there is more respite on his mountaintops of waist-deep snow and towering pines than at a theme park. "What we're competing against is a beach in Hawaii or a ship in the Caribbean or some other use of the discretionary dollar," said Aron, who heads Vail Resorts Inc.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2009 | By David Morrill
Last Christmas, the Sierra Nevada ski industry did everything it could to put on its best face in light of little snow and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. The smile was fake. This year the optimism is genuine. "Because of the early snow, everyone I've talked to has never been more optimistic about this season," said Rob Brown, president and publisher of Orinda, Calif.-based Mountain News Corp., which publishes Onthesnow.com and provides snow reports for media outlets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
In October 2005, Dave McCoy's friends bought him a digital camera, hoping it would help the founder of the storied Mammoth Mountain ski resort stay active after selling the enterprise to a private investment firm. Instead, McCoy found a new calling. The elder statesman of the California ski industry has been, as he likes to say, "shootin' shots" ever since, exploring the world through zoom lenses with the same enthusiasm and dedication he used to transform the remote mountain into a ski resort that sold for $365 million.
SPORTS
June 10, 1990
Sepp Ruschp, 81, credited as a principal builder of the ski industry in the United States, has died of what Stowe, Vt., police said was a self-inflicted gunshot wound.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | Hugo Martin
Savor those memories, California snow lovers, because this season may be as good as it gets. The wettest winter in more than a century produced a record year for the ski industry. The California Ski Industry Assn. reported 8.1 million ski visits statewide last winter, surpassing the previous record of 7.5 million visits. "It's been a spectacular season," says association executive director Bob Roberts.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California ski industry is hoping for a rebound from a disappointing 1996-97 season with weather and economic forecasts cooperating so far. "We're having a fine season," said Bob Roberts, executive director of the California Ski Industry Assn., a San Francisco trade group that represents 39 resorts with combined revenue of about $500 million. "The resorts have a strong sense of demand, our international business is getting stronger each year . . .
SPORTS
March 1, 1996 | BOB LOCHNER
Five California ski lifts, including one at Mammoth Mountain and two at June Mountain, have been shut down pending inspection of possible cracks in their grip mechanisms. The lifts, all with detachable quad (four-skier) chairs, are the Yan 7 type manufactured by Lift Engineering of Carson City, Nev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Howard More, a pioneer in the Southern California ski industry who helped popularize the sport in the local mountains but who was forced to part with his family's Wrightwood resort after a series of dry winters, has died. He was 91. More, a longtime resident of Pasadena, died June 10 from complications associated with Alzheimer's disease at Mountain View Estates care center in Altadena, said his daughter, Carol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2009 | By Louis Sahagun
In October 2005, Dave McCoy's friends bought him a digital camera, hoping it would help the founder of the storied Mammoth Mountain ski resort stay active after selling the enterprise to a private investment firm. Instead, McCoy found a new calling. The elder statesman of the California ski industry has been, as he likes to say, "shootin' shots" ever since, exploring the world through zoom lenses with the same enthusiasm and dedication he used to transform the remote mountain into a ski resort that sold for $365 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2007 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
Beneath a steely sky and icy snow flurries, cross-country skiers glide over a 130-acre alpine meadow that Kirkwood Mountain Resort has preserved for wildlife and recreation. In nearby restaurants, diners use plates and utensils that are reusable or made with recycled materials. And employees receive financial rewards for carpooling to work. Kirkwood, a 35-year-old vacation community nestled in a box canyon south of Lake Tahoe, is a proud signer of a national environmental charter for ski areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Howard More, a pioneer in the Southern California ski industry who helped popularize the sport in the local mountains but who was forced to part with his family's Wrightwood resort after a series of dry winters, has died. He was 91. More, a longtime resident of Pasadena, died June 10 from complications associated with Alzheimer's disease at Mountain View Estates care center in Altadena, said his daughter, Carol.
TRAVEL
November 20, 2005 | Times staff
THE ski industry is feeling the pinch of increased fuel costs, and many resorts in California and Colorado have posted increases in this season's daily lift-ticket prices. "It's very expensive to run a ski resort. Our biggest costs each year come from fuel and labor," said Dana Vander Houwen, a spokesman for California's Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. "We expect fuel costs to increase significantly."
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | Hugo Martin
Savor those memories, California snow lovers, because this season may be as good as it gets. The wettest winter in more than a century produced a record year for the ski industry. The California Ski Industry Assn. reported 8.1 million ski visits statewide last winter, surpassing the previous record of 7.5 million visits. "It's been a spectacular season," says association executive director Bob Roberts.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
A blizzard of early snow has Golden State ski resorts seeing black -- as in profits. Record-setting October storms dropped more than two feet of snow in the mountains of Southern California, enabling resorts to open their slopes in October, a month earlier than usual. At the San Bernardino Mountain resort area of Big Bear, two feet of snow fell during a single day in October. In 2002, only three feet of snow fell the entire year.
TRAVEL
November 20, 2005 | Times staff
THE ski industry is feeling the pinch of increased fuel costs, and many resorts in California and Colorado have posted increases in this season's daily lift-ticket prices. "It's very expensive to run a ski resort. Our biggest costs each year come from fuel and labor," said Dana Vander Houwen, a spokesman for California's Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. "We expect fuel costs to increase significantly."
BUSINESS
December 26, 1988 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
With the skiing business starting to level off in the United States, the nation's largest maker of alpine--or downhill--skis is looking to Europe for growth in the 1990s. The ski maker is Anthony Industries, based in Southern California and most often associated with summertime recreation because of its Anthony Pools unit. But among its nine businesses, Anthony owns K2 Corp., a Seattle-based ski equipment and clothing maker. "Europe is the world's largest ski market," says Bernard I.
SPORTS
November 13, 2002 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
When darkness gave way to sunshine Monday morning, long-barren slopes wore a glistening white blanket up to four feet thick in places, courtesy of a blizzard that worked its magic for four long, cold days through the Sierra Nevada mountains. Since, the mad scramble that follows every first storm has been underway, as ski-area operators began preparing for the onslaught of skiers and snowboarders.
TRAVEL
November 10, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Here, if you're a troublemaker, is a volume to leave casually in the conversation pit at your slope-side rental condo. But read it first. "Downhill Slide" is about the business of skiing and how the three 800-pound gorillas of the industry have seized upon the sport (and its offspring, snowboarding) as a tool for the making of real estate development fortunes. The gorillas are Intrawest Corp. (owner of Mammoth, among its many resorts), Vail Resorts Inc. and American Skiing Co.
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