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Skid Row Development Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991
I am writing in regard to the two-part article on Fort Washington, the New York homeless shelter (Part A, May 5-6). I have long recognized many of the problems raised in your articles. There are no simple answers to helping all of the homeless population. However, I would like to offer these simple guidelines for helping those who are willing and able to return to society: 1. Programs should be of a manageable size with 150 beds as a maximum. 2. Those who want help must be separated from those who don't, because peer support and a safe, secure and sanitary environment are essential for success.
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NEWS
September 15, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's homeless are set square in the public eye as a huddled mass of the drunk, drugged and mentally ill headed for Hades in a shopping cart. That is the short, misguided view of the visible minority. A truer, broader picture would be of the recovering homeless, who outnumber sidewalk sleepers 2-to-1, and for whom there are new and, one hopes, permanent exits from Skid Row.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1988
Without the process called "tax-increment financing," none of the very fine buildings we can be proud of would exist. Would our friends who are so critical of the CRA be content to sit idly by and watch our downtown deteriorate? Lifting the cap is vital if we are to accomplish any of the social services mentioned in the column. I believe it is commendable that Mayor Bradley proposes half of the money for low- and moderate-income housing and after-school day-care programs. Can't we realize that if the cap isn't lifted, none of this will occur?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1991
I am writing in regard to the two-part article on Fort Washington, the New York homeless shelter (Part A, May 5-6). I have long recognized many of the problems raised in your articles. There are no simple answers to helping all of the homeless population. However, I would like to offer these simple guidelines for helping those who are willing and able to return to society: 1. Programs should be of a manageable size with 150 beds as a maximum. 2. Those who want help must be separated from those who don't, because peer support and a safe, secure and sanitary environment are essential for success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1988
Your editorial "It's Outrageous" is itself outrageous. The "residents" had lived across from City Hall for six months, and, said your editorial, "heartlessly, thoughtlessly" these "helpless in our midst" had no place to go. Just this week (Metro, June 27) your staff writer, Penelope McMillan, wrote that such a program as Transition House has had little success with the hard-core homeless. They would never go to the shelter because it has too many "rules." Life has rules. When one flouts the rules of life, one can expect to get sick or, worse, die. So with the "rules" of society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989
I am writing in review of the July 15 article (Part I) on the disgusting corruption at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Greed and personal gain took precedent over helping the poor and the homeless of this country. I knew (former HUD Secretary) Sam Pierce wasn't doing his job very well back in 1986. That was the year that he came to tape an interview for "Nightline" from Transition House, our award-winning medium-term shelter in downtown Los Angeles. I knew we were in trouble when he didn't understand his own department's programs.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's homeless are set square in the public eye as a huddled mass of the drunk, drugged and mentally ill headed for Hades in a shopping cart. That is the short, misguided view of the visible minority. A truer, broader picture would be of the recovering homeless, who outnumber sidewalk sleepers 2-to-1, and for whom there are new and, one hopes, permanent exits from Skid Row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
You don't often find well-dressed people on Skid Row, but there Martha Brown Hicks is, striding down South San Pedro Street in an Oleg Cassini suit. When she became head of the fledgling Skid Row Development Corp. 10 years ago, she says: "People said to me you're going to have to change the way you dress." She pauses for a traffic light. "I said, 'Oh no I'm not.' People who know me know I love to dress. I like designer clothes.
NEWS
December 5, 1985
Dina Cramer, 38, has been appointed to the new post of city clerk-assistant to the city manager at a salary of $27,000 a year. Before coming to the city, Cramer was administrative coordinator with the Skid Row Development Corp. in downtown Los Angeles. Cramer said her duties will include preparation of City Council agendas, running municipal elections, handling personnel and developing a records management system. Cramer lives in Manhattan Beach with her husband and two children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1995
The Los Angeles City Council is helping to keep several Downtown social service programs afloat for another three months by turning over $1.3 million in funds that the beleaguered Community Redevelopment Agency is no longer able to provide. The money will enable the programs, whose CRA funding runs out July 1, to keep operating while the city tries to find other ways to help pay for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989
I am writing in review of the July 15 article (Part I) on the disgusting corruption at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Greed and personal gain took precedent over helping the poor and the homeless of this country. I knew (former HUD Secretary) Sam Pierce wasn't doing his job very well back in 1986. That was the year that he came to tape an interview for "Nightline" from Transition House, our award-winning medium-term shelter in downtown Los Angeles. I knew we were in trouble when he didn't understand his own department's programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1988
Without the process called "tax-increment financing," none of the very fine buildings we can be proud of would exist. Would our friends who are so critical of the CRA be content to sit idly by and watch our downtown deteriorate? Lifting the cap is vital if we are to accomplish any of the social services mentioned in the column. I believe it is commendable that Mayor Bradley proposes half of the money for low- and moderate-income housing and after-school day-care programs. Can't we realize that if the cap isn't lifted, none of this will occur?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1988
Your editorial "It's Outrageous" is itself outrageous. The "residents" had lived across from City Hall for six months, and, said your editorial, "heartlessly, thoughtlessly" these "helpless in our midst" had no place to go. Just this week (Metro, June 27) your staff writer, Penelope McMillan, wrote that such a program as Transition House has had little success with the hard-core homeless. They would never go to the shelter because it has too many "rules." Life has rules. When one flouts the rules of life, one can expect to get sick or, worse, die. So with the "rules" of society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
You don't often find well-dressed people on Skid Row, but there Martha Brown Hicks is, striding down South San Pedro Street in an Oleg Cassini suit. When she became head of the fledgling Skid Row Development Corp. 10 years ago, she says: "People said to me you're going to have to change the way you dress." She pauses for a traffic light. "I said, 'Oh no I'm not.' People who know me know I love to dress. I like designer clothes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989
The National League of Cities has named the Los Angeles-based Skid Row Development Corp. one of three winners of the James C. Howland Urban Enrichment Award for the nonprofit corporation's efforts to revitalize Skid Row. The group, which represented Los Angeles in the competition, will receive the award and a $1,000 prize at the league's annual meeting in Atlanta Nov. 29. In the under 50,000 category, Anniston, Ala. won. For populations 50,000 to 150,000 Boise, Ida.
OPINION
August 18, 2007
Re "Good signs downtown, but vision still lacking," column, Aug. 12 As usual, I agreed with most of what Steve Lopez had to say, but not all. One of my strongest objections was to his comment "that downtown will scare most people away until there's a commitment to build, and scatter across the region, enough supportive housing to clean up skid row once and for all." As creator of the Skid Row Development Corp.
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