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Skid Row Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People come and go on Los Angeles' skid row without much notice, but when 26 portable toilets disappeared from the sidewalks, it quickly became a very big deal. Since the toilets were hauled away Tuesday evening by the company that owns them, the homeless have been forced to use streets and alleys as bathrooms, skid row's leading toilet activist has leaped into action, and the mayor's office has gotten involved.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Breaking an informal nine-month truce, Los Angeles police officers have renewed their campaign to control the movements of the homeless men and women who populate Skid Row. In their latest strategy, police have undertaken to confine transients to the sidewalks in front of six missions rather than allowing them to range freely over the 50-block downtown district commonly called Skid Row.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outrage and fear came to a head for Maria Martinez the day her 6-year-old daughter picked up what she thought was a balloon and began blowing it up. It was a used condom. Horrifying but hardly uncommon in the skid row hotel on the edge of downtown Los Angeles where Martinez's struggling family has lived for years. Fed up with drug deals in the hallways and hookers plying their trade in adjoining rooms, Martinez--poor, uneducated and with limited English skills--decided to take on City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | Steve Hymon and Richard Winton
Defying Police Chief William J. Bratton and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday rejected a legal settlement that would have allowed homeless people to sleep on the sidewalks of skid row at night and permitted police to remove them during the day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2005 | Cara Mia DiMassa and Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writers
Four people were found dead on skid row Monday, a toll that shocked even veteran police and social workers who are used to seeing routine misfortune. None of the dead appeared to have been the victims of foul play. Three of the deaths were suspected to be the results of overdoses; the fourth victim wore a hospital band on one of his wrists and may have died of complications from stomach cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2005 | Steve Lopez
There is no such thing as skid row disease. But if there were, Lonnie Whitaker, 49, would have it bad. He hobbles into the office of Dr. Dennis Bleakley, lowers himself onto a chair and goes through the long list of what ails him. He has seizures, tested positive for TB, had hepatitis that might have been from a used needle, just got out of prison, hears voices and can barely walk. "From my hips all the way down to my feet, it's like it don't wanna wake up," Whitaker says, telling the doctor he was in a car accident four years ago and was initially diagnosed as paraplegic.
NEWS
July 9, 2002 | NOA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The four-block radius around downtown's San Julian and 5th streets is stage to some of the most desperate human drama in Los Angeles. But for two hours every Tuesday it also becomes the stage for old jazz standards. For a little more than a month now, Ravi Knypstra and Zane Musa have used their Mittenwald upright bass and soprano sax, respectively, to provide a musical oasis from the misery-soaked sidewalks of Skid Row. Missing from their routine is the usual busker's tip tin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2005 | Cara Mia DiMassa and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
The debate over what to do about the homeless problem in downtown Los Angeles is informed -- and complicated -- by the decidedly divergent views on the issue voiced by Los Angeles' two top law enforcement officials. When Sheriff Lee Baca talks about his goal of ending homelessness in Los Angeles County, he sounds more like an idealistic social worker than the head of the largest sheriff's department in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | John Horn
Hollywood loves to hold movie premieres in unusual places -- on aircraft carriers, in Disneyland, inside Alcatraz. Michael Moore decided to unveil his new healthcare documentary "Sicko" in a locale few studio executives have ever visited: skid row. On Monday night, Moore and distributor the Weinstein Co. screened "Sicko" on the street in front of the Union Rescue Mission. About 200 clients of the mission and other homeless people attended the screening, which included free popcorn and sodas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2007 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles city attorney Wednesday lambasted Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, saying it was deliberately blocking the release of medical records from a paraplegic man who was allegedly "dumped" last week in a skid row gutter. City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo said in a statement that a prosecutor had met with the victim, obtained his written consent for the release of records and forwarded the document to the hospital.
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