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NEWS
October 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton signed into law legislation increasing the number of visas available for skilled foreign workers, handing a victory to high-tech companies desperate for computer-savvy employees. Overwhelmingly approved by Congress earlier this month, the new law will increase the number of H-1B temporary visas available for high-tech workers and double the fee charged employers using the program.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
The real estate bust idled hundreds of thousands of construction workers. Now, with housing on the mend, builders are hiring again. Trouble is, many workers aren't coming back. Years of sporadic employment drove many from the industry. Incomes aren't what they used to be. Laid-off workers remember the sting of lost livelihoods; some have had enough of boom and bust. Former house painter Alan Schaffer has hung up his paintbrush to pursue a degree in business administration.
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NEWS
February 12, 1989
The United States faces a growing skilled labor shortage potentially more destructive to long-term economic health than the budget or trade deficits, an Economic Policy Institute report said. The authors of the report, "Workforce Policies for the 1990s," predicted there would be millions of unskilled and economically dependent young people ill-equipped to participate in a modern economy. The study was written by former Secretary of Labor F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
It had come down to bathing in a bucket in the rusted bathtub, illuminating every room with flashlights because the electric wiring was shot, and on days when the water heater malfunctioned, Leroy Price and Sunny Robinson would reach for their largest pot and boil water on the stove top. The 107-year-old Craftsman-style house that has been in Price's family for three generations was in severe disrepair after the roof began to leak a few years ago.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1991 | A. GARY SHILLING, A. GARY SHILLING is president of A. Gary Shilling & Co., a Springfield, N.J.-based economic consulting firm
Many economists have expressed fears that labor shortages--skilled labor shortages, in particular--will be serious in the next decade. They cite the slower growth of the labor force as the baby boom gives way to baby bust and that the pool of unemployed but employable older women is all but exhausted. But a hard look at demand for labor at all skill levels and supply of suitably educated workers shows these fears to be unjustified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a drought of talent to fill a rising number of skilled labor jobs, the state's community colleges may start sharing the cost of vocational education courses--from metal cutting to respiratory therapy--with private firms. A $72-million reform package that the state Community College Board of Governors is scheduled to consider today would work to reverse what trade educators call "vocational discrimination" against blue-collar training.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2007 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
When Casey Loyd was looking to expand his spa-manufacturing business three years ago, several other states aggressively courted him to leave Southern California. The offers were tempting, but the Southland's ample supply of skilled labor and his own fondness for the area led Loyd to keep Cal Spas in Pomona. "If I was a bean counter and I was in a publicly traded company, I probably would have gone," said Loyd, the company's president.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Japan, they're crying for telecommunications experts. China is scrambling for talented managers, while Malaysia needs technicians and engineers. The problem is even more basic in Thailand: Only 17% of the work force is educated beyond primary school, a liability likely to doom the nation to low-cost, labor-intensive industries unless corrected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2000
Betsy Ross has it all wrong, just like most Republicans (Commentary, March 10). We do not need to increase skilled immigrants. We need to improve our K-12 schools and colleges and provide more vocational training for kids after they finish high school, if they decide not to go on to college. Corporate America does a very poor job of offering training to young employees so that they can move up the ladder, or stay current on needed skills. In our dynamic global economy people will change careers many times because their skills or skilled jobs become obsolete, and on their own they must retrain for new skilled jobs.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. manufacturers say half of their current employees lack basic reading, writing and math skills, according to an industry survey released Friday. Although employers are investing more to educate and train their employees, a shortage of skilled workers seen since 1991 hasn't improved, said the study, conducted for the National Assn. of Manufacturers by the accounting firm Grant Thornton.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2007 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
When Casey Loyd was looking to expand his spa-manufacturing business three years ago, several other states aggressively courted him to leave Southern California. The offers were tempting, but the Southland's ample supply of skilled labor and his own fondness for the area led Loyd to keep Cal Spas in Pomona. "If I was a bean counter and I was in a publicly traded company, I probably would have gone," said Loyd, the company's president.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
From the small town of Toowoomba near Australia's Gold Coast, Dennis Davey is trolling the world for people to work in his 200-person engineering company. He has snared 15 workers from South Africa and 15 more from China. Some of the South Africans have already been poached away by the town's mining companies, so if the latest batch of Chinese works out, Davey says, he will bring over at least 50 more. "We have no choice," he said in a telephone interview. "We can't find any more people."
BUSINESS
October 3, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Unlike many New Orleans residents who lost their homes and cars, David Omar Rivera hasn't had any problem getting back to work. Last Thursday, Rivera put in a full 12-hour shift working on a massive military ship under construction here, and then walked down the plank to his bunk bed at "Kamp Katrina." As he laid his hard hat down on Bed 63, his temporary home, Rivera, 36, said: "Comparatively speaking, with what a lot of people have to deal with in this area, my accommodations are superb."
BUSINESS
September 4, 2005 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
The massive Hurricane Katrina rebuilding effort -- expected to be among the biggest and costliest ever -- will be even more expensive thanks to the nation's housing boom. The rebuilding will create new demands for building materials and construction workers, already in short supply because of strong home-building activity around the country. That could result in even higher costs for those goods and workers, which in turn could further boost prices for new homes in California and elsewhere.
REAL ESTATE
August 21, 2005 | Dinah Eng, Special to The Times
Finding a good contractor to do a small job in a timely fashion these days is like meeting your soul mate on a blind date. Not impossible, but highly unlikely. With all the remodeling being done across the Southland, it's often hard to get a contractor to even return a phone call. Factor in winter's heavy rains, which delayed building projects everywhere, and there is no shortage of frustrated, unhappy homeowners.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, no one would mistake the converted airplane hangar that sits under the flight path into Los Angeles International Airport for a Hollywood Dream Factory, but in a sense it is.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
The county's educational and business communities are unprepared to handle the demographic changes that will sweep the work force of the 1990s, the president of a statewide public-interest group said Friday at Chapman College. The needs of business and the skills of most workers are mismatched, said Linda Wong, president of California Tomorrow, a nonprofit social-policy research group concerned with multicultural issues. By the year 2000, fewer than 7% of all U.S.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | PAULINE M. MILLARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Amanda Wilson says that a lot of people tried to talk her out of enrolling in a vocational school two years ago. At her old high school in Hamilton, Ohio, she earned a 4.0 grade-point average. She was told that a bright student such as herself should stay on the academic course--and continue to excel. "Everyone said to me, 'Why are you going to do that? You're doing so well here,' " she says. "But I knew that I wanted to work in the medical field, and I wanted to get a head start."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a drought of talent to fill a rising number of skilled labor jobs, the state's community colleges may start sharing the cost of vocational education courses--from metal cutting to respiratory therapy--with private firms. A $72-million reform package that the state Community College Board of Governors is scheduled to consider today would work to reverse what trade educators call "vocational discrimination" against blue-collar training.
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