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Skills Gap

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2002 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education unanimously approved a resolution this week requiring Supt. Roy Romer to create a plan within six months to close the academic achievement gap separating African American and Latino students from their Asian and white peers. "If you measure it with standardized tests, more African American and Latino students are failing reading and math," board member Jose Huizar said.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
It all started with the Kingston Trio. One day in 1963, a San Diego kid and his friends got their hands on an album by the popular folk group. Greg Deering, 12 at the time, recalls studying the musicians on the cover and thinking, "I've got to get a banjo" - not out of love for the twangy instrument but mainly because his pal already had a guitar. Fifty years later, Greg, his wife, Janet, and daughter Jamie preside over the bestselling banjo-making business in the U.S. From a small Spring Valley factory, the Deering Banjo Co. is having its best year ever, defying the U.S. skills gap and California's manufacturing doldrums.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The "digital divide" has been back in the news recently--but, as usual, only briefly. On July 8, the Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration released its latest report in a series called "Falling Through the Net." This is an ongoing study of telephone, computer and Internet use in the U.S. that can be viewed at http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/digitaldivide. In it, the government reported (using 1998 data) that 40% of U.S.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
U.S. manufacturing industry executives have bemoaned a skills gap in the nation's workforce, but a new report says the shortfall isn't a big deal - yet. By the end of the decade, the shortage of highly skilled workers could balloon to 875,000 from 80,000 to 100,000 workers now, according to a study from Boston Consulting Group. The current deficiency of workers represents less than 1% of the 11.5 million total factory workers in the country, according to the consulting group.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
It all started with the Kingston Trio. One day in 1963, a San Diego kid and his friends got their hands on an album by the popular folk group. Greg Deering, 12 at the time, recalls studying the musicians on the cover and thinking, "I've got to get a banjo" - not out of love for the twangy instrument but mainly because his pal already had a guitar. Fifty years later, Greg, his wife, Janet, and daughter Jamie preside over the bestselling banjo-making business in the U.S. From a small Spring Valley factory, the Deering Banjo Co. is having its best year ever, defying the U.S. skills gap and California's manufacturing doldrums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000
Helping to raise the wages of those people who are stuck at the bottom of the income scale is a noble and worthwhile pursuit ("Living Wage Advocates Take on NoHo Project," Dec. 12). But the plan to force employers to pay a "living wage" of $8.97 per hour to low-skilled workers is off target and would hurt the entry-level employees the Valley Jobs Coalition seek to help. Mandating wage hikes--either through federal decree or some complex scheme--does not ensure that the people at the bottom rung of the ladder will have an easier climb out of poverty to higher paying jobs.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The skills gap that has the U.S. manufacturing industry panicked isn't a big deal for now, according to a new report from the Boston Consulting Group. But by the end of the decade, the shortage could balloon to 875,000 highly skilled workers from a shortfall of 80,000 to 100,000 now, according to the study . Today, the deficit of workers represents less than 1% of the 11.5 million total factory workers in the country, or less than 8% of the 1.4 million highly skilled employees.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
U.S. manufacturing industry executives have bemoaned a skills gap in the nation's workforce, but a new report says the shortfall isn't a big deal - yet. By the end of the decade, the shortage of highly skilled workers could balloon to 875,000 from 80,000 to 100,000 workers now, according to a study from Boston Consulting Group. The current deficiency of workers represents less than 1% of the 11.5 million total factory workers in the country, according to the consulting group.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2007 | Tina Marie Macias, Times Staff Writer
Math skills among fourth- and eighth-graders are showing steady improvement and fourth-graders' reading scores are also rising, according to a federal report released Tuesday. But white students are still scoring far higher than African American and Hispanic students on a standardized assessment of academic proficiency, and that achievement gap is most prominent in California.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Pledging to close "the skills gap," President Clinton proposed nearly $1 billion in new and increased spending Thursday to retrain dislocated workers, teach illiterate adults to read and increase job opportunities for disadvantaged youth.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The skills gap that has the U.S. manufacturing industry panicked isn't a big deal for now, according to a new report from the Boston Consulting Group. But by the end of the decade, the shortage could balloon to 875,000 highly skilled workers from a shortfall of 80,000 to 100,000 now, according to the study . Today, the deficit of workers represents less than 1% of the 11.5 million total factory workers in the country, or less than 8% of the 1.4 million highly skilled employees.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2007 | Tina Marie Macias, Times Staff Writer
Math skills among fourth- and eighth-graders are showing steady improvement and fourth-graders' reading scores are also rising, according to a federal report released Tuesday. But white students are still scoring far higher than African American and Hispanic students on a standardized assessment of academic proficiency, and that achievement gap is most prominent in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2002 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education unanimously approved a resolution this week requiring Supt. Roy Romer to create a plan within six months to close the academic achievement gap separating African American and Latino students from their Asian and white peers. "If you measure it with standardized tests, more African American and Latino students are failing reading and math," board member Jose Huizar said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000
Helping to raise the wages of those people who are stuck at the bottom of the income scale is a noble and worthwhile pursuit ("Living Wage Advocates Take on NoHo Project," Dec. 12). But the plan to force employers to pay a "living wage" of $8.97 per hour to low-skilled workers is off target and would hurt the entry-level employees the Valley Jobs Coalition seek to help. Mandating wage hikes--either through federal decree or some complex scheme--does not ensure that the people at the bottom rung of the ladder will have an easier climb out of poverty to higher paying jobs.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The "digital divide" has been back in the news recently--but, as usual, only briefly. On July 8, the Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration released its latest report in a series called "Falling Through the Net." This is an ongoing study of telephone, computer and Internet use in the U.S. that can be viewed at http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/digitaldivide. In it, the government reported (using 1998 data) that 40% of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to complaints from employers that they cannot find workers with the skills to fill an increasingly technical job market, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a $300,000 survey of San Fernando Valley businesses to combat what leaders see as a critical problem. Lawmakers and business leaders say the skills gap is a regionwide concern that has made it difficult for Southern California to keep and attract high-paying jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1997
So Karen Grigsby Bates (Commentary, Dec. 10) extols the impressive influence of black deejay Tom Joyner's power to pressure Christie's auction house to pull the sale of pre-Civil War posters once used to advertise slave sales. She exudes praise for his influence to mobilize interest about important issues facing the "black com- munity." As a black person my question is: When are the likes of Bates and Joyner going to use their influence to alert black Americans that the leading cause of death of young black men is homicide (blacks killing blacks)
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