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NEWS
April 22, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL
* A-frame: the peak formed when a side wave meets an incoming wave * Bedrock: rocks exposed on a normally sandy beach * Charging: skimming well or aggressively (also: going off ) * Doghouse: a wave that ends by churning in the same spot because of the beach geography. Usage: "I got caught in the doghouse and couldn't do anything with it."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
Sprinting toward the surf, Shonna Cobb flings a fiberglass board onto the wet sand. With a springy assurance, she leaps atop the narrow 4-foot-long board and glides into an approaching wave. In the seconds that follow, she will have to calculate the wave's advance and the body movements required to sustain enough speed and balance to skim over its 4-foot face and into the air. There is no soft landing. She completes the acrobatic trick, then falls into the receding shallow water at Balboa Beach, absorbing the impact with a tuck-and-roll motion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2002 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
As one of skimboarding's pioneers flatly admits, his sport is about 25 years behind surfing in terms of popularity. But as skimboarding gains converts each day from other new board sports, Tex Haines believes the gap is closing quickly. "You only have to look ahead to see skimboarding is a fun sport that has even more potential than surfing, because you can do it almost everywhere," said Haines, owner of Victoria Skimboards in Laguna Beach.
NEWS
September 27, 2005
I lived at the Laguna Beach cove mentioned in your skimboarding story, "Launching Into View" [Sept. 20], from 1956 to '58. In those days, we rode our plywood "skidboards" straight or on a slight angle. I will never forget the sound of riding over the backs of hundreds of sand crabs. That was when you went the fastest. ALLAN SEYMOUR Capistrano Beach Growing up in Santa Cruz, I found skimboarding to be the perfect blend of high-speed skate smash and saltwater buzz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
Sprinting toward the surf, Shonna Cobb flings a fiberglass board onto the wet sand. With a springy assurance, she leaps atop the narrow 4-foot-long board and glides into an approaching wave. In the seconds that follow, she will have to calculate the wave's advance and the body movements required to sustain enough speed and balance to skim over its 4-foot face and into the air. There is no soft landing. She completes the acrobatic trick, then falls into the receding shallow water at Balboa Beach, absorbing the impact with a tuck-and-roll motion.
SPORTS
August 27, 1989 | MARTIN BECK
The surfer is one of those essential California icons. A figure of almost mythical stature, the surfer is to the West Coast what the cowboy was to the Old West. But the cowboy's domain wasn't as crowded as the California surf. "Get off my wave" was never heard out on the range. And for selling swim trunks and other accouterments of the beach life style, the surfer has no peer.
NEWS
September 27, 2005
I lived at the Laguna Beach cove mentioned in your skimboarding story, "Launching Into View" [Sept. 20], from 1956 to '58. In those days, we rode our plywood "skidboards" straight or on a slight angle. I will never forget the sound of riding over the backs of hundreds of sand crabs. That was when you went the fastest. ALLAN SEYMOUR Capistrano Beach Growing up in Santa Cruz, I found skimboarding to be the perfect blend of high-speed skate smash and saltwater buzz.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask people to name a sport that takes place on land, water and air, often in the space of a single second, and even sports experts might be stumped. But any visitor to South Laguna's Aliso Beach knows the answer: skim-boarding, a high-energy pastime that epitomizes the interplay of youthful exuberance, sand and surf. With grace and recklessness in equal measure, skim-boarders attack the Aliso shore break relentlessly, carving it up to create elegant rooster tails of water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking a compromise between bodysurfers and those who ride waves on knee boards, skim boards or surfboards of any kind, the City Council voted Monday night to restrict but not ban boards at the Wedge, a world-renowned surfing spot. Saying the ocean belongs to everybody, the council rejected a request by a group of bodysurfers to ban boards from the Wedge 24 hours a day, year-round. Instead, the council voted 4 to 2 to reserve the Wedge for bodysurfers from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1987 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
As a dark swell swept past Aliso Pier in South Laguna, three young men raced toward it, carrying their fiberglass boards ahead of them like spears. Suddenly they threw the boards onto the wet sand, jumped on them and sailed off the beach and into a two-foot wave. Two of them executed perfect U-turns or "wrap-arounds" in the small wave, but the third wasn't so lucky. He smacked head-on into the wave and, arms flailing, was hurled sideways into shallow water.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | Joe Robinson, Joe Robinson can be reached at joe.robinson@latimes.com.
TUCKED in a secluded cove off the surf track in Laguna Beach, maverick swell stalkers jockey for waves, which they'll catch, not by paddling but by sprinting smack into them. It's surfing as head-on collision, using a device that for most arbiters of studly endeavor has been about as daring as a bike with training wheels -- the skimboard. The leader of the kamikaze pack, wiry, tousle-haired Bill Bryan, 32, studies the incoming ridges, then bolts for the surf as if chased by an enraged rhino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2002 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
As one of skimboarding's pioneers flatly admits, his sport is about 25 years behind surfing in terms of popularity. But as skimboarding gains converts each day from other new board sports, Tex Haines believes the gap is closing quickly. "You only have to look ahead to see skimboarding is a fun sport that has even more potential than surfing, because you can do it almost everywhere," said Haines, owner of Victoria Skimboards in Laguna Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking a compromise between bodysurfers and those who ride waves on knee boards, skim boards or surfboards of any kind, the City Council voted Monday night to restrict but not ban boards at the Wedge, a world-renowned surfing spot. Saying the ocean belongs to everybody, the council rejected a request by a group of bodysurfers to ban boards from the Wedge 24 hours a day, year-round. Instead, the council voted 4 to 2 to reserve the Wedge for bodysurfers from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL
* A-frame: the peak formed when a side wave meets an incoming wave * Bedrock: rocks exposed on a normally sandy beach * Charging: skimming well or aggressively (also: going off ) * Doghouse: a wave that ends by churning in the same spot because of the beach geography. Usage: "I got caught in the doghouse and couldn't do anything with it."
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask people to name a sport that takes place on land, water and air, often in the space of a single second, and even sports experts might be stumped. But any visitor to South Laguna's Aliso Beach knows the answer: skim-boarding, a high-energy pastime that epitomizes the interplay of youthful exuberance, sand and surf. With grace and recklessness in equal measure, skim-boarders attack the Aliso shore break relentlessly, carving it up to create elegant rooster tails of water.
SPORTS
August 27, 1989 | MARTIN BECK
The surfer is one of those essential California icons. A figure of almost mythical stature, the surfer is to the West Coast what the cowboy was to the Old West. But the cowboy's domain wasn't as crowded as the California surf. "Get off my wave" was never heard out on the range. And for selling swim trunks and other accouterments of the beach life style, the surfer has no peer.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | Joe Robinson, Joe Robinson can be reached at joe.robinson@latimes.com.
TUCKED in a secluded cove off the surf track in Laguna Beach, maverick swell stalkers jockey for waves, which they'll catch, not by paddling but by sprinting smack into them. It's surfing as head-on collision, using a device that for most arbiters of studly endeavor has been about as daring as a bike with training wheels -- the skimboard. The leader of the kamikaze pack, wiry, tousle-haired Bill Bryan, 32, studies the incoming ridges, then bolts for the surf as if chased by an enraged rhino.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Dallas Jamison and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times, Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Location: Coast Highway, opposite 9th Avenue, South Laguna. Description: This short stretch of sandy beach is reached by a long stairway from the top of the bluff. Activities: Skim-boarding, swimming and fishing are popular pastimes. Facilities: Lifeguards; restrooms with showers. Rules: Dogs, fires not allowed on the beach. Hours: Daily, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fee: None. Parking: Metered parking available on bluff-top streets. Mass transit: OCTD Route 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1987 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
As a dark swell swept past Aliso Pier in South Laguna, three young men raced toward it, carrying their fiberglass boards ahead of them like spears. Suddenly they threw the boards onto the wet sand, jumped on them and sailed off the beach and into a two-foot wave. Two of them executed perfect U-turns or "wrap-arounds" in the small wave, but the third wasn't so lucky. He smacked head-on into the wave and, arms flailing, was hurled sideways into shallow water.
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