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Skin Cancer

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NEWS
November 29, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Skin cancer rates are rising in the United States despite the well-known warnings to use sunscreen and avoid excessive sun exposure. There may be another tool to guard against non-melanoma skin cancers, however. A study released Monday shows the painkiller celecoxib -- or Celebrex -- helped prevent skin cancers in patients with precancerous lesions. Celebrex is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (or NSAID) that is used most often for arthritis pain. Researchers have long pondered its potential effectiveness as a cancer therapy.
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SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Dan Loumena
Mike Schmidt, perhaps the greatest third baseman in baseball history and a harsh critic of players using performance-enhancing drugs, sat down with reporters Saturday to discuss his recovery from skin cancer. "I'm a very lucky man," said the former Philadelphia Phillies slugger and Hall of Famer about his battle with stage 3 melanoma. “I've done just about everything I can to destroy the cancer cells in my body.” The 64-year-old had two operations and went through the usual rounds of chemotherapy and radiation treatments.
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NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Scientists reported Monday that drinking coffee was associated with decreased risk of a common and slow-growing form of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma.  It appears that caffeine may play a role, they said. The team, based at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, presented their study at the American Assn. for Cancer Research International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.   Examining data from the Nurses' Health Study, which followed 72,921 people between 1984 and 2008, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, which followed 39,976 people between 1986 and 2008, they found 25,480 skin cancer cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Hugh Jackman could use some Wolverine-like regeneration right about now: The "X-Men" actor revealed Thursday that he'd had skin cancer removed from his nose. Jackman posted a photo of himself with a biggish nose bandage on Instagram with a warning to his fans. " Deb said to get the mark on my nose checked. Boy, was she right! I had a [basal] cell carcinoma," he wrote in the photo caption.  "Please don't be foolish like me. Get yourself checked.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Hugh Jackman could use some Wolverine-like regeneration right about now: The "X-Men" actor revealed Thursday that he'd had skin cancer removed from his nose. Jackman posted a photo of himself with a biggish nose bandage on Instagram with a warning to his fans. " Deb said to get the mark on my nose checked. Boy, was she right! I had a [basal] cell carcinoma," he wrote in the photo caption.  "Please don't be foolish like me. Get yourself checked.
NEWS
May 29, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers may help protect against skin cancer , according to a new research article. The findings, reported in the journal Cancer, were made after scientists looked at 19 years of skin cancer records in northern Denmark and compared the rates of skin cancer in those who took one or more of these drugs with those who didn't. The scientists at Aarhus University Hospital and two California institutions (the Cancer Prevention Institute in Fremont and Stanford University School of Medicine)
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Has your doctor ever advised you to use sunscreen? Chances are, the answer is no. In fact, out of 18.3 billion doctor visits over nearly 21 years, sunscreen was recommended to patients only 12.83 million times, a new study finds. That works out to only 0.07% of visits. OK, you're thinking, surely doctors did a better job when they were seeing patients for a skin-related disease like melanoma or actinic keratosis . And indeed, they were 12 times more likely to mention sunscreen to these patients.
IMAGE
July 24, 2011 | By Alexandra Drosu, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer heats up, we've learned to slather SPF 15 or higher all over our bodies and faces in an effort to prevent sun damage and skin cancer. We've also been told to recite our ABCs when checking for unusual moles: asymmetry, border irregularity and uneven color. Unfortunately, our scalps are often neglected. Sunscreen is transparent on skin, but who wants to go to work with greasy roots? How many people wear a hat during their lunch break? And who can see a mole on top of her own head?
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Dan Loumena
Mike Schmidt, perhaps the greatest third baseman in baseball history and a harsh critic of players using performance-enhancing drugs, sat down with reporters Saturday to discuss his recovery from skin cancer. "I'm a very lucky man," said the former Philadelphia Phillies slugger and Hall of Famer about his battle with stage 3 melanoma. “I've done just about everything I can to destroy the cancer cells in my body.” The 64-year-old had two operations and went through the usual rounds of chemotherapy and radiation treatments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1991
Free skin cancer screenings will be held at the Skin Cancer Institute through May 31 in conjunction with National Melanoma / Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. The screenings are part of a national program that promotes prevention and early detection. Examinations at the following locations are by appointment only. LOCATION ADDRESS TIME PHONE NUMBER Beverly Hills 435 N. Roxbury Drive, 8-11:30 a.m. Saturdays Suite 210 (213) 858-7891 Encino 16260 Ventura Blvd., 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Death is universal, inevitable, irrevocable and profound, and yet even in our reality-fixated times, it is rarely depicted on television. Oh, people die all the time on TV. They fall victim to detective procedurals and hospital dramas, or are killed off on high-end serials looking to raise the emotional stakes. These days, many come back - with or without fangs, with or without subtitles. But the process of dying, the visible physical ebb of life from a person's body, is not a narrative television cares to explore.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Has your doctor ever advised you to use sunscreen? Chances are, the answer is no. In fact, out of 18.3 billion doctor visits over nearly 21 years, sunscreen was recommended to patients only 12.83 million times, a new study finds. That works out to only 0.07% of visits. OK, you're thinking, surely doctors did a better job when they were seeing patients for a skin-related disease like melanoma or actinic keratosis . And indeed, they were 12 times more likely to mention sunscreen to these patients.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
“Tanning kills,” warns Travis Kidner, a skin cancer surgeon, in a recent Times Op-Ed article advising against tanning beds. Still, tanning salons continue to attract customers, many of whom are young, white women undeterred by the dangerous risks. Science Now's Karen Kaplan reported : “The latest evidence comes from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a research letter published online Monday by JAMA Internal Medicine, they report that 29.3% of white high school girls went to an indoor tanning parlor at least once a year, and 16.7% went 'frequently' -- at least 10 times in a 12-month period.
SCIENCE
August 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Indoor tanning is a great way to get skin cancer - especially if you start young. People who use tanning beds, sunlamps or tanning booths before age 35 are up to 75% more likely to develop melanoma, and those who begin before 25 may double their risk of other types of skin cancer. So we are once again surprised to to find that indoor tanning remains popular with the young women whose fair skin makes them the most vulnerable to the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation. The latest evidence comes from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
OPINION
August 5, 2013 | By Travis Kidner
As a surgical oncologist, I'm usually the one delivering the bad news. But this time I was the recipient. Nine days earlier, my dermatologist had taken a biopsy from a small pink dot on my back, and now the results were available. It was, he told me, malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. I envisioned the irony of my obituary: "Melanoma surgeon dies of melanoma. " Specializing in the care of melanoma patients makes me all too aware of the facts. I know that melanoma is one of only a few cancers whose incidence is increasing.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Alene Dawson
Summer officially starts on Friday and no matter how old you are, the season still beckons your inner kid with play, adventure and freedom . Just don't let grown-up, self-conscious worries zap the fun. Swimmer, 12-time Olympic medalist and California girl Natalie Coughlin shares tips on how to shake off hot-weather beauty fears and dive deep into summer with confidence.  Use sunscreen no matter what Coughlin is grounded, warm and engaging -- a bronzy, blue-eyed beauty who is as lithe as she is fit with a cascade of light-brown highlighted hair and nary a sunspot to be seen.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Heart transplant patients are four to 30 times as likely to develop skin cancer as healthy people, depending on where they live and other factors, researchers said Thursday. Patients who live nearer the equator and have fairer skin are the most likely to suffer skin cancers and to die from them, the researchers reported in the American Journal of Transplantation. Transplant patients in general have an above-normal risk of developing cancer because of the need to use immunosuppressive drugs to prevent the transplant from being rejected.
NEWS
December 21, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Are tanning beds still popular? Apparently so. A new study finds 18% of women and 6.5% of men in America say they use tanning beds, even though indoor tanning has been linked to an increased risk of skin cancer. Researchers at the University of Minnesota based their findings on surveys of 2,869 white people between age 18 and 64 who were asked about their recent indoor tanning habits. In addition, the study says, most didn’t know that using tanning beds could increase their chances of getting skin cancer.
HEALTH
June 8, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
So, there you are in the sunscreen aisle, where the number of products on the shelves is approximately equal to the number of grains of sand on a beach. How to choose? Read the labels. Your decision may still not be easy, but new labeling regulations should help. "The new regulations will make a significant difference," says Latanya Benjamin, a dermatologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University. "They standardize the basics of what to look for in a sunscreen.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
As if reducing the threat of skin cancer was not enough, scientists report that they have shown using sunscreen daily can slow the signs of aging skin -- even into middle age. Skin ages as people age, obviously. The sun is a major culprit in the skin's deterioration. Signs include wrinkles, of course, but also deterioration in texture and an increase in visible blood vessels. Scientists from Queensland Institute of Medical Research and other institutions divided 903 Australians 55 years old and younger into groups who used sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 daily -- on face, neck, arms and hands -- and those who did so at their own discretion.
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