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Skin Cancer Foundation

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NEWS
June 28, 2000 | Associated Press
From July 9 to 22, Shiseido cosmetics will conduct a program to raise both awareness of skin cancer and funds for its prevention and cure. The consumer protection and awareness program, to be conducted in department and specialty stores, will contribute 5% of all Shiseido Cosmetics product sales to the Skin Cancer Foundation during the promotion period.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
Splashing in the surf and soaking up rays are just a part of life in the summertime: We take an average of 2 billion trips to the beach every year in America. While most of those trips end with the kids packing up seashells (and tons of sand) to take home, some end in tragedy. An average of 10 people a day die of unintentional drowning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional death in the United States, with children ages 1 to 4 at the greatest risk.
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HEALTH
May 9, 2011 | Jill U. Adams
Late last month, doctors removed a cancerous growth from Gov. Jerry Brown's nose. The diagnosis was basal cell carcinoma, a common skin cancer that is very treatable and only rarely spreads elsewhere in the body. It is not the same as melanoma, which is a less common but deadlier skin cancer. "I think one of the biggest misunderstandings about skin cancer is the difference between melanoma and non-melanoma," says Dr. Lisa Chipps, an L.A.-based dermatologist and educational spokeswoman for the Skin Cancer Foundation, a national awareness group based in New York City.
HEALTH
May 9, 2011 | Jill U. Adams
Late last month, doctors removed a cancerous growth from Gov. Jerry Brown's nose. The diagnosis was basal cell carcinoma, a common skin cancer that is very treatable and only rarely spreads elsewhere in the body. It is not the same as melanoma, which is a less common but deadlier skin cancer. "I think one of the biggest misunderstandings about skin cancer is the difference between melanoma and non-melanoma," says Dr. Lisa Chipps, an L.A.-based dermatologist and educational spokeswoman for the Skin Cancer Foundation, a national awareness group based in New York City.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1991
In response to the article "Burning Debate on Foundation's Sunscreen Role" (July 4) about the Skin Cancer Foundation's seal of recommendation for sunscreens, I would like to clarify the procedures by which the seal is awarded. The seal certifies that a sunscreen product has been submitted by its manufacturer for testing by a reputable scientific laboratory and that such testing has been verified by the foundation's committee of independent photobiologists. To qualify for the seal, a product must conform with the foundation's stringent criteria for safety and efficacy, which meet and exceed the guidelines of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit outfit named the Skin Cancer Foundation has the sunscreen business sealed up. Take a look at any sunscreen container; chances are it bears the foundation's "seal of recommendation." The foundation president, Dr. Perry Robins, said the seal "lets the public know the sunscreen works." To critics, the seal smacks more of marketing than medicine. The foundation charges corporations $10,000 for it.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
Splashing in the surf and soaking up rays are just a part of life in the summertime: We take an average of 2 billion trips to the beach every year in America. While most of those trips end with the kids packing up seashells (and tons of sand) to take home, some end in tragedy. An average of 10 people a day die of unintentional drowning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional death in the United States, with children ages 1 to 4 at the greatest risk.
TRAVEL
June 23, 2002 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, Healthy Traveler appears twice a month. The writer can be reached at kathleendoheny@earthlink.net.
If you're leaving on vacation and haven't shopped for sunscreen lately, allow some extra time. Besides the familiar lotions, you can buy sunscreen as spray, gel or stick. Some sprays and lotions change colors when rubbed in, a feature most often found in products aimed at kids. Lotion may have built-in glitter or insect repellent. Self-tanners sometimes include sunscreen.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | GAILE ROBINSON
What could be more natural than children playing in the sunshine? Or more risky? By the time they reach age 18, most children will have received 80% of their lifetime sun exposure. One in 10 will eventually develop some form of skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Last year, 500,000 new cases were diagnosed; some of the patients were children. Parents can protect their children from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays in one of two ways: clothing or sunscreen.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
* Plan outdoor activities for early morning or late afternoon. The sun is strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. * When out in the sun, wear a hat, as well as long-sleeved shirts and long pants made of tightly woven materials. * Use a sunscreen before going outside and reapply every two hours while you're in the sun. Also reapply after swimming or sweating heavily. * Don't be a tightwad when applying sunscreen; don't forget to include your ears, lips and nose.
IMAGE
June 17, 2007 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
IT used to be so simple. When we needed a sunscreen, we picked either the brown bottle, or the other brown bottle. As long as it said SPF 15 or more, we knew we'd be safe. Or so we thought. As we learn more about how the sun affects the skin, sun care experts are hoping to teach us that not all rays are alike and neither are sunscreens. Some ultraviolet rays (UVBs) coming from the sun cause burning.
TRAVEL
June 23, 2002 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, Healthy Traveler appears twice a month. The writer can be reached at kathleendoheny@earthlink.net.
If you're leaving on vacation and haven't shopped for sunscreen lately, allow some extra time. Besides the familiar lotions, you can buy sunscreen as spray, gel or stick. Some sprays and lotions change colors when rubbed in, a feature most often found in products aimed at kids. Lotion may have built-in glitter or insect repellent. Self-tanners sometimes include sunscreen.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | Associated Press
From July 9 to 22, Shiseido cosmetics will conduct a program to raise both awareness of skin cancer and funds for its prevention and cure. The consumer protection and awareness program, to be conducted in department and specialty stores, will contribute 5% of all Shiseido Cosmetics product sales to the Skin Cancer Foundation during the promotion period.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
* Plan outdoor activities for early morning or late afternoon. The sun is strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. * When out in the sun, wear a hat, as well as long-sleeved shirts and long pants made of tightly woven materials. * Use a sunscreen before going outside and reapply every two hours while you're in the sun. Also reapply after swimming or sweating heavily. * Don't be a tightwad when applying sunscreen; don't forget to include your ears, lips and nose.
TRAVEL
July 9, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Whether her patients plan to mountain bike in Utah, beachcomb in Hawaii or sightsee in New York City, Santa Monica dermatologist Kathleen Adair offers the same advice as when they're not traveling: Use sunscreen and cover up. But that's just the beginning. Travelers hoping to avoid painful sunburn and lower their risk of skin cancer must tailor preventive measures to their destinations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1993 | MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people drive by a beach lined with bodies tanning under the summer sun and see the ultimate expression of Southern California's hedonistic lifestyle. Dermatologists such as Dr. Daniel Gross see future patients. "I think to myself, 'Geez, why would people do that, hurt their skin?' " he said. "I have absolutely no desire to lay on the beach and damage my skin. I'm too busy treating all the problems."
IMAGE
June 17, 2007 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
IT used to be so simple. When we needed a sunscreen, we picked either the brown bottle, or the other brown bottle. As long as it said SPF 15 or more, we knew we'd be safe. Or so we thought. As we learn more about how the sun affects the skin, sun care experts are hoping to teach us that not all rays are alike and neither are sunscreens. Some ultraviolet rays (UVBs) coming from the sun cause burning.
TRAVEL
July 9, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Whether her patients plan to mountain bike in Utah, beachcomb in Hawaii or sightsee in New York City, Santa Monica dermatologist Kathleen Adair offers the same advice as when they're not traveling: Use sunscreen and cover up. But that's just the beginning. Travelers hoping to avoid painful sunburn and lower their risk of skin cancer must tailor preventive measures to their destinations.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1991
In response to the article "Burning Debate on Foundation's Sunscreen Role" (July 4) about the Skin Cancer Foundation's seal of recommendation for sunscreens, I would like to clarify the procedures by which the seal is awarded. The seal certifies that a sunscreen product has been submitted by its manufacturer for testing by a reputable scientific laboratory and that such testing has been verified by the foundation's committee of independent photobiologists. To qualify for the seal, a product must conform with the foundation's stringent criteria for safety and efficacy, which meet and exceed the guidelines of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | GAILE ROBINSON
What could be more natural than children playing in the sunshine? Or more risky? By the time they reach age 18, most children will have received 80% of their lifetime sun exposure. One in 10 will eventually develop some form of skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Last year, 500,000 new cases were diagnosed; some of the patients were children. Parents can protect their children from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays in one of two ways: clothing or sunscreen.
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