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SPORTS
November 8, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Trainer Sonny Hine would have liked to believe it wasn't an omen when debris from a United Parcel Service 747 ascending from Louisville International Airport fell in the early-morning hours Wednesday on the roof of Barn 36, disturbing his $9-million horse, Skip Away, from a restful sleep. But Hine couldn't ignore the possibility. Unlike some of his horses, he doesn't wear blinkers.
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SPORTS
March 18, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colorful Sonny Hine, the trainer who bought Skip Away, a problematic, unraced colt, for $22,500 and retired him four years later with a horse-of-the-year title and near-record earnings of $9.6 million, died Friday at a hospital in Miami. Hine, 69, had been diagnosed with cancer in 1996. He died of complications of pneumonia after having been admitted to Jackson Memorial Hospital a week ago.
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SPORTS
June 29, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Great horses should have names that inspire visions of greatness. They should have names like Man O' War, Assault, Spectacular Bid or Bold Whatever. When you hear of a horse named Secretariat, you imagine the leader of the United Nations or the Politburo. When you hear Cigar, you imagine powerful men with sleeves rolled up and ties loosened while deciding the fate of the nation in a smoke-filled room.
SPORTS
February 17, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1997, Skip Away won the Breeders' Cup Classic but was beaten out by the 2-year-old Favorite Trick for horse-of-the-year honors. In 1998, Skip Away was beaten in the Breeders' Cup, but won the title by a landslide as voters recognized his seven-race winning streak through the first nine months of the year. Skip Away, as a 5-year-old campaigned by Carolyn Hine and her husband, trainer Sonny Hine, collected 193 votes, almost 83% of the 233 cast.
SPORTS
November 6, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE
One day Skip Away's barn is showered with engine debris from an airplane in distress. The next day Skip Away drops his exercise rider and runs off. What next before Saturday's Breeders' Cup Classic at Churchill Downs, a horse-napping by Martians? Skip Away's latest potential catastrophe occurred during a morning gallop Thursday. Trainer Sonny Hine's horse unseated Clemente Sanchez, continued for about 10 yards, then stopped to look around, practically inviting another horseman to apprehend him.
SPORTS
November 7, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Bob Baffert says that if Silver Charm runs the way he has looked this week, his horse will win the Breeders' Cup Classic. "But if he runs the way I feel, then we're in trouble," Baffert said, alluding to how social and professional considerations, along with general pre-race jitters, can overwhelm a trainer in the days before what has become the world's richest race.
SPORTS
November 5, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after Wednesday's decision had been made, R.D. Hubbard was standing in front of his trainer's barn at Churchill Downs when his cellular phone rang. "We're going in the Classic," the chairman of Hollywood Park said. "Yeah, we've decided to take a shot." After Hubbard put the phone away, he said that he was talking to Johnny Jones, the owner of Walmac International, the Lexington, Ky., farm where Gentlemen will stand at stud next year.
SPORTS
February 17, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1997, Skip Away won the Breeders' Cup Classic but was beaten out by the 2-year-old Favorite Trick for horse-of-the-year honors. In 1998, Skip Away was beaten in the Breeders' Cup, but won the title by a landslide as voters recognized his seven-race winning streak through the first nine months of the year. Skip Away, as a 5-year-old campaigned by Carolyn Hine and her husband, trainer Sonny Hine, collected 193 votes, almost 83% of the 233 cast.
SPORTS
December 28, 1998 | ANDREW BEYER, WASHINGTON POST
Balloting for the 1998 Eclipse Award winners has begun, and voters ought to have little trouble making the right choice between Skip Away and Awesome Again for the horse of the year. Skip Away, of course, had a distinguished season, winning seven straight stakes races before fading at the end of the year and losing his last two starts. Awesome Again compiled a six-for-six record and finished the year with a victory in the $5.
SPORTS
October 13, 1996 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prepare for Skip Away-Cigar II at the Breeders' Cup on Oct. 26 at Woodbine. Trainer Sonny Hine said Saturday that he and wife Carolyn, who owns Skip Away, will make the first supplementary payment of $160,000 by Tuesday's deadline, provided their colt, who held on to beat Cigar by a head in the Jockey Club Gold Cup eight days ago at Belmont Park, comes out of a workout today at Keeneland in good shape. The $160,000, a third of the $480,000 supplementary payment, is non-refundable.
SPORTS
December 28, 1998 | ANDREW BEYER, WASHINGTON POST
Balloting for the 1998 Eclipse Award winners has begun, and voters ought to have little trouble making the right choice between Skip Away and Awesome Again for the horse of the year. Skip Away, of course, had a distinguished season, winning seven straight stakes races before fading at the end of the year and losing his last two starts. Awesome Again compiled a six-for-six record and finished the year with a victory in the $5.
SPORTS
November 8, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Trainer Sonny Hine would have liked to believe it wasn't an omen when debris from a United Parcel Service 747 ascending from Louisville International Airport fell in the early-morning hours Wednesday on the roof of Barn 36, disturbing his $9-million horse, Skip Away, from a restful sleep. But Hine couldn't ignore the possibility. Unlike some of his horses, he doesn't wear blinkers.
SPORTS
November 7, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Bob Baffert says that if Silver Charm runs the way he has looked this week, his horse will win the Breeders' Cup Classic. "But if he runs the way I feel, then we're in trouble," Baffert said, alluding to how social and professional considerations, along with general pre-race jitters, can overwhelm a trainer in the days before what has become the world's richest race.
SPORTS
November 6, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE
One day Skip Away's barn is showered with engine debris from an airplane in distress. The next day Skip Away drops his exercise rider and runs off. What next before Saturday's Breeders' Cup Classic at Churchill Downs, a horse-napping by Martians? Skip Away's latest potential catastrophe occurred during a morning gallop Thursday. Trainer Sonny Hine's horse unseated Clemente Sanchez, continued for about 10 yards, then stopped to look around, practically inviting another horseman to apprehend him.
SPORTS
November 5, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after Wednesday's decision had been made, R.D. Hubbard was standing in front of his trainer's barn at Churchill Downs when his cellular phone rang. "We're going in the Classic," the chairman of Hollywood Park said. "Yeah, we've decided to take a shot." After Hubbard put the phone away, he said that he was talking to Johnny Jones, the owner of Walmac International, the Lexington, Ky., farm where Gentlemen will stand at stud next year.
SPORTS
June 29, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Great horses should have names that inspire visions of greatness. They should have names like Man O' War, Assault, Spectacular Bid or Bold Whatever. When you hear of a horse named Secretariat, you imagine the leader of the United Nations or the Politburo. When you hear Cigar, you imagine powerful men with sleeves rolled up and ties loosened while deciding the fate of the nation in a smoke-filled room.
SPORTS
November 6, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Sonny Hine speaks Mandarin, but it turns out he's a student of history as well as language. "I remember [trainer] Elliott Burch brought a horse out to California a number of years ago," Hine said. "He came two weeks early, and then the horse didn't run much for him. Elliott sent him back to New York, and then for the next race at Santa Anita he brought the horse the day before. He won the San Juan Capistrano."
SPORTS
November 6, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Sonny Hine speaks Mandarin, but it turns out he's a student of history as well as language. "I remember [trainer] Elliott Burch brought a horse out to California a number of years ago," Hine said. "He came two weeks early, and then the horse didn't run much for him. Elliott sent him back to New York, and then for the next race at Santa Anita he brought the horse the day before. He won the San Juan Capistrano."
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