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Skip Brittenham

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BUSINESS
September 15, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
To understand what makes Skip Brittenham one of the most powerful entertainment attorneys in the country, picture him fly-fishing. Standing thigh-deep in one of his favorite roaring rivers, he knows just how to gauge where the biggest trout will be and which fly will catch its attention. Most important, he knows precisely when to strike.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Air Force Capt. Harry "Skip" Brittenham was stranded in officers' quarters in Washington, D.C., during a snowstorm in 1964 when he found a copy of "The Fellowship of the Ring," the first installment of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings. " He couldn't put it down. The next day, he trudged through the snow until he found an open bookstore with a copy of the sequel. Today, Brittenham is arguably Hollywood's most powerful deal-maker, an attorney whose A-list clients have included Oprah Winfrey, Tom Hanks, and Bob and Harvey Weinstein.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Air Force Capt. Harry "Skip" Brittenham was stranded in officers' quarters in Washington, D.C., during a snowstorm in 1964 when he found a copy of "The Fellowship of the Ring," the first installment of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings. " He couldn't put it down. The next day, he trudged through the snow until he found an open bookstore with a copy of the sequel. Today, Brittenham is arguably Hollywood's most powerful deal-maker, an attorney whose A-list clients have included Oprah Winfrey, Tom Hanks, and Bob and Harvey Weinstein.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
To understand what makes Skip Brittenham one of the most powerful entertainment attorneys in the country, picture him fly-fishing. Standing thigh-deep in one of his favorite roaring rivers, he knows just how to gauge where the biggest trout will be and which fly will catch its attention. Most important, he knows precisely when to strike.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Interviews don't come easy to Michael Ovitz. Even in his private sanctum, flanked by a pair of colleagues, safe beneath the dual gaze of Buddha and Marilyn Monroe--totemic bits of art on a movie maker's wall--the sandy-haired president of Creative Artists Agency is wary and tense and never stops wishing the limelight would go away. "This is not a comfortable experience for any of us," he says, his hoarse voice so low a reporter's recorder barely registers. "We really function behind the scenes.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The Pacific Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, an organization that serves HIV-infected individuals, held a major fund-raiser Thursday night at the Westside home of actress Heather Thomas and attorney Skip Brittenham. The evening honored Dr. Joel Weisman, chairman of the board of directors for the American Foundation for AIDS Research, and one of the first practitioners to identify the syndrome in the early 1980s. According to AIDS researcher and AMFAR founding co-chairman Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2005 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
To fashion insiders, they are known simply as "the boys." Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez, the adorable young New York designers behind the Proenza Schouler clothing label, made their L.A. debut on April 28 at the annual benefit for the Rape Foundation presented by Barneys New York and Hewlett-Packard.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1992 | ALAN CITRON and ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A third conflict-of-interest suit has been brought against the powerhouse Hollywood law firm of Ziffren, Brittenham & Branca, this time by the former manager of rock star Prince. Steve Fargnoli, who was represented by the Ziffren firm when he managed Prince, alleges that the lawyers later persuaded the performer to withhold management fees to Fargnoli's company.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The hard-fought battle over who would run Warner Bros. ended months ago, but there may be more casualties. Jeff Robinov, head of Warner Bros.' movie unit, is planning to exit the company, according to several people at the studio who asked not to be identified because they were discussing internal personnel matters. Robinov's expected departure comes less than a month after the resignation of Bruce Rosenblum, chief of Warner Bros. Television Group. Both Robinov and Rosenblum lost the fight to succeed Barry Meyer as chairman and chief executive of Hollywood's largest film and television studio.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The Scene: Sunday's closing-night dinner for Art Walk '91, the annual fund-raiser for the Venice Free Clinic. Now in its 12th year, the Art Walk has grown from an informal tour of galleries and studios in the beach community to an event that takes over a good portion of Venice for the whole weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1989 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In a dramatic realignment of his royal court, Prince--one of the most influential and flamboyant pop stars of the '80s--has severed his ties with his longtime management team, lawyer and business manager. The surprise move--one which a music industry mogul termed "a shocker"--is the choice of new manager, "Purple Rain" writer-director Albert Magnoli, who has no prior experience as a rock manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before analyzing the Emmy nominations. The Skinny: Once again I've been snubbed by the Emmy Awards. Where's the love? Thursday's headlines include early analysis of the Emmy nominations, China's plan to release "The Dark Knight" and "The Amazing Spider-Man" opposite each other and the latest on the fight between Viacom and Nickelodeon. Daily Dose: The Emmy nominations were announced Thursday morning (see below). Clearly the most awkward Emmy nomination has to be best actress for Kathy Bates of "Harry's Law. " NBC, of course, canceled "Harry's Law" despite it being one of the network's most popular dramas.
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