Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSkip Hicks
IN THE NEWS

Skip Hicks

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 28, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Route 287 runs nearly straight across the rolling hills from Fort Worth, and its boundaries are barbed-wire fences, the occasional oil well and thousands of Black Angus and Hereford beeves. Some are trying to escape the cold north wind in what protection is afforded by leafless trees, while others are poking through an accumulating white blanket for breakfast. You drive 50-55 mph in the blowing snow and are passed by gun-racked pickup trucks doing 70 on the four-lane highway.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 10, 2001 | STEVE HENSON and DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Catastrophic events such as the death of football players do more than offer guideposts for the future. New light is cast on the past. Remember the UCLA opener, Aug. 30, 1997, when freshman Jermaine Lewis was stopped on fourth down from the one in the waning seconds and Washington State held on, 37-34? Standing on the sideline was Skip Hicks, who had rushed for 190 yards that day. Why, oh why, didn't Coach Bob Toledo put him in to carry the ball, the Bruin faithful cried.
Advertisement
SPORTS
August 28, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now you see Skip Hicks . . . . . . ripping off 40 yards for a touchdown against California in 1993, the second time he touched the ball at UCLA . . . running for 148 yards against Nebraska the next week . . . running for a touchdown against USC in a game that clinched a Bruin Rose Bowl berth, then running for 67 yards in only eight carries in the Rose Bowl game. Now you don't . . . . . . because of a sprained ankle suffered at the end of a 21-yard run against Nebraska . . .
SPORTS
July 31, 1999 | From Washington Post
Skip Hicks, in training camp with the Washington Redskins, apologized Friday for his participation in the scandal involving the use of handicapped parking permits by UCLA football players. Hicks denied allegations that he was a key figure who falsified parking applications and taught others how to do so. "I wasn't the ringleader," said Hicks, who played for the Bruins between 1993 and '97. "As far as having a placard, I was young. You do things you regret when you're young.
SPORTS
July 31, 1999 | From Washington Post
Skip Hicks, in training camp with the Washington Redskins, apologized Friday for his participation in the scandal involving the use of handicapped parking permits by UCLA football players. Hicks denied allegations that he was a key figure who falsified parking applications and taught others how to do so. "I wasn't the ringleader," said Hicks, who played for the Bruins between 1993 and '97. "As far as having a placard, I was young. You do things you regret when you're young.
SPORTS
October 1, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With apologies to Joseph Heller, at UCLA it has become "Catch 42." It's third and three, a passing down in the Bruin offense, but receivers have been dropping passes since August, and never more so than on Saturday at Michigan. So maybe it's really a running down. But Skip Hicks, No. 42, has been slipping up to a hole as though it were at the edge of a cliff. No one is getting bruised tackling him. You make the call. Coach Bob Toledo made his Tuesday, when he delivered a blow to Hicks' ego.
SPORTS
July 21, 1999 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Add running back Skip Hicks to the list of current and former UCLA football players who apparently had placards entitling them to use handicapped parking spaces. A check of records at the California Department of Motor Vehicles on Tuesday revealed Hicks had three placards covering an 18-month period, including the 1997 season when he scored a school-record 26 touchdowns, rushed 258 times for 1,282 yards and was an All-American. Hicks could not be reached for comment.
SPORTS
September 2, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an obsession, time invested in the summer in quantifying the definition of a successful season, moments whiled away in bed on Thursday nights determining the requirements of a superior Saturday. Every play has a point that says mission accomplished. Skip Hicks figures it's about five yards downfield, and anything else is gravy. He likes gravy. Hicks got about 87 yards of it on his first run, a 92-yarder on the game's second play on Saturday at Pullman, Wash.
SPORTS
September 27, 1994 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's 19, and like many a teen-ager he hears what he wants to hear. Nobody is telling him he can't play , only that he shouldn't. Which to Skip Hicks means he should. Hang conventional wisdom. Hang medical textbooks. Six months after surgery to reconstruct his left knee, he's set upon running the football against Washington on Saturday at Seattle. He was released to full duty Monday by Gerald Finerman, UCLA's team physician, who had talked with the family.
SPORTS
January 1, 1998 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are some scores to settle in today's Cotton Bowl. Sure, there's the one between Bob Toledo and Texas A&M Coach R.C. Slocum, who fired Toledo in 1994 because the Aggies couldn't beat Florida State or Notre Dame in the Cotton. Maybe a UCLA win can exorcise that demon. But that's new stuff. Skip Hicks and Branndon Stewart go back a lot further. "I've never beaten him," said Hicks, remembering his first high school game as a sophomore running back for Burkburnett High in Wichita Falls, Texas.
SPORTS
July 21, 1999 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Add running back Skip Hicks to the list of current and former UCLA football players who apparently had placards entitling them to use handicapped parking spaces. A check of records at the California Department of Motor Vehicles on Tuesday revealed Hicks had three placards covering an 18-month period, including the 1997 season when he scored a school-record 26 touchdowns, rushed 258 times for 1,282 yards and was an All-American. Hicks could not be reached for comment.
SPORTS
January 1, 1998 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are some scores to settle in today's Cotton Bowl. Sure, there's the one between Bob Toledo and Texas A&M Coach R.C. Slocum, who fired Toledo in 1994 because the Aggies couldn't beat Florida State or Notre Dame in the Cotton. Maybe a UCLA win can exorcise that demon. But that's new stuff. Skip Hicks and Branndon Stewart go back a lot further. "I've never beaten him," said Hicks, remembering his first high school game as a sophomore running back for Burkburnett High in Wichita Falls, Texas.
SPORTS
December 28, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Route 287 runs nearly straight across the rolling hills from Fort Worth, and its boundaries are barbed-wire fences, the occasional oil well and thousands of Black Angus and Hereford beeves. Some are trying to escape the cold north wind in what protection is afforded by leafless trees, while others are poking through an accumulating white blanket for breakfast. You drive 50-55 mph in the blowing snow and are passed by gun-racked pickup trucks doing 70 on the four-lane highway.
SPORTS
November 10, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a lousy feeling, and he had a lot of time to feel lousy. Skip Hicks is a brooder. Outwardly calm, he masks his feelings behind a demeanor of indifference and spoken confidence. The trials of the past are prologue to success. A tackle for a loss sets up a long gain, maybe even a touchdown. A bad game sets up a good one. There is ample precedent. He has scored 20 times for UCLA this season, as he scored 20 times for the Bruins in 1996. He has had 12 100-yard rushing games in his career.
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | BILL PLASCHKE
Great, so now he decides to give the ball to Skip Hicks. OK, OK, it's too easy to blame UCLA Coach Bob Toledo for the Bruins' second consecutive last-minute failure Saturday. Admittedly, the fact he ordered Hicks to carry the ball on third down with 53 seconds left and no timeouts on the Tennessee 20-yard line . . . needlessly running the clock when the run failed . . . forcing a rushed fourth-down incomplete pass that ended the Bruins hopes . . . that was just one awful moment in time.
SPORTS
September 2, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an obsession, time invested in the summer in quantifying the definition of a successful season, moments whiled away in bed on Thursday nights determining the requirements of a superior Saturday. Every play has a point that says mission accomplished. Skip Hicks figures it's about five yards downfield, and anything else is gravy. He likes gravy. Hicks got about 87 yards of it on his first run, a 92-yarder on the game's second play on Saturday at Pullman, Wash.
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | BILL PLASCHKE
Great, so now he decides to give the ball to Skip Hicks. OK, OK, it's too easy to blame UCLA Coach Bob Toledo for the Bruins' second consecutive last-minute failure Saturday. Admittedly, the fact he ordered Hicks to carry the ball on third down with 53 seconds left and no timeouts on the Tennessee 20-yard line . . . needlessly running the clock when the run failed . . . forcing a rushed fourth-down incomplete pass that ended the Bruins hopes . . . that was just one awful moment in time.
SPORTS
August 10, 2001 | STEVE HENSON and DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Catastrophic events such as the death of football players do more than offer guideposts for the future. New light is cast on the past. Remember the UCLA opener, Aug. 30, 1997, when freshman Jermaine Lewis was stopped on fourth down from the one in the waning seconds and Washington State held on, 37-34? Standing on the sideline was Skip Hicks, who had rushed for 190 yards that day. Why, oh why, didn't Coach Bob Toledo put him in to carry the ball, the Bruin faithful cried.
SPORTS
October 1, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With apologies to Joseph Heller, at UCLA it has become "Catch 42." It's third and three, a passing down in the Bruin offense, but receivers have been dropping passes since August, and never more so than on Saturday at Michigan. So maybe it's really a running down. But Skip Hicks, No. 42, has been slipping up to a hole as though it were at the edge of a cliff. No one is getting bruised tackling him. You make the call. Coach Bob Toledo made his Tuesday, when he delivered a blow to Hicks' ego.
SPORTS
August 28, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now you see Skip Hicks . . . . . . ripping off 40 yards for a touchdown against California in 1993, the second time he touched the ball at UCLA . . . running for 148 yards against Nebraska the next week . . . running for a touchdown against USC in a game that clinched a Bruin Rose Bowl berth, then running for 67 yards in only eight carries in the Rose Bowl game. Now you don't . . . . . . because of a sprained ankle suffered at the end of a 21-yard run against Nebraska . . .
Los Angeles Times Articles
|