Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSkipper Carrillo
IN THE NEWS

Skipper Carrillo

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
Mothers don't love their children more than Laguna Beach residents love Skipper Carrillo, says Norm Borucki, Carrillo's friend for 30 years. He is only half-joking. Carrillo, 52, is as integral to Laguna as the baseball field that bears his name. For three decades, he has been third-base umpire, batboy, scorekeeper and cheering squad for high school and Little League games. He has tidied locker rooms, washed uniforms and prepped the fields. And stored it all in his memory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | DAVE WIELENGA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Call me a boy, not a man," specifies Arthur Talbot Carrillo, who has a teddy bear on his bed, a Little League plaque on the wall and a 5 o'clock shadow spreading across his face. Semantics are important to Carrillo, who 58 years ago was born developmentally disabled. Mentally retarded, he was called then. His brain was deprived of oxygen during a difficult birth that occurred two months prematurely.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | DAVE WIELENGA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Call me a boy, not a man," specifies Arthur Talbot Carrillo, who has a teddy bear on his bed, a Little League plaque on the wall and a 5 o'clock shadow spreading across his face. Semantics are important to Carrillo, who 58 years ago was born developmentally disabled. Mentally retarded, he was called then. His brain was deprived of oxygen during a difficult birth that occurred two months' prematurely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
Mothers don't love their children more than Laguna Beach residents love Skipper Carrillo, says Norm Borucki, Carrillo's friend for 30 years. He is only half-joking. Carrillo, 52, is as integral to Laguna as the baseball field that bears his name. For three decades, he has been third-base umpire, batboy, scorekeeper and cheering squad for high school and Little League games. He has tidied locker rooms, washed uniforms and prepped the fields. And stored it all in his memory.
SPORTS
January 8, 2001 | BEN BOLCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach hadn't just fallen on hard times in the weeks following the resignation of longtime Coach Bret Fleming in October. It had fallen off a cliff. Three prominent players quit the team. Others couldn't sleep for days, distraught over the loss of their successful and popular coach. Things deteriorated further once the season started. The Artists suffered the second-worst defeat in school history when they lost by 58 points to Mission Viejo in their opener.
SPORTS
March 23, 1987 | Mike DiGiovanna
Karen McKinney had to put up with her share of harassment, being the only girl on the Magnolia High School boys' soccer team this season. As if opponents' intimidation efforts weren't enough, McKinney, a 5-foot 5-inch, 120-pound junior fullback, also had to fend off remarks from the sidelines that usually went something like this: Get that girl off the field, she can't play! Sometimes they weren't put that nicely.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|