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NEWS
June 1, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
A veteran sky-diving instructor and a woman student on her second jump plummeted 10,500 feet to their deaths in a farmer's field Wednesday after taking off from Yolo County Airport near Davis. The names of the victims were being withheld several hours after the incident, as Sheriff's Department investigators and the Federal Aviation Administration tried to determine the cause of the accident. "It was a perfect day for diving," said Jane Ferrell, a free-lance writer whose husband, Ray, is co-owner of Skydance Skydiving.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2009 | Martha Groves
A 30-year-old parachutist fell to his death Friday after colliding in midair with another sky diver in Wildomar, said Capt. Fernando Herrera of the Riverside County Fire Department. The other parachutist, 42, suffered minor injuries. Fire personnel were dispatched about 11:35 a.m. to Cereal Street near Lake Elsinore's Skylark Field, Herrera said. The area is a popular sky-diving location. Witnesses said the two parachutists were diving separately but collided in midair, got entangled and "went down," Herrera said.
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NEWS
December 1, 1987 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
With her silver-and-red parachute billowing in the breeze and her ponytail straight out behind her head, Leslie Hastings glided to a gentle landing at the Perris Valley Skydiving Center, a "drop zone" well-known to Southern California sky divers. After impact, she grinned before gathering up her chute. "That was fun!" she exclaimed enthusiastically as a half-dozen jumpers landed around her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
An off-duty Riverside County sheriff's deputy died in a parachuting accident Saturday at a Lake Elsinore sky-diving facility. Sheriff's officials said deputies responded to a report of an accident at Sky Dive of Lake Elsinore Inc. The man's name was withheld pending family notification.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1986
Julia Rogers had spent 10 years trying to overcome her fear of jumping out of an airplane, ever since she chickened out back home over South Carolina. When she moved to Los Angeles, she brought the old fear with her. But recently, Rogers mustered the courage to visit the Perris Valley Skydiving Society in Riverside County. There, she teamed up with veteran sky-diving instructor Don Balch for a "tandem" jump from 9,500 feet.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | MELODY McGRATH
Jumping out of an airplane would appear to be an activity grounded in insanity. After all, it's traditionally been reserved for emergency escapes from flaming single-engines. But sky-diving has become a thrill-seeker's sport. It's the ultimate version of bungee-jumping. It starts out the same--with a flying leap--but sky-diving affords you no no last-minute tether to sling you back. With sky-diving it's all or nothing. And the promised adrenaline rush is the exact reason why Sunny Hills junior Chris Winkler decided to do it. "I'm a thrill-seeker," he said.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
A man making his first sky dive died after he jumped in the wrong position and his parachute failed to open, an instructor said. Jack Reilly, 28, of Bellmore was fatally injured Saturday at Spadero Airport. He and 18 others had just completed a sky-diving class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2009 | Martha Groves
A 30-year-old parachutist fell to his death Friday after colliding in midair with another sky diver in Wildomar, said Capt. Fernando Herrera of the Riverside County Fire Department. The other parachutist, 42, suffered minor injuries. Fire personnel were dispatched about 11:35 a.m. to Cereal Street near Lake Elsinore's Skylark Field, Herrera said. The area is a popular sky-diving location. Witnesses said the two parachutists were diving separately but collided in midair, got entangled and "went down," Herrera said.
SPORTS
May 5, 1989
Seventeen classes of drag boats will compete in the season-opening Spring Classic this weekend at Lake Castaic. Starting with today's test runs, the weekend of racing continues with qualifying at 8 a.m. Saturday and elimination runs at 8 a.m. Sunday. Tickets are available at the Lake Castaic entrance and Ticketron outlets. The boats race at speeds in excess of 200 m.p.h, and drivers compete for purses of more than $30,000. Attractions include displays of vintage hot-rod and custom cars and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle show adjacent to the drag-boat pit areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1986 | PERRY C. RIDDLE
Larry Pearlman of Van Nuys teaches fifth grade at Pacoima Elementary School. Last summer he was one of 120 sky-divers who set the world record for the largest formation jump. He jumps every other weekend to keep sharp. Saturday he jumped out of a plane for the 2,000th time. When I was in elementary school, there was a garden shed next to a sandbox, and I was one of the few kids who would climb up to the top of the shed and jump off into the sandbox.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2006 | Stephen Clark, Times Staff Writer
Ever since she was a 7-year-old farm girl in South Dakota, Vi Cowden has wanted to fly with the birds. The 89-year-old Huntington Beach resident got her pilot's license at 24, flew military planes during World War II and just weeks ago became the oldest person to sky-dive with the U.S. Army. "Just because you're a certain age, it doesn't mean you can't accomplish your dreams," she said. "Sometimes people think at 50 or 60 that their life is over. But there's still a lot to do.
NEWS
May 6, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a town known for its bountiful buffets, the most unusual one is staged at the Luxor Hotel-Casino, where freeloaders fly in for a feeding frenzy. We're talking bats, at a bug buffet, served after sunset not inside the pyramid-shaped hotel, but above it, in its famous "sky beam." The sight of hundreds, maybe thousands, of bats flying frenetically in a column of white light against the black sky is so dramatic that motorists sometimes pull off to the side of Interstate 15 to watch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1999 | PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parachutist belonging to a clandestine clique of nighttime skydivers tried to land on Newport Beach's soft sand just past midnight Thursday--and missed. Keith Druse instead floated into the chilly Pacific. City firefighters and lifeguards found the 25-year-old Corona man clinging to a piling near the tip of the Newport Pier and fished him out of the water. "He was cold and scared," said John Blauer, spokesman for the Newport Beach Fire Department.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Passions are more than hobbies, more than something to do on a Saturday afternoon. They do not need to change the world, although sometimes they do. They need only to be a part of it, a part of us. John Espinosa's passion for sky-diving led him to a better place, where race and wealth don't matter. He's found that all people are pretty much the same the first time they strap parachutes on their backs and contemplate the ground below. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | PAUL ELIAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura's annual California Beach Party has come a long way in its 10 years. Just ask its creator, Ventura's special events coordinator Faye Campbell. "That first year I just threw a bunch of stuff in the back of my pickup and drove down to the beach," she said Friday afternoon as scores of volunteers and workers scurried in and out of her office with supplies, logistic questions and a host of other stress inducers. "Now I have supplies stacked to my office ceiling," she said.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | MELODY McGRATH
Jumping out of an airplane would appear to be an activity grounded in insanity. After all, it's traditionally been reserved for emergency escapes from flaming single-engines. But sky-diving has become a thrill-seeker's sport. It's the ultimate version of bungee-jumping. It starts out the same--with a flying leap--but sky-diving affords you no no last-minute tether to sling you back. With sky-diving it's all or nothing. And the promised adrenaline rush is the exact reason why Sunny Hills junior Chris Winkler decided to do it. "I'm a thrill-seeker," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a hard week at work, Kelly Musante begins to unwind Saturday morning at 12,500 feet, a few miles from the drop zone. "I can hardly wait," she said, tightening the harness of her parachute and adjusting her goggles. As soon as the load master gives her the OK, Musante is out the door of the old DC-3 and hurtling toward the dun-colored ground at 120 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a hard week at work, Kelly Musante begins to unwind Saturday morning at 12,500 feet, a few miles from the drop zone. "I can hardly wait," she said, tightening the harness of her parachute and adjusting her goggles. As soon as the load master gives her the OK, Musante is out the door of the old DC-3 and hurtling toward the dun-colored ground at 120 m.p.h.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | MARY GUTHRIE
The pen pals of a class of first-graders at South Bay Junior Academy decided to drop in for a visit. But Federal Aviation Administration officials wouldn't permit it. The pen pals are the Sky Hawks, Canadian parachutists who perform sky-diving demonstrations throughout Canada and the United States. After corresponding with the children for several months, the sky divers wanted to jump from a plane and land on the school grounds, but could not get a permit to do so.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, Corinne Flocken is a free-lance writer who regularly covers Kid Stuff for the Times Orange County Edition
Boy, do kids have it great these days or what? A generation ago, playing with "army men" meant taking a few cheap molded plastic figures, splitting them into opposing forces and, after some cursory gunplay (with appropriate mouth noises), wiping out the whole lot with an aerial dirt clod attack. "Ka-pow!" "Boom!" End of story.
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