Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSky Latin America
IN THE NEWS

Sky Latin America

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 19, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Hughes Electronics Corp. unit responsible for broadcasting the DirecTV satellite-television service in Latin America filed for bankruptcy protection Tuesday and said its chairman, Kevin McGrath, has quit. A heavy subscriber drain was blamed for the woes at DirecTV Latin America. The unit said it will ask a judge to approve a $300-million loan from Hughes to continue operating under bankruptcy protection. The region's largest satellite-TV service had $600 million in assets and $1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 19, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Hughes Electronics Corp. unit responsible for broadcasting the DirecTV satellite-television service in Latin America filed for bankruptcy protection Tuesday and said its chairman, Kevin McGrath, has quit. A heavy subscriber drain was blamed for the woes at DirecTV Latin America. The unit said it will ask a judge to approve a $300-million loan from Hughes to continue operating under bankruptcy protection. The region's largest satellite-TV service had $600 million in assets and $1.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 18, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is shaping up as Latin America's biggest media competition ever, two groups of entertainment heavyweights--including Rupert Murdoch, Hughes Electronics Corp. and the continent's top TV moguls--are about to do battle. The prize: a direct-to-home satellite TV business that will beam scores of channels into homes from Tijuana to Tierra del Fuego. We're talking Big Money. (The main competitors are sinking in about $500 million each.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Carlos Cisneros has seen the future. And, he says, it looks just like the past. "Wouldn't it be wonderful to be able to go back 10 years with all of the information I have today? Well, that's exactly what's happening in Latin America," he says.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Carlos Cisneros has seen the future. And, he says, it looks just like the past. "Wouldn't it be wonderful to be able to go back 10 years with all of the information I have today? Well, that's exactly what's happening in Latin America," he says.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1996
News Corp. has appointed David Evans executive vice president of the office of the chairman, a newly created position to coordinate the company's worldwide satellite TV operations. Evans, who has been president and chief operating officer of Fox Television for the last two years, will oversee News Corp.'s satellite ventures in Asia, Japan, Britain, Australia, Latin America and the United States.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, plans to name Chase Carey to head its new satellite television company, according to a person close to News Corp. Carey has been co-chief operating officer of the world's fourth-biggest media company since 1996 and has been a key figure in guiding its global strategy. He also serves in the five-person office of the chairman and is a member of News Corp.'s board. News Corp.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2009 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Walt Disney Co., in a move that many in the industry didn't foresee, tapped an executive with extensive international experience to run the Disney Channel, underscoring the role of global markets in the network's future. Carolina Lightcap, credited with building Disney Channel into one of Latin America's top cable networks, Tuesday was named president of Disney Channels Worldwide. She succeeds Rich Ross, who left in October to take over as chairman of Walt Disney Studios. Many speculated that the top Disney Channel job would go to its entertainment chief, Gary Marsh, a well-regarded executive responsible for developing several successful Disney properties, including "Hannah Montana" and "High School Musical."
BUSINESS
July 18, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing a wave of broadcast station acquisitions sweeping the industry, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. agreed to acquire New World Communications Group for more than $2.4 billion in stock, a move that would establish the largest web of television stations owned by a single entity. For News Corp., whose holdings include Fox Broadcasting, combining the 10 New World stations with the dozen owned by Fox would create a group reaching nearly 40% of all homes in the United States.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viacom Inc. Chairman Sumner Redstone could not keep it bottled up: Just as Mel Karmazin, chief executive of CBS Corp., was describing his strategic vision for the merged CBS and Viacom for a national television audience, Redstone blurted out: "I'm in control! Remember--I'm in control!"
BUSINESS
June 18, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is shaping up as Latin America's biggest media competition ever, two groups of entertainment heavyweights--including Rupert Murdoch, Hughes Electronics Corp. and the continent's top TV moguls--are about to do battle. The prize: a direct-to-home satellite TV business that will beam scores of channels into homes from Tijuana to Tierra del Fuego. We're talking Big Money. (The main competitors are sinking in about $500 million each.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his purchase of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Rupert Murdoch not only secures a piece of the city's history, but also guarantees himself a place in its future. "Rupert has an enormous interest in the world around him," said Peter Chernin, president and chief executive of News Corp., the parent company of Fox. "And this is the city in which he lives. . . . He likes the ability to have a voice."
BUSINESS
August 23, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin Americans devoured the World Cup soccer tournament this summer, watching hours a day of previews, matches and post-game analyses. For Mexico's two broadcast networks, the Cup became another battleground in the war for dominance over the vast Spanish-language television market. Azteca, the brash 5-year-old network, claimed a narrow but critical edge in the contest for more than $100 million in Cup-related TV advertising revenues in Mexico.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|