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Sky Marshals

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NEWS
October 24, 1985 | Associated Press
The United States should put armed sky marshals aboard international flights again to cut down the chances of hijackings, one of the former hostages from a TWA hijacking in the Mideast told a group of senators today. Peter Hill of Hoffman Estates, Ill., was one of the Americans aboard TWA Flight 847 when it was hijacked last June and taken to Beirut.
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TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Here are some significant events and policies in the history of U.S. aviation security: 1955 A United Airlines plane explodes after takeoff in Denver, killing all 44 aboard. Investigators blame Jack Graham for placing a bomb in his mother's luggage, apparently in hopes of cashing in on her life insurance. It is among the first major acts of criminal violence against a U.S. airliner. Graham is later convicted of murder and executed. 1960 A National Airlines plane explodes in midair, killing all 34 aboard.
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NEWS
August 9, 1985 | Associated Press
Armed air marshals are returning to the skies in growing numbers as part of a Reagan Administration effort to tighten airline security after the hijacking of TWA Flight 847 in the Middle East, industry executives said Thursday. Federal Aviation Administration security agents who are occasionally assigned to ride commercial airlines "have stepped up their activity" since the June 14 hijacking, John Mazor, a spokesman for the Air Line Pilots Assn., said.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration on Tuesday denied airline pilots permission to carry guns in the cockpit, angering pilots who had sought that authority and setting up a fight with Congress over the issue. In announcing his decision at a Senate hearing on aviation security, transportation security chief John W. Magaw said that armed sky marshals were better suited to defend against would-be hijackers and that pilots "really need to be in control of that aircraft."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2001
As a moderately frequent business traveler, I put my life in the hands of the flight crew every time I board the plane. If the Air Line Pilots Assn. believes the best security model is to arm the flight crews, I'm all for it (Sept. 26). This is going to be going on for years, not months, and I question whether we have the means and determination to add special law enforcement officers to fly on all of the 30,000 or 40,000 daily flights for the next five or 10 years. Marc Danziger Torrance The idea of arming pilots is nuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Gray Davis said Tuesday that he has proposed to the federal government that armed California Highway Patrol officers pinch-hit as sky marshals on airline flights within the state until federal agents can take over the task. "We believe their presence, if made known to the pilot and passengers, could add security to that flight," Davis told a news conference called to discuss precautions being taken to protect California's water supply against potential terrorist acts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2001 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis said Wednesday that progress is being made on his proposal to use Highway Patrol officers as anti-terrorist sky marshals on California airliners, but the president of a police union warned that the proposal raises collective bargaining issues. "There are a million questions that surround taking on a task like that. [They] would have to be answered first," said Mark Muscardini, head of the California Assn. of Highway Patrolmen.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Here are some significant events and policies in the history of U.S. aviation security: 1955 A United Airlines plane explodes after takeoff in Denver, killing all 44 aboard. Investigators blame Jack Graham for placing a bomb in his mother's luggage, apparently in hopes of cashing in on her life insurance. It is among the first major acts of criminal violence against a U.S. airliner. Graham is later convicted of murder and executed. 1960 A National Airlines plane explodes in midair, killing all 34 aboard.
NEWS
June 20, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS and JONATHAN EIG, Times Staff Writers
Pan American World Airways, responding to President Reagan's warning against travel to Athens airport, announced Wednesday that it will halt its daily flight from Los Angeles to Greece for at least a week--or until it can bedetermined that the airport is safe. TWA, which has several daily flights from New York to Athens and whose 727 jetliner was hijacked last Friday shortly after takeoff from the Greek capital, said only that it was giving "strong consideration" to such action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2001
I am an airline pilot. I work for one of the airlines whose plane flew through the World Trade Center. In fact, I've flown that route, that plane, many times. This should never have happened, but many pilots have been expecting something like this for a long time. We can stop this from happening again, but not by the methods introduced so far. Here are some reality-based suggestions: Fortify the wall and door behind the cockpit; give the cockpit door an unbreakable lock; install video cameras in the cabin and a monitor in the cockpit; use sky marshals; train and arm pilots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2001 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis said Wednesday that progress is being made on his proposal to use Highway Patrol officers as anti-terrorist sky marshals on California airliners, but the president of a police union warned that the proposal raises collective bargaining issues. "There are a million questions that surround taking on a task like that. [They] would have to be answered first," said Mark Muscardini, head of the California Assn. of Highway Patrolmen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Gray Davis said Tuesday that he has proposed to the federal government that armed California Highway Patrol officers pinch-hit as sky marshals on airline flights within the state until federal agents can take over the task. "We believe their presence, if made known to the pilot and passengers, could add security to that flight," Davis told a news conference called to discuss precautions being taken to protect California's water supply against potential terrorist acts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2001
As a moderately frequent business traveler, I put my life in the hands of the flight crew every time I board the plane. If the Air Line Pilots Assn. believes the best security model is to arm the flight crews, I'm all for it (Sept. 26). This is going to be going on for years, not months, and I question whether we have the means and determination to add special law enforcement officers to fly on all of the 30,000 or 40,000 daily flights for the next five or 10 years. Marc Danziger Torrance The idea of arming pilots is nuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2001
I am an airline pilot. I work for one of the airlines whose plane flew through the World Trade Center. In fact, I've flown that route, that plane, many times. This should never have happened, but many pilots have been expecting something like this for a long time. We can stop this from happening again, but not by the methods introduced so far. Here are some reality-based suggestions: Fortify the wall and door behind the cockpit; give the cockpit door an unbreakable lock; install video cameras in the cabin and a monitor in the cockpit; use sky marshals; train and arm pilots.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft said a battalion of armed plainclothes federal agents will begin flying on domestic commercial flights to guard against the kind of hijackings that ended in the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks. These agents, many of whom will come from the Justice Department, will augment the Federal Air Marshal program, a covert effort by the Federal Aviation Administration. The original Sky Marshal program began in the 1970s to prevent hijackings to Cuba.
NEWS
October 24, 1985 | Associated Press
The United States should put armed sky marshals aboard international flights again to cut down the chances of hijackings, one of the former hostages from a TWA hijacking in the Mideast told a group of senators today. Peter Hill of Hoffman Estates, Ill., was one of the Americans aboard TWA Flight 847 when it was hijacked last June and taken to Beirut.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft said a battalion of armed plainclothes federal agents will begin flying on domestic commercial flights to guard against the kind of hijackings that ended in the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks. These agents, many of whom will come from the Justice Department, will augment the Federal Air Marshal program, a covert effort by the Federal Aviation Administration. The original Sky Marshal program began in the 1970s to prevent hijackings to Cuba.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration on Tuesday denied airline pilots permission to carry guns in the cockpit, angering pilots who had sought that authority and setting up a fight with Congress over the issue. In announcing his decision at a Senate hearing on aviation security, transportation security chief John W. Magaw said that armed sky marshals were better suited to defend against would-be hijackers and that pilots "really need to be in control of that aircraft."
NEWS
August 9, 1985 | Associated Press
Armed air marshals are returning to the skies in growing numbers as part of a Reagan Administration effort to tighten airline security after the hijacking of TWA Flight 847 in the Middle East, industry executives said Thursday. Federal Aviation Administration security agents who are occasionally assigned to ride commercial airlines "have stepped up their activity" since the June 14 hijacking, John Mazor, a spokesman for the Air Line Pilots Assn., said.
NEWS
June 20, 1985 | MARLENE CIMONS and JONATHAN EIG, Times Staff Writers
Pan American World Airways, responding to President Reagan's warning against travel to Athens airport, announced Wednesday that it will halt its daily flight from Los Angeles to Greece for at least a week--or until it can bedetermined that the airport is safe. TWA, which has several daily flights from New York to Athens and whose 727 jetliner was hijacked last Friday shortly after takeoff from the Greek capital, said only that it was giving "strong consideration" to such action.
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