Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSky Television Television Network
IN THE NEWS

Sky Television Television Network

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 17, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The quasi-governmental agency that regulates the British TV industry announced Friday that it was terminating its contract with British Satellite Broadcasting, the company that merged two weeks ago with Rupert Murdoch's Sky Television. And, in a remarkably frosty tone, the Independent Broadcasting Authority also warned that regulators will soon have the power to prohibit the new British Sky Broadcasting from transmitting in Britain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 17, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The quasi-governmental agency that regulates the British TV industry announced Friday that it was terminating its contract with British Satellite Broadcasting, the company that merged two weeks ago with Rupert Murdoch's Sky Television. And, in a remarkably frosty tone, the Independent Broadcasting Authority also warned that regulators will soon have the power to prohibit the new British Sky Broadcasting from transmitting in Britain.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 6, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newlywed satellite networks Sky Television and British Satellite Broadcasting were planning how to consolidate their programming and business operations Monday as a political outcry against their merger began to swell. "We have people down at BSB looking at programming, contracts--everything," said Sky spokeswoman Fiona Waters. With Rupert Murdoch's Sky losing $4 million a week and BSB losing nearly four times that, the deal comes as a relief for both companies.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN, Times Staff Writer
In 1954, Rupert Murdoch--whose company has just bid $1.4 billion for MGM/UA Communications--headed a family firm in his native Australia that owned two newspapers in Adelaide. Now, 35 years later, his newspaper, magazine and television holdings on four continents are said to be worth $8 billion to $10 billion. Which begs the question: How did he do a thing like that? Did the 58-year-old son of a newspaper executive have a grand plan, some global ambition learned at Oxford where he was educated?
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
If movies are ammunition in the global media wars, Rupert Murdoch's decision to bid for MGM/UA Communications Co. could give him access to a badly needed arms factory. Murdoch's News Corp. already owns 20th Century Fox, one of the seven major Hollywood film studios. But a single studio can't supply enough movies to support his far-flung distribution channels--and buying from outside suppliers has proved difficult in recent months.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
"The Simpsons" is the most popular television show in Great Britain that no one can watch. Although it hasn't reached local airwaves yet, the animated series has been the subject of numerous magazine and newspaper articles in British publications over the last few weeks. Giddy teen mags marvel at the latest American craze while more erudite journals analyze the reasons for the show's success. The phrase "Don't have a cow, man" is always dutifully recorded.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After losing a combined $2.4 billion, Britain's rival satellite television networks announced Friday that they will merge, ending a bitter and expensive battle for market domination. Rupert Murdoch's Sky Television will join with British Satellite Broadcasting, which is owned primarily by a consortium of European media companies. The new joint venture will be controlled 50-50 by Murdoch's News International and BSB's principal shareholders, Granada Television Ltd.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newlywed satellite networks Sky Television and British Satellite Broadcasting were planning how to consolidate their programming and business operations Monday as a political outcry against their merger began to swell. "We have people down at BSB looking at programming, contracts--everything," said Sky spokeswoman Fiona Waters. With Rupert Murdoch's Sky losing $4 million a week and BSB losing nearly four times that, the deal comes as a relief for both companies.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After losing a combined $2.4 billion, Britain's rival satellite television networks announced Friday that they will merge, ending a bitter and expensive battle for market domination. Rupert Murdoch's Sky Television will join with British Satellite Broadcasting, which is owned primarily by a consortium of European media companies. The new joint venture will be controlled 50-50 by Murdoch's News International and BSB's principal shareholders, Granada Television Ltd.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
"The Simpsons" is the most popular television show in Great Britain that no one can watch. Although it hasn't reached local airwaves yet, the animated series has been the subject of numerous magazine and newspaper articles in British publications over the last few weeks. Giddy teen mags marvel at the latest American craze while more erudite journals analyze the reasons for the show's success. The phrase "Don't have a cow, man" is always dutifully recorded.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN, Times Staff Writer
In 1954, Rupert Murdoch--whose company has just bid $1.4 billion for MGM/UA Communications--headed a family firm in his native Australia that owned two newspapers in Adelaide. Now, 35 years later, his newspaper, magazine and television holdings on four continents are said to be worth $8 billion to $10 billion. Which begs the question: How did he do a thing like that? Did the 58-year-old son of a newspaper executive have a grand plan, some global ambition learned at Oxford where he was educated?
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
If movies are ammunition in the global media wars, Rupert Murdoch's decision to bid for MGM/UA Communications Co. could give him access to a badly needed arms factory. Murdoch's News Corp. already owns 20th Century Fox, one of the seven major Hollywood film studios. But a single studio can't supply enough movies to support his far-flung distribution channels--and buying from outside suppliers has proved difficult in recent months.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|