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BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Six months after agreeing to drop the SkyDrive brand, Microsoft has finally announced the new name of its cloud storage service: OneDrive. The Redmond, Wash., tech company unveiled the new name Monday, saying OneDrive conveys the mission of the service, which is to let users access their important files from many devices by storing them all in one location. "We know that increasingly you will have many devices in your life, but you really want only one place for your most important stuff," the company said in a blog post Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Diana Marcum
FRESNO - On bad-air days here in the Central Valley, school officials hoist red flags to warn parents and pupils that being outside is officially deemed “unhealthful for all groups.” This winter, though, the most polluted on record, schools have not only raised red flags. On several days, they have had to send out notices saying the red flags should really be purple - indicating “very unhealthful” air - if only they had them. But such warnings have been be so rare that schools don't even have the flags designating the most extreme conditions.
SCIENCE
January 23, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
The European Southern Observatory has released a new image of the Lagoon Nebula that twinkles with hot new stars and stellar clusters that are busy forming in the plumes of gas and dust within the nebula's midst. This picturesque nebula is 100 light years across and lies 5,000 light years from Earth, in the constellation Sagittarius. ESO has photographed the nebula before, as you can see in the gallery above, but this new image is especially frothy, rich and detailed. If you want to take a closer look, the ESO has posted a  zoomable version that allows you to dive deeper into the nebula.  The image was taken by the VLT Survey Telescope (VST)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
It's not exactly Beyoncé shocking the world by dropping an unannounced album on iTunes. But for fans of indie-aligned pop and rock, Sky Ferreira provided a jolt late Monday with a tweet that linked to a video featuring her and Ariel Pink performing Pink's song "My Molly. " Ferreira's collaboration with the L.A.-based eccentric -- in which they crash around a white-walled soundstage -- follows the release in October of her long-anticipated debut album, "Night Time, My Time. " The video was directed by Grant Singer, who also made recent clips for the record's title track and "You're Not the One. " And "My Molly" might be the first in a series of such surprises.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Saturday is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in terms of daylight hours -- and perhaps a sun lover's nightmare and a stargazer's delight. Jack Fusco falls into the second category, and his time-lapse video above shows how fascinating the heavens can be. The more than 2,000 photos he took during the October Jasper Dark Sky Festival in Alberta, Canada , create an ethereal portrait of an area that ranks low in light pollution. That's distinctly different from New Jersey, where he began to experiment with photography by taking photos of the ocean at sunrise.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Michael Corenblith is grateful for the rolling hills of Simi Valley. The production designer on Disney's "Saving Mr. Banks" relied heavily on the 10,000-acre Big Sky Ranch in the Ventura County city to help re-create the childhood home of P.L. Travers, the "Mary Poppins" novelist at the center of the film. The just-released movie starring Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson tells the story of Walt Disney's relationship with Travers and flashbacks on her tough childhood growing up in the Australian outback.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Disney had considered filming part of the movie in Australia, but ultimately decided to shoot virtually all the movie in Los Angeles (except for one day in London)
SCIENCE
December 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Hey there sky watchers, here's a subtle treat for your Monday evening: Tonight you can enjoy the smallest full moon of 2013. Mini-moon? Sure, you can call it that if you like. The moon does not move in a perfect circle as it orbits our planet, so there are times in the month when it is closer to us and times when it is farther away. When the moon hits the farthest point from Earth in its elliptical orbit, astronomers say the moon is at apogee. When the moon's orbit takes it closest to us, they say it is at perigee.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The Geminid meteor shower peaks on Friday night, and you can watch the show live, right here. The live broadcast, brought to you courtesy of the website Slooh.com,  was slated to start at 2:30 p.m. PST, but there was some weather interference making it difficult for its Canary Island telescope to see anything at all. The site says it will switch to streaming live footage of the shower from a telescope in Chile at 4:30 p.m. PST. The Geminid...
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Wall Street is chirping about Twitter, which seems to be defying gravity. Shares are setting record highs in midday trading Tuesday, soaring above $50, despite mixed reviews from analysts. The cause of investor enthusiasm: Twitter's move into more targeted advertising that has been a boon for Facebook. Analysts say these ads are potentially very lucrative for social networks under pressure from investors to wring more revenue from users. Twitter said last week that it was rolling out retargeting ads for its more than 230 million active users.
SCIENCE
November 28, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Comet ISON is going to make its closest approach to the sun today, but whatever you do, don't look. Even if the powerful radiation from the sun causes the gas and dust in the comet to glow as brightly as the full moon, it would still not be visible in the daytime sky. The sun's light would completely block it out.  "We don't want people waving binoculars and telescopes toward the sun," said Karl Battams, a heliophysicist at the Naval Research...
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