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Skydome Stadium

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SPORTS
November 15, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ontario's socialist government will sell its 51% stake in Toronto's SkyDome to eight private companies that already are partners in the stadium.
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SPORTS
June 23, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two 30-pound tiles fell from the upper deck of SkyDome during a baseball game Thursday, injuring seven fans and sending other spectators scrambling for cover. "It was bizarre," said Debbie Webster, who was watching the Toronto Blue Jays play the Milwaukee Brewers when the wooden tiles tumbled down in the seventh inning. "Everything came crashing down." Two people were removed on stretchers after the panels fell 40-50 feet from the facing of the fifth deck to the crowd below.
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SPORTS
July 4, 1989 | Associated Press
The SkyDome cost the city of Toronto $375 million, but a lot of the Blue Jay hitters wouldn't give two cents for the place. Whereas the Blue Jays have hit 63 homers in their 67 non-SkyDome games this season, they have only five in the first 14 games in their palatial new stadium. And although the ball carried well in their previous home, Exhibition Stadium, Toronto's sluggers are finding that the opposite is true at the SkyDome. "The ball doesn't go anywhere," outfielder George Bell said.
SPORTS
November 15, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ontario's socialist government will sell its 51% stake in Toronto's SkyDome to eight private companies that already are partners in the stadium.
SPORTS
June 2, 1989
Plans for the Toronto Blue Jays to move into the $350-million SkyDome next Monday were thrown into temporary disarray before officials were granted an occupancy permit Thursday night, allowing the facility to open as scheduled. Earlier, city buildings commissioner Michael Nixon refused to issue the occupancy permit, citing numerous alleged building code violations. The Blue Jays are scheduled to play their first game in the new facility Monday, two days after it officially opens with an entertainment gala.
SPORTS
June 23, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two 30-pound tiles fell from the upper deck of SkyDome during a baseball game Thursday, injuring seven fans and sending other spectators scrambling for cover. "It was bizarre," said Debbie Webster, who was watching the Toronto Blue Jays play the Milwaukee Brewers when the wooden tiles tumbled down in the seventh inning. "Everything came crashing down." Two people were removed on stretchers after the panels fell 40-50 feet from the facing of the fifth deck to the crowd below.
SPORTS
August 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A man died Tuesday after falling about seven stories from a winding pedestrian ramp at the SkyDome during the seventh inning of the Toronto Blue Jays' game Monday night with the Boston Red Sox. Kenneth Piery, 39, of Kincardine, Ontario, fell to the stadium's ground floor from its top level, Toronto police said. Piery was taken to a hospital where he later died of head and neck injuries. "The victim decided to jump from ramp to ramp.
TRAVEL
November 15, 1998 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRES
Canada's largest annual festival of its aboriginal, or First Nations, peoples will be held next weekend, Nov. 20 to 22, at the Toronto Skydome stadium. Events at the Canadian Aboriginal Festival include three Grand Entries, in which hundreds of dancers and singers parade; a concert featuring Inuit and other performers; spiritual teachers and healers; arts and crafts; and native foods such as fried bread and buffalo.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | From Associated Press
Exhausted by a triumphant but hectic North American tour, Nelson Mandela became weak and left a Friday luncheon early. On the advice of his doctor, he also canceled a news conference and cut short a state dinner. At the luncheon with business executives, the 80-year-old Mandela needed assistance returning to his seat after speaking, and then he left the room early after repeatedly wiping his brow.
SPORTS
August 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A man died Tuesday after falling about seven stories from a winding pedestrian ramp at the SkyDome during the seventh inning of the Toronto Blue Jays' game Monday night with the Boston Red Sox. Kenneth Piery, 39, of Kincardine, Ontario, fell to the stadium's ground floor from its top level, Toronto police said. Piery was taken to a hospital where he later died of head and neck injuries. "The victim decided to jump from ramp to ramp.
SPORTS
July 4, 1989 | Associated Press
The SkyDome cost the city of Toronto $375 million, but a lot of the Blue Jay hitters wouldn't give two cents for the place. Whereas the Blue Jays have hit 63 homers in their 67 non-SkyDome games this season, they have only five in the first 14 games in their palatial new stadium. And although the ball carried well in their previous home, Exhibition Stadium, Toronto's sluggers are finding that the opposite is true at the SkyDome. "The ball doesn't go anywhere," outfielder George Bell said.
SPORTS
June 2, 1989
Plans for the Toronto Blue Jays to move into the $350-million SkyDome next Monday were thrown into temporary disarray before officials were granted an occupancy permit Thursday night, allowing the facility to open as scheduled. Earlier, city buildings commissioner Michael Nixon refused to issue the occupancy permit, citing numerous alleged building code violations. The Blue Jays are scheduled to play their first game in the new facility Monday, two days after it officially opens with an entertainment gala.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush warned Tuesday that, despite the latest flurry of diplomatic activity, there is no certainty that a START agreement will soon be signed with the Soviet Union. In a day when he mixed business with baseball, the President made his comment in a joint news conference with Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney at the SkyDome stadium just before the annual All-Star Baseball Game. Bush said he was pleased that Soviet President Mikhail S.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1995 | From Reuters
Brewer John Labatt Ltd. accepted an offer valued at $2.9 billion from Interbrew of Belgium on Tuesday, a deal that would create the world's third-largest brewing company, behind Anheuser-Busch Cos. and Heineken. Labatt, Canada's second-largest brewer, turned to privately held Interbrew to rescue it from a hostile $1.68-billion takeover offer from Onex Corp., a Canadian leveraged buyout firm. The news sparked a sharp jump in the stock of Labatt, which closed up $1.
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