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Skyler Thomas

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July 7, 1994 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The slogan on Skyler Thomas' chest says it all: "I Can't Even Think Straight." Since early 1990, when he conceived a line of T-shirts with such in-your-face commentary as "Nobody Knows I'm Gay," "What a Difference a Gay Makes" and "Closets Are for Clothes," the 30-year-old humorist has been out of breath. In four years, the Culver City company he calls Don't Panic has evolved into a thriving $2.
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NEWS
July 7, 1994 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The slogan on Skyler Thomas' chest says it all: "I Can't Even Think Straight." Since early 1990, when he conceived a line of T-shirts with such in-your-face commentary as "Nobody Knows I'm Gay," "What a Difference a Gay Makes" and "Closets Are for Clothes," the 30-year-old humorist has been out of breath. In four years, the Culver City company he calls Don't Panic has evolved into a thriving $2.
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NEWS
August 25, 1994 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The slogan on Skyler Thomas' chest says it all: "I Can't Even Think Straight." Since early 1990, when he conceived a line of T-shirts with such in-your-face commentary as "Nobody Knows I'm Gay," "What a Difference a Gay Makes" and "Closets Are for Clothes," the 30-year-old humorist has been out of breath. In four years, the Culver City company he calls Don't Panic has evolved into a thriving $2.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | GAILE ROBINSON
If you thought it was tough choosing a festive frock to wear to your office party, consider the dilemma for guests invited to Mossimo's holiday bash last week in Santa Ana. The invitations, in the form of backstage passes, encouraged "Swank Attire." The terribly trendy folks translated this to mean "the ghost of proms past." Men wore chinos or baggy jeans with ruffle-front tuxedo shirts unbuttoned to the waist to expose skinny Ts underneath.
OPINION
February 26, 1995 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Center for the New West and an international fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Business in Los Angeles
Few communities have emerged from Southern California's recent recession stronger, or with better prospects, than West Hollywood. Its key commercial districts--the Sunset Strip, Santa Monica Boulevard and the Pacific Design Center--are thriving. For example, the once troubled Design Center and the city's entertainment-related offices have occupancy rates around 85%, far higher than most surrounding cities. Even the number of restaurant openings has increased at a time when closures are the rule.
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