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Skyscraper Museum

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NEWS
August 19, 2002 | FRED BRUNING, NEWSDAY
Maybe it was inevitable, but things are looking up for the Skyscraper Museum. The not-for-profit operation has bounced from place to place to place in the last six years. Then, after Sept. 11, it bounced again, surrendering gallery space to emergency teams assisting small-business owners devastated by the World Trade Center attacks.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - King Kong climbed it. A bomber crashed into it. Now the country's most iconic building is going public. The Empire State Building is set to make its debut Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange. And for $13 - about half the cost of a ticket to its famous observation deck - you can own a piece of the American landmark. When it was completed in 1931, the 102-story Art Deco landmark reigned as the tallest building in the world. An enduring symbol of Gotham's vertical prowess, it retained its status as the tallest skyscraper in New York City for four decades, until it was eclipsed by the old World Trade Center at the foot of Manhattan.
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NATIONAL
April 4, 2004 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
Manhattan has museums of folk art, Chinese culture and maritime history. But the city that is defined by its soaring buildings and the grand ambitions behind them has only now gotten a permanent place devoted to its world-famous skyline. The Skyscraper Museum tells the story of New York's development through its hulking masses of steel and granite.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Any skyscraper is a contradiction. The tall tower is architecture's most famous building type and also the one most clearly at odds with the profession's roots. Fundamentally, architecture is shelter, a concession that we're afraid to face the elements without protection. A skyscraper is vertical hubris. Perhaps no architect embodied the oddness of skyscraper architecture more than Minoru Yamasaki, the Seattle native who designed the 110-story World Trade Center towers. Yamasaki was afraid of heights; he made the windows of the twin towers just 18 inches wide to ease the fears of the people inside the buildings who shared his anxiety.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - King Kong climbed it. A bomber crashed into it. Now the country's most iconic building is going public. The Empire State Building is set to make its debut Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange. And for $13 - about half the cost of a ticket to its famous observation deck - you can own a piece of the American landmark. When it was completed in 1931, the 102-story Art Deco landmark reigned as the tallest building in the world. An enduring symbol of Gotham's vertical prowess, it retained its status as the tallest skyscraper in New York City for four decades, until it was eclipsed by the old World Trade Center at the foot of Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Any skyscraper is a contradiction. The tall tower is architecture's most famous building type and also the one most clearly at odds with the profession's roots. Fundamentally, architecture is shelter, a concession that we're afraid to face the elements without protection. A skyscraper is vertical hubris. Perhaps no architect embodied the oddness of skyscraper architecture more than Minoru Yamasaki, the Seattle native who designed the 110-story World Trade Center towers. Yamasaki was afraid of heights; he made the windows of the twin towers just 18 inches wide to ease the fears of the people inside the buildings who shared his anxiety.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Empire State Building, once the tallest building in the world, is turning 75 years old Monday. Like London's Crystal Palace and the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Empire State Building represented in its time "what we were capable of," says Carol Willis, an architectural historian and founder-director of the Skyscraper Museum in lower Manhattan. Construction of the Empire State Building was one of the most remarkable feats of the 20th century.
TRAVEL
October 24, 2004 | Craig Nakano, Times Staff Writer
Fly back with me to the year 2000. The average hotel rate in New York is $237 plus tax, or about $270. Three nights' lodging, two plane tickets from L.A., museum admissions, modest meals, cabs -- suddenly a long weekend is $1,500. And you haven't even seen "Cats." Here's the good news: Times have changed. The average room rate in New York has declined 18.6% since its peak in 2000, according to NYC & Co., the city's convention and visitors bureau.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | RICK HAMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The towers loom ahead as you drive down Woodward Avenue, rising out of the morning haze like the Rockies from the Plains. It is a thrilling sight; in places like this, Americans created the skyscraper city. But as you drive closer you see windows dark or boarded or broken, and sooty facades and deserted doorways. Suddenly, you are not approaching a skyscraper city. You are whistling past a skyscraper graveyard.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1995 | RICK HAMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The towers loom ahead as you drive down Woodward Avenue, rising out of the morning haze like the Rockies from the Plains. It is a thrilling sight; in places like this, Americans created the skyscraper city. But as you drive closer you see windows dark or boarded or broken, and sooty facades and deserted doorways. Suddenly, you are not approaching a skyscraper city. You are whistling past a skyscraper graveyard.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2004 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
Manhattan has museums of folk art, Chinese culture and maritime history. But the city that is defined by its soaring buildings and the grand ambitions behind them has only now gotten a permanent place devoted to its world-famous skyline. The Skyscraper Museum tells the story of New York's development through its hulking masses of steel and granite.
NEWS
August 19, 2002 | FRED BRUNING, NEWSDAY
Maybe it was inevitable, but things are looking up for the Skyscraper Museum. The not-for-profit operation has bounced from place to place to place in the last six years. Then, after Sept. 11, it bounced again, surrendering gallery space to emergency teams assisting small-business owners devastated by the World Trade Center attacks.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - It was all so simple for King Kong, the giant ape who fled his captors by clambering to the top of the Empire State Building. Back then, there was no question the Manhattan icon was America's tallest skyscraper. But that was before Sept. 11, 2001, when the destruction of the World Trade Center towers sparked a rebuilding effort that included vows to produce a new "tallest skyscraper" for the country: a 1,776-foot-high building designed to pack a symbolic punch and serve as a memorial to those killed in the attacks.
NEWS
January 13, 2002 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a jagged hole in the heart of lower Manhattan, a 16-acre moonscape that continues to trigger fury, grief and numbing disbelief in those flocking to see it. But the emotions flaring now at the World Trade Center site, powerful as they are, may be nothing compared to those ahead. As the first phase of cleanup at ground zero nears completion, New York--and America--must confront a difficult question: What exactly should be done with the sprawling vacant lot?
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