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June 13, 1999
Barry Farrell's compelling account of the Symbionese Liberation Army shootout ("In a Let-Burn Situation," May 9) brought back memories of that incredible day. As executive producer for KNXT News (now KCBS-TV, Channel 2), I was involved in what, almost accidentally, became the seminal event in the birth of "live"minicam news coverage. The minicam came of age on May 17, 1974. But since then, it has permitted competitive TV news producers to blur the line between news and entertainment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
James William Kilgore, the last captured member of the Symbionese Liberation Army, was released on parole Sunday morning from a Northern California prison. Kilgore, 61, was arrested in Cape Town, South Africa, in 2002 after almost three decades on the run. He was one of five SLA members who pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the 1975 death of Myrna Opsahl, a 42-year-old mother of four who was killed by a shotgun blast after she arrived at a suburban Sacramento bank.
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OPINION
February 24, 2002 | TODD GITLIN
We will soon see whether prosecutors have a strong case against four former members of the Symbionese Liberation Army who were arrested last month and charged with a 1975 murder and bank robbery in a Sacramento suburb. Perhaps the evidence has gone stale after nearly 27 years, and the prosecution is simply availing itself of a terrorism-averse political climate. But it's a safe bet that many will mislabel the case and tell us that a generation of activists is going on trial. A few on the left will agree with some on the right that the prosecution of the SLA "soldiers" for the murder of Myrna Opsahl, who was counting church dues in the Crocker National Bank, is really a prosecution of the left as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
More than a generation has passed since the August night in 1975 when Sara Jane Olson and other Symbionese Liberation Army members tried to assassinate Los Angeles police officers by placing pipe bombs under squad cars. But for John Hall, one of the officers targeted in the plot, the memories of that night and what might have been remain vivid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2006
May 17, 1974: A deadly gun battle broke out after hundreds of officers surrounded a suspected hide-out of the Symbionese Liberation Army in South Los Angeles. Six people inside the house were killed when the building erupted in flames, possibly from tear-gas canisters fired through the windows. In February, the SLA had kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst. In the chaotic aftermath of the shootout, some people thought she had been killed.
NEWS
June 9, 1985 | From United Press International
The Israeli-backed South Lebanon Army seized 24 Finnish members of the U.N. peacekeeping force Friday and threatened to kill them one by one unless Shia Muslims released 11 captive SLA militiamen. The SLA later released two Finnish soldiers. One returned to captivity after relaying a message from his captors. In a separate incident, Austria's ambassador, a U.N.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A military court sentenced 23 people to prison terms ranging from three weeks to five years for collaboration or contact with Israel during its occupation of parts of southern Lebanon. The defendants were all members of the now-defunct South Lebanon Army, Israel's proxy militia in the region. About 2,200 former members of the SLA surrendered to Lebanese authorities or were captured after Israel withdrew in May.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
She lives in a fancy suburb, drives a fancy car, serves on fancy charity committees. She has a husband, a strong marriage of nearly a decade and daughters named Gillian and Lydia. She calls herself a conservative Republican. For recreation, she loves to shop wholesale, favoring the fashions of Mary McFadden. No, Patricia Hearst Shaw does not dwell on the events that began 14 years ago, two weeks before her 20th birthday. She apportions little time for pondering her kidnaping by the Symbionese Liberation Army, her life in hiding with the revolutionary brigade that dubbed her Tania, the bank robberies they committed or the ugly, angry words she hurled at her family.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A state prison board today denied parole for Joseph Remiro, a notorious member of the Symbionese Liberation Army who is serving a life sentence for the 1973 murder of Marcus Foster, Oakland schools superintendent. The three-member panel refused to set a parole date on grounds that Remiro "would pose an unreasonable risk if given a projected parole date at this time." The prisoner chose not to attend the hearing and refused to confer with his state-appointed attorney prior to the hearing.
OPINION
December 9, 2001
Re "Sara Jane Saga Ends--We Hope," Dec. 5: Sara Jane Olson is a beautiful, intelligent, generous, compassionate mother, wife, community activist and artist. She is a pillar of humanity. Of course she hid all these years from small-minded, vindictive troglodytes like your (former city attorney) Mayor James Hahn, Deputy Dist. Attys. Eleanor Hunter and Michael Latin and a lynch mob typified by your disgustingly callous writer Steve Lopez, who glibly compares Olson's torment about going to jail for the rest of her life with indecisively ordering a pizza.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | Andrew Blankstein
The Los Angeles police union Monday called on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to oppose a bid by former Symbionese Liberation Army member and fugitive Sara Jane Olson to serve her supervised parole in Minnesota, where she would be near her family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Henry R. "Hank" Allison III, 64, a former KFWB radio reporter whose coverage of the gun battle between the LAPD and the Symbionese Liberation Army earned national recognition, died Sept. 6 of a blood clot at his Nashville home, the website LARadio.com reported. Allison was one of four reporters for KFWB-AM (980) to receive a Columbia-DuPont Award for on-the-scene reporting of the May 17, 1974, shootout in South Los Angeles. Their coverage "made five consecutive hours . . . into a single chilling and coherent whole," the award jury said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
Sara Jane Olson's premature release from state prison last week was the result of a clerical error made three years ago, officials said Monday. The mistake occurred in early 2005, when a worker updated the former Symbionese Liberation Army member's prison file and inadvertently cut two years off her term. Olson was freed March 17, then rearrested Saturday after being detained at Los Angeles International Airport as she prepared to fly home to Minnesota.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2008 | Henry Weinstein and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
California authorities rearrested Sara Jane Olson at noon Saturday, just hours after she was prevented from flying home to Minnesota from Los Angeles, and said she must serve one more year in prison because they miscalculated her release date. The former member of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army had been paroled Monday from a California women's prison after serving about six years for her role in a 1975 plot to kill Los Angeles police officers by blowing up their patrol cars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2008 | Eric Bailey and Evelyn Larrubia, Times Staff Writers
Jon Opsahl said he learned from the TV news Friday morning that Kathleen Soliah, a former member of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, was released on parole from a California women's prison. Opsahl's mother, Myrna, was killed at age 42 during a botched SLA bank robbery in Sacramento in 1975 that included Soliah. "I'm just dumbfounded -- that someone can be involved in an SLA terrorist-type group, commit murder and get out of prison in a half-dozen years," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2008 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Kathleen Soliah, a former member of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army, was released on parole this week from a California women's prison after serving about six years behind bars for her role in a plot to kill Los Angeles police officers by blowing up their patrol cars. The white-haired convict, who has changed her name to Sara Jane Olson, had been sentenced to 12 years in prison. Like most California inmates, Soliah earned credit against her sentence for working while in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Being a producer, Dorothy Lyman is finding out, isn't exactly a glamour job. "Most of the time," she said cheerfully, "I'm on my knees scrubbing floors, sweeping. And now that we're about to open, I've got all these other things to worry about: Are the walls the right color? Is the wrapping off the plumbing equipment in the basement?" The Emmy-winning actress laughed. "All this because I wanted to direct a play." It's a bit more than that.
OPINION
December 13, 2001
In "Olson Didn't Hurt a Living Soul" (letters, Dec. 9), Ben Rosenfeld writes that the murderous L.A. cops incinerated six people. I watched that confrontation on live TV. The police fired a tear-gas canister into the house, which started a fire. The occupants had the opportunity to walk out with their hands in the air. They chose not to. That was their choice--to commit suicide rather than surrender. Bill Simpson Rancho Palos Verdes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Shortly after 8 each weekday morning, Inmate W94197 reports for work on the prison yard. She earns 24 cents an hour emptying trash cans and tidying up. She is grateful for the job. Caught in 1999 after living as a fugitive for 23 years, she was convicted of murder and other crimes stemming from her link with the Symbionese Liberation Army, a violent band of radicals best known for kidnapping newspaper heiress Patty Hearst. Then Sara Jane Olson went to prison, and turned invisible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2006
May 17, 1974: A deadly gun battle broke out after hundreds of officers surrounded a suspected hide-out of the Symbionese Liberation Army in South Los Angeles. Six people inside the house were killed when the building erupted in flames, possibly from tear-gas canisters fired through the windows. In February, the SLA had kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst. In the chaotic aftermath of the shootout, some people thought she had been killed.
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