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BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
When Scott Riggs took his first commercial radio DJ job in 1995, he was handed a list of songs and told never to veer from it. "It was a shock," said Riggs, who soon learned that DJs rarely get to choose the music at broadcast stations, where playlists are dictated by top 40 hits. "I wanted to be the guy who played a new song that blew someone's mind and turned them on to great music. " Today Riggs, 41, gets to do just that. As director of music programming at the San Diego online music service Slacker Inc., Riggs oversees about 70 DJs who select most of the songs played on the company's 150 stations, including genres as varied as trance, hip-hop, gospel and swing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Ted Rall
Anything can be a point of pride. Your local baseball team. The weather. Political corruption. The genesis of Thursday's cartoon is a barroom argument I found myself having at least 20 years ago with a Chicagoan. "The Illinois state Legislature," he stated confidently, "is the most corrupt in the country. " I made cases for my home state of Ohio and my adopted home of New York. Overhearing us, a third man approached, loaded for bear, to make clear that anyone who challenged Harrisburg, home of Pennsylvania's statehouse, as the stinkiest cesspool in all of American politics would have to deal with him and his voluminous knowledge of the Keystone State's seemingly infinite list of dirty deeds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
"The Happy Poet," a no-budget comedy about one man's no-budget sandwich-cart venture, would have to dial up the energy several notches to qualify as deadpan. With a DIY ethos on both sides of the camera, the Austin, Texas-set feature is an ultra-low-key takeoff on the conventional find-your-bliss Hollywood arc. Funny and incisive in moments, it never fully takes off. The title character, Bill, is a nonwriting poet who has left the workaday world to hawk organic fare in the park. He's played by Paul Gordon, the film's writer-director-editor, with a flat affect and a halting monotone that speaks volumes but doesn't grow less irritating.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Slacker Inc., a music streaming service, has introduced a new feature that it hopes will be a more personalized way to discover music through its app for Apple Inc.'s iOS devices. The new feature, included in Slacker's app for iOS 7, lets users choose music stations to go along with their activities, such as working out or eating brunch with friends. Users can choose from categories such as "Working in the Office," "Running" and "Daydream," which each lead to a selection of programmed, themed stations with names like "Classic Jazz" and "Reggae Brunch.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Slacker employees don't pull their weight. But they do a great job attaching it to their bosses. Managers spend nearly 17% of their working hours dealing with poor performers, according to a report from staffing firm Robert Half International. That's basically a full day a week that could have been spent being productive. And sucking up supervisors' time isn't the only downside to subpar workers, according to the report. Of the more than 1,400 chief financial officers interviewed by Robert Half, 95% said laggards can bring down office spirits.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
Mike Upchurch has elevated slacking to an art form. The Emmy Award-winning writer is the creator of "Powerloafing," an online comedy about a world-class slacker, Cubicle Carl, whose adroit avoidance of work makes him a role model for aspiring office slugs. "That's part of the definition of powerloafing," Upchurch said. "You're not just goofing off, you're getting away with it and you're convincing all the right people that you're a top worker."
OPINION
July 28, 2005
Re "U.S. an environmental slacker," Opinion, July 25 Wow. So I'm an environmental slacker! Too bad Sen. Dianne Feinstein is an academic slacker. Does our planet seem to be heating up? Yup. Is it the result of burning fossil fuels? Don't know. Nobody does. Blaming the warming of the planet on fossil fuels ignores the fact that the Earth has been much warmer than it is now, as well as much colder. Global warming is a red herring. It should be called climate change. As to the Kyoto Protocol, only someone as smugly self-righteous as Feinstein would even suggest that it would be a good idea to turn over our economy to some appointed world body to decide just how much fuel we are able to burn, while Third World nations such as China and Brazil can burn as much fuel as they want.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Ann Powers
HAYES CARLL: Rebellion is a time-honored tradition in country music, contradictory as that may seem. The outlaw position has evolved from a regional, anti-corporate stance, to a free-spirited countercultural openness, to a post-Reagan era slacker critique of Nashville's shiny ways. Hayes Carll is a Texan who can rock when he wants and has both depth and a wry sense of humor. And his gruff voice is perfect for telling the powers that be what-for. (Palomino, 2:30-3:05 p.m.)
REAL ESTATE
April 29, 2001
Regarding "Assessing a Builder's Crew" by Lew Sichelman, April 8: I am a general contractor and appreciate the message that people should consider those with whom they'll be dealing during their construction projects. I am a firm believer that my business is as much about people as it is about 2-by-4s. Where I take exception to the article is its tone. I feel the article painted a picture of contractors as a bunch of aloof, briefcase-toting suits hiring slacker college kids ... to supervise crews of even lower-level goof-offs and loose-cannon subcontractors who all together, on occasion (and by some miracle?
HEALTH
February 13, 2012 | By Kathleen Doheny, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Valenzuela, a managing partner at a law firm in Sherman Oaks, has been an attorney for 26 years but sounds like a fresh law school grad when she talks about her work. "There is an excitement about what is around the corner," says Valenzuela, 51, and to find out what lurks there, she regularly logs 70- or 80-hour weeks and never complains about it. "I manage the attorneys, the work product that goes out, my own caseload, business operations," she says. Three days a week, she's in court for workers' compensation cases, her specialty.
NEWS
August 17, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
I openly admit that I am one of those people who is confused by how to manage my 401(k). Friends and family have tried to help. Financial self-help guides have become a perennial gift each Christmas. Last year, for example, I received a copy of “401(k) for Dummies” as a stocking stuffer. Turns I'm not alone. As The Times' reported Friday, a new survey by Charles Schwab finds that of the 1,000-plus people interviewed, “nearly half (46%) don't feel they know what their best investment options are and one-third (34%)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
With the recent launches of Apple Inc.'s iTunes Radio and Google Play Music All Access , there's no shortage of options for people who want personalized digital music on demand. Slacker Inc., which launched its first radio service in 2007, relaunched earlier this year to capture some of the Internet music market. As the name suggests, the company tries to appeal to a more laid-back listener with its pre-programmed stations and computerized radio offering.   Jim Cady, Slacker's chief executive, may not be the biggest name in the streaming music business, but his San Diego company, which has about 90 employees, is growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
"The Happy Poet," a no-budget comedy about one man's no-budget sandwich-cart venture, would have to dial up the energy several notches to qualify as deadpan. With a DIY ethos on both sides of the camera, the Austin, Texas-set feature is an ultra-low-key takeoff on the conventional find-your-bliss Hollywood arc. Funny and incisive in moments, it never fully takes off. The title character, Bill, is a nonwriting poet who has left the workaday world to hawk organic fare in the park. He's played by Paul Gordon, the film's writer-director-editor, with a flat affect and a halting monotone that speaks volumes but doesn't grow less irritating.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Even with Hollywood's magic touch, zombies may never beat out those seductively stylish vampires for a Vanity Fair cover, but something about the unfashionable undead makes them ripe for irony in the right hands - so many possibilities lurk behind those blank stares. The right hands at the moment seem to belong to Jonathan Levine. The writer-director certainly has a good grip on what to do with those cold souls in "Warm Bodies," a surprisingly sentimental mash-up starring Nicholas Hoult, Teresa Palmer and John Malkovich.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Slacker employees don't pull their weight. But they do a great job attaching it to their bosses. Managers spend nearly 17% of their working hours dealing with poor performers, according to a report from staffing firm Robert Half International. That's basically a full day a week that could have been spent being productive. And sucking up supervisors' time isn't the only downside to subpar workers, according to the report. Of the more than 1,400 chief financial officers interviewed by Robert Half, 95% said laggards can bring down office spirits.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By David Horsey
WASHINGTON, D.C. - A wild windstorm swept through here on Saturday, tossing broken tree limbs, downing power lines and forcing thousands of suburbanites to eat dinner by candlelight. On Sunday, with the skies sunny and mostly clear, the oppressive heat that hung on all summer was finally gone and the cooler air of approaching autumn turned the nation's capital into a pleasant place.  Then Monday arrived and with it came an infestation of congressmen and women. The lawmakers are taking a break from campaigning just long enough to make sure the government does not go broke by the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Director Mike Ott, co-writing with his star, Atsuko Okatsuka, and his cinematographer, Carl McLaughlin, has found a way to say a lot with a little in "Littlerock," an ethereal and ephemeral musing on the art and artifice of communication. Which is not nearly as dry as that might sound, though Littlerock itself, a down-market exurb northeast of Los Angeles where the film is set, certainly is. So parched is this bump in the road that any movement sends dust flying in a landscape already saturated in browns.
BOOKS
March 9, 2008 | Veronique de Turenne, Veronique de Turenne blogs at latimes.com/LAnow and at www.laobserved.com/malibu/.
Dahlia FINGER needs help. That's what Danny, her cruel and sort of creepy brother, tells her to bring their phone conversations to a close. And though it's just a passive-aggressive zinger to punish her for calling in the first place, a few pages into Elisa Albert's darkly comic first novel, "The Book of Dahlia," you figure out that Danny's right. At 29, Dahlia is a TV-addicted, aimless idler, just marking time in the cute Venice bungalow her father bought for her. She's a connoisseur of pot and pop culture; she can make a pretty good mix-tape and will sleep with any guy who oohs and ahs over her baby pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Susan King
If you're a slacker and not afraid to show it, then the New Beverly Cinema has the film festival for you. The New Bev's “Slacker Week” festival begins Sunday and Monday with Cheech and Chong's 1978 stoner classic “Up in Smoke,” directed by Lou Adler, and another stoner favorite, 2004's “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle,” with John Cho and Kal Penn. On tap for Tuesday is the 2001 Broken Lizard comedy “Super Troopers,” followed on Wednesday by the 1978 classic “Animal House,” directed by John Landis and starring John Belushi, and Judd Apatow's 2007 blockbuster, “Knocked Up,” with Seth Rogen and Katherine Heigl.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
A lot has changed in the world since 1987 when "Three Men and a Baby" convulsed audiences with the antics of three narcissistic men suddenly forced to raise a child. The number of families headed by single women continues to rise, as do the percentage of these families that live in poverty. Among two-parent households, however, fathers put in more time caring for children than they ever did before - whole lines of baby accouterment are designed specifically for men (and not just those whose parenting partner is also a man.)
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