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Slacker

ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002 | Manohla Dargis
Dude, it's Silo (Joe Absolom) -- yeah, man, how ya doin'? I just got back from Australia -- I mean, Austria -- yeah, which is somewhere, uh, near Germany, which is like in Europe and it was awesome! Yeah, there were these mountains and drops and there was this director guy (Rufus Sewell), who, like, hired me and some other boarders to shoot this commercial for some sort of digital video camera for some Japanese company, which is, you know, cool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lena Dunham gets it. She understands completely why people might be annoyed not only by her film "Tiny Furniture" but also by the narrative of wunderkind success that has followed in its wake. "Tiny Furniture," which opens in Los Angeles on Friday, is the story of a young woman named Aura, played by Dunham, who returns home newly graduated from college and with little direction in her life. A comedy of manners and emotional nuance, the film follows Aura's baby steps of maturity from bratty petulance toward something like self-possession.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Buffett takes a lot of hits from critic types for the substance-free nature of his party-minded music. Yet he has pulled off one impressive feat with that music: convincing the masses that he's the ultimate slacker who simply lazed his way into rock stardom--and managed to dash off a few best-selling books--between snoozes in his hammock.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | Jan Stuart, Newsday
When you are feeling like a loser, taking a trip to loser-land may not be the most consoling recourse. Such, more or less, is the conclusion reached early on by Jim, the eponymous slacker played by Casey Affleck in Steve Buscemi's low-key comedy "Lonesome Jim." Having bottomed out as a dog walker in New York City, Jim returns to his family home in rural Indiana to wallow in the source of what he calls his "chronic despair."
NEWS
May 11, 2006 | Steve Baltin
ETHAN SUPLEE has been keeping busy playing the slacker brother of Jason Lee's slacker lead character on the hit NBC sitcom "My Name Is Earl" -- and portraying an aspiring filmmaker in the new movie "Art School Confidential." After shooting five days a week, Suplee's weekends are devoted primarily to his wife, Brandy, and three children: 8- and 9-year-old stepdaughters, and a 10-month-old baby girl. "Thursday or Friday I get an e-mail from my wife with basically a weekend call sheet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Slackers," not to be confused with Richard Linklater's innovative 1991 "Slacker," is a standard issue undergrad gross-out comedy notable only for the showy role it provides Jason Schwartzman, well-remembered as "Rushmore's" geeky high school student Max Fischer. Schwartzman, a short, stocky Energizer bunny, is the irrepressible Ethan, who's smart yet hopelessly square, relentlessly obnoxious but fearlessly persistent.
SPORTS
September 8, 2001
A few months ago, sportswriters asked us all to cut poor Tim Salmon some slack. We all did, and guess what. It probably cost the Angels a wild-card spot. Could Salmon's $10-million-a-year contract be keeping him in the game? You bet it is. But Bill Stoneman is not going to admit to another front-office blunder. Let's cut the fans some slack, Bill. Jerry Mazenko Garden Grove Winners never quit, and quitters never win. The former describes the Angel team that played with passion and enthusiasm immediately after the All-Star break.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yoshifumi Hosoya's "Sleepy Heads" is long on amiability but short on inspiration. In his feature writing and directing debut, Hosoya, best known as the cinematographer of "Combination Platter," zeros in on three young Japanese men who've landed in New York, become liberated from the rigidity of society back home and wound up showing that Asians, once in the United States, can just as easily become slackers as countless others.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
With the recent launches of Apple Inc.'s iTunes Radio and Google Play Music All Access , there's no shortage of options for people who want personalized digital music on demand. Slacker Inc., which launched its first radio service in 2007, relaunched earlier this year to capture some of the Internet music market. As the name suggests, the company tries to appeal to a more laid-back listener with its pre-programmed stations and computerized radio offering.   Jim Cady, Slacker's chief executive, may not be the biggest name in the streaming music business, but his San Diego company, which has about 90 employees, is growing.
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