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January 16, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1985, there were 50 independent films made in the United States. In 1997, there were 800. This striking tally is the starting point for "Independent's Day," a new documentary by Marina Zenovich about the two film festivals--Sundance and its unofficial offshoot, Slamdance--that are held every January in Park City, Utah.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell, This post has been corrected. See note below for details
The Hollywood Film Festival boasts an enviable name, one that directly invokes the entertainment capital of the world, but since its founding in 1997, it has struggled to carve out a niche for itself among the thousands of film fests worldwide and the dozens in the Southland alone. Now the festival's new owner is trying to build an identity that lives up to the moniker, though not by way of glitz and glamour. This month, film festival veteran Jon Fitzgerald and his company CineCause acquired the HFF from founder Carlos de Abreu, a Mozambique-born Portuguese entrepreneur, as part of an ambitious plan to turn it into a premier showcase of socially conscious movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Not every film fan can pack a parka and head to Park City, Utah, for the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals starting this week. Though you may have to provide your own VIP wristbands, moderate post-movie Q&As in your TV room and take turns being a hanger-on, it has never been easier to at least get a taste of the festival experience from home. A number of movies are being made available through various video-on-demand platforms, and there are Web and cable TV options as well. Although most of the movies may not have the obvious stars or even genre hooks of some of the festivals' hottest titles, home viewers might be enticed to give them a shot because they're being shown under the banner of a major festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
This post has been corrected. See below for details. The Hollywood Film Festival is in a tough spot with its mid-October dates falling between the Toronto International Film Festival and L.A.'s own AFI Fest in November. To distinguish itself, the festival, under new leadership, says it is striving to be "more relevant" as it launches its 17th annual event Oct. 18 to 20 at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood, showing 25 features and a still-to-be-announced selection of shorts. The festival will include a “Celebrating Hollywood” spotlight, featuring films that either were shot in Los Angeles or  reference show business.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Drake Doremus has always been a bit of a prodigy, a filmmaker who combines the energy and enthusiasm of the 27-year-old he is with an old soul sensibility wise enough to value emotional honesty and capture it on film. Those gifts are showcased in Doremus' impeccable "Like Crazy," his third feature in three years to play either Sundance or Slamdance. While his previous films displayed more of a comic sensibility, "Like Crazy," which debuts Saturday in Sundance's dramatic competition, is definitely for those who want to be touched by the poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
This post has been corrected. See below for details. The Hollywood Film Festival is in a tough spot with its mid-October dates falling between the Toronto International Film Festival and L.A.'s own AFI Fest in November. To distinguish itself, the festival, under new leadership, says it is striving to be "more relevant" as it launches its 17th annual event Oct. 18 to 20 at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood, showing 25 features and a still-to-be-announced selection of shorts. The festival will include a “Celebrating Hollywood” spotlight, featuring films that either were shot in Los Angeles or  reference show business.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell, This post has been corrected. See note below for details
The Hollywood Film Festival boasts an enviable name, one that directly invokes the entertainment capital of the world, but since its founding in 1997, it has struggled to carve out a niche for itself among the thousands of film fests worldwide and the dozens in the Southland alone. Now the festival's new owner is trying to build an identity that lives up to the moniker, though not by way of glitz and glamour. This month, film festival veteran Jon Fitzgerald and his company CineCause acquired the HFF from founder Carlos de Abreu, a Mozambique-born Portuguese entrepreneur, as part of an ambitious plan to turn it into a premier showcase of socially conscious movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2008 | John Horn
Continuing to try to be even more independent-minded than the concurrent Sundance Film Festival, organizers of the Slamdance Film Festival announced a lineup of low-budget films Monday for Slamdance's 15th annual gathering. Sundance, now in its 35th year, has spawned any number of "dance"-suffixed knockoffs, but Slamdance has enjoyed the greatest success of any. The festival launched the acclaimed documentary "Mad Hot Ballroom," which Paramount Classics acquired, and DreamWorks bought the creepy "Paranormal Activity" after a successful Slamdance screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1999
The American Cinematheque's "The Best of Slamdance 1999" program, which was scheduled for 7 tonight and was listed in Sunday Calendar, has been canceled. In addition, the lineup for Thursday's program has been changed. Jay Lowi's short film "12 Stops on the Road to Nowhere" and Adam Abraham's "Man of the Century" will screen at 7 p.m. Gert Embrechts' "13" and Heidi Van Lier's "Chi Girl" will screen at 9:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Cinematheque's "The Best of Slamdance 2000" continues tonight at 7:15 at the Lloyd E. Rigler Theater at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., with Veit Helmer's enchanting "Tuvalu." The nearly wordless fairy tale has an intricate sound design and imagery that recall the jaunty, absurdist works of Eastern European animation that suggest the universe is an antique machine in the process of falling apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Drake Doremus has always been a bit of a prodigy, a filmmaker who combines the energy and enthusiasm of the 27-year-old he is with an old soul sensibility wise enough to value emotional honesty and capture it on film. Those gifts are showcased in Doremus' impeccable "Like Crazy," his third feature in three years to play either Sundance or Slamdance. While his previous films displayed more of a comic sensibility, "Like Crazy," which debuts Saturday in Sundance's dramatic competition, is definitely for those who want to be touched by the poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Not every film fan can pack a parka and head to Park City, Utah, for the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals starting this week. Though you may have to provide your own VIP wristbands, moderate post-movie Q&As in your TV room and take turns being a hanger-on, it has never been easier to at least get a taste of the festival experience from home. A number of movies are being made available through various video-on-demand platforms, and there are Web and cable TV options as well. Although most of the movies may not have the obvious stars or even genre hooks of some of the festivals' hottest titles, home viewers might be enticed to give them a shot because they're being shown under the banner of a major festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Every year about this time aspiring filmmakers head to Utah to show their work. Hoping to launch their career or at least make that next important contact, they flock to a festival that emphasizes scrappy self-reliance, low-budget creativity and the homegrown spirit of (really) independent cinema. The Sundance Film Festival, you say? No, the Slamdance Film Festival. Opening its 15th edition today (and running through Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2008 | John Horn
Continuing to try to be even more independent-minded than the concurrent Sundance Film Festival, organizers of the Slamdance Film Festival announced a lineup of low-budget films Monday for Slamdance's 15th annual gathering. Sundance, now in its 35th year, has spawned any number of "dance"-suffixed knockoffs, but Slamdance has enjoyed the greatest success of any. The festival launched the acclaimed documentary "Mad Hot Ballroom," which Paramount Classics acquired, and DreamWorks bought the creepy "Paranormal Activity" after a successful Slamdance screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
PARK CITY, Utah -- As a young teen, Oren Peli was so frightened by "The Exorcist" that for years he couldn't watch any movie involving ghosts -- even "Ghostbusters." The 37-year-old Peli eventually outgrew his phantom phobia, and now the San Diego videogame designer has crafted his own film about things that go bump in the night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2005 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
The Slamdance Film Festival was born of rejection. The four co-founders couldn't get their films into Park City, Utah's Sundance Film Festival, so they started their own festival in 1995 -- at the same time, in the same place and with almost the same name -- but open only to low-budget independent films by first-time directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2005 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
The Slamdance Film Festival was born of rejection. The four co-founders couldn't get their films into Park City, Utah's Sundance Film Festival, so they started their own festival in 1995 -- at the same time, in the same place and with almost the same name -- but open only to low-budget independent films by first-time directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Slamdance" (Friday, selected theaters) has a great look--vibrantly colorful, sharply contemporary--but often it seems to be dead behind the eyes. The vision of Los Angeles in this neo-punk thriller is almost vacantly beautiful. It's constructed on hip anachronisms; director Wayne Wang and his collaborators make the city look gorgeous but sick.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jamie Strohfeldt calls it her "bat cave." Each day since the Slamdance Film Festival opened here last week in a converted silver mine high above this ski resort town, massage therapist Strohfeldt has invited frazzled, anxiety-ridden independent filmmakers to turn off their cell phones, stop worrying for a few minutes if a distributor will buy their movies and experience the healing powers of a professional massage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Cinematheque's "The Best of Slamdance 2000" continues tonight at 7:15 at the Lloyd E. Rigler Theater at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., with Veit Helmer's enchanting "Tuvalu." The nearly wordless fairy tale has an intricate sound design and imagery that recall the jaunty, absurdist works of Eastern European animation that suggest the universe is an antique machine in the process of falling apart.
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