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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | MAYRAV SAAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's no Oxford English, but this ain't Oxford. And although the English contained in this dictionary may baffle more erudite collectors of lexicons, the scholars who assembled Cal Poly Pomona's latest reference book maintain that their tome is "da bomb." Fascinated by the link between language and cultural identity, Cal Poly Pomona professor Judi Sanders instructed students in her undergraduate intercultural communication class to cull all the gems of speech that they heard on campus for 10 weeks and compile the definitive guide to student-speak.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 15, 2013 | Chris Erskine
A guide to baseball's odd and endearing nomenclature, for those who watch the game only in October: Pitchers' duel: Low-scoring game where pitchers are so dominant that it renders the other players (and fans) inconsequential. Considered by many to be the highest form of baseball. Slugfest: Opposite of pitchers' duel, where lots of runs are scored. Snoozefest: See "pitchers' duel. " Seventh-inning stretch: Point at which fans attempt to stand after consuming too much oink.
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MAGAZINE
October 2, 1988
I'm a California young person--not a teen-ager, but hey! Still young enough to know what's cool, and a lot of your "Slanged, Dissed and Dogged" article was not. A lot was extremely uncool. Oh yes, telling young kids all the cool, hip slang should include how to talk like a gang member. Example: blood killer, East Coast Crips (come on, kids, join up when on the East Coast!). Don't worry, if we're lucky, next week's issue will include, all the druggie terms ( shoot up , toasted , Snow White , speed-ball express )
SPORTS
August 22, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Twitter, Facebook, YouTube ... they're all great, aren't they? Anything that just happens to be on your mind, you can just put it out there for all to see. Unless you happen to be, say, a female tennis player at the University of Louisville who wants to profess her love for Track 5 ofGuns N' Roses' "Appetite for Destruction" on Facebook. Or a Cardinals golfer who wants tweet about the goings-on with the Gambia National Olympic Committee but needed to use the acronym to save character space.
WORLD
February 14, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Daniel Navarrete greets friends with what seems an unlikely term of affection ? he calls them "ox. " Navarrete, a 19-year-old snack vendor, isn't being rude. Go anywhere in Mexico City and you can hear someone calling someone else " guey ," which means "ox" or "slow-witted. " The word, also spelled buey , once was an insult, but it has morphed over years of popular use to become Mexico's version of "dude" or "bro. " A guey ( pronounced "way") can be a spiky-haired boy, a stubbly-chinned jitney driver, a college student with a ring in her nose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
A reader called the other day and, boy, did he sound dissed. That's not a typo. For those unfamiliar with modern American slang, he felt disrespected. And all I can say is: No disrespect was intended. It took me awhile to understand the caller's grievance. He called, introduced himself and politely inquired as to my Thursday column about a southeast Valley neighborhood that officially divorced itself from North Hollywood to become West Toluca Lake.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
I know that language constantly evolves to meet the needs of society at a given time ("Like It or Not, 'Like' Is Probably Here to Stay," Aug. 21). When, however, academics struggle to find a way to make slang that cannot even be a legitimate part of speech, acceptable, a line should be drawn. I'm afraid that today's "so" will be tomorrow's "like." I'm so sick of someone being "so" busted, or it's "so" not going to happen! ESTRELDA THOMAS Fontana
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Hoping to prevent another tragic misunderstanding, officials plan to introduce U.S.-bound Japanese travelers to American slang. "Back off," "cut that out," "get lost" and "hands in the air" are among about 30 expressions to be included in a new pamphlet. The project came in response to the October shooting death of teen-age exchange student Yoshihiro Hattori in Baton Rouge, La.
NEWS
December 20, 1993 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Kids! They say the darnedest things. Like barney , the description not of a large purple dinosaur, but of a "very nice looking guy." (Sample sentence: "That guy has such a good body--what a barney!") Of course in another context, barney also translates to a "stupid or inadequate male, a loser." ("That guy is a real barney.") Then again, there's barney the verb, meaning "to mess up." ("I barneyed on my math midterm yesterday.") Or barney , the beginning surfer.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | PATRICK MAROPIS, Scripps-Howard
"A creep is a man you don't like. Women are not creeps, we have other words for them, but we won't learn those in this class . . . "So-and-so is the whatchamacallit, the thingamajig, the doohickey of humanity--it means the people who aren't that important to you." Ed Tack is teaching foreign college students the basics of American slang in a program sponsored by the United Campus Ministry of Pittsburgh. "I get a kick out of teaching this class," he says, using another colloquialism.
SPORTS
August 2, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Rio Ferdinand, a defensive standout for Manchester United of the English Premier League, is denying a charge of improper conduct concerning a tweet he made in the aftermath of a trial that focused on his brother being the target of a racism. Ferdinand appeared to endorse a Twitter post that referred to Chelsea defender Ashley Cole, who like the Ferdinand brothers is black, as a "choc ice," a slang term for a person who is black on the outside and white on the inside. The tweet was in reference to Cole testifying as a defense witness for teammate John Terry, who was cleared of racially abusing Ferdinand's brother Anton , a defender for the EPL's Queens Park Rangers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Last year, when the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals curtailed the Federal Communications Commission's powers to punish networks for "fleeting expletives," many worried that network television would become a battlefield of exploding F-bombs and barely bleeped C-words. Turns out, all the decision, currently under review by the Supreme Court, did was unleash the "bitches. " Sure, there have been a few more "damns" and "hells" and S-words, some F-bleeps and a lot of playful word compounds beginning with "ass.
WORLD
April 3, 2012 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Mexico picks a president in July, and the winner would be smart to study the lessons of a new film depicting public schools in the country as a giant factory of failure. Classrooms that are crumbling. Pupils who don't understand what they read. Parents who aren't involved. Teachers, often inept, who are protected by a powerful union boss and the politicians who fear her. If this were science class, Mexico's education system might be floating in a jar of formaldehyde, a sorry specimen of how not to prepare young people for the 21st century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2012 | Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
"Awesome," according to one dictionary of slang, is "something Americans use to describe everything. " The linguistic overkill horrifies John Tottenham. So the British-born L.A. poet, painter and journalist has launched what he calls the Campaign to Stamp Out Awesome, or CPSOA. "Saying the word in my presence is like waving a crucifix in a vampire's face," Tottenham says. "It's boiled down to one catchall superlative that's completely meaningless. " I met with Tottenham last week at CSPOA headquarters inside Stories, the Echo Park bookstore he is trying to turn into the world's first awesome-free zone.
WORLD
February 14, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Daniel Navarrete greets friends with what seems an unlikely term of affection ? he calls them "ox. " Navarrete, a 19-year-old snack vendor, isn't being rude. Go anywhere in Mexico City and you can hear someone calling someone else " guey ," which means "ox" or "slow-witted. " The word, also spelled buey , once was an insult, but it has morphed over years of popular use to become Mexico's version of "dude" or "bro. " A guey ( pronounced "way") can be a spiky-haired boy, a stubbly-chinned jitney driver, a college student with a ring in her nose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When Austin Sendek was growing up in Northern California, he was never allowed to use the regional slang term "hella." Now the 20-year-old physics major at UC Davis uses "hella" often — and he's trying to get scientists from Boise to Beijing to do the same. Sendek, who was forced to use "hecka" as a child, has petitioned an international scientific body to make "hella" the name for the hitherto nameless, unimaginably huge, seldom-cited quantity of 10 to the 27th power — or 1 followed by 27 zeros.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | SOREN BAKER
If you overhear someone say, "Man, that's a cold shirt," it doesn't mean the shirt wouldn't keep you warm. He's saying it looks good, cool. Slang evolves at a furious pace, with key words dropping in and out of favor quickly, sometimes within seasons. Obviously, it's usually the "cool" people--from teens to musicians to students--who coin such terms. But how do words get incorporated into slang?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
In the beginning, the Earth was a fashion misfit and the Garden of Eden's serpent was one bad dude. Cain wasted Abel and Noah was one cool brother. So goes P. K. McCary's new slang version of the Bible, one in which the Houston author aims to inspire hope in young blacks dispirited by poverty and violence. The Scripture according to the Black Bible Chronicles is lean, sinewy and street-savvy. In slang, it's bad.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2009 | Lori Kozlowski
Do you know any of these phrases: "think of England," "a gun in your pocket," "go nuclear," "rough and tumble," "knock-down, drag-out" or "at the drop of a hat"? Do you know what it means to "go to the mattresses"? It's no skin off my nose if you don't. There's no doubt that great American cliches are, well, cliches. Whether we speak in street slang or have a broad, beautiful vocabulary, we all use little bits of language that come from another time and place. However you like to talk, it can be funny and fun to discover the origins of classic phrases and what popularized them.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | Jeremy Manier, Chicago Tribune
If you're a hospital patient and a doctor refers to you as a "rock," it's probably not a compliment. But try not to take offense if a nurse mutters "SOB" in describing your condition. Those are just two examples of the common slang and shorthand that reveal one of medicine's little secrets: Doctors and nurses gossip just like anyone else, and they're not above gossiping about the patients they serve. Some of the jargon is harmless or even useful; for instance, "SOB" usually is an acronym for shortness of breath.
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