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NEWS
September 12, 2013 | Craig Nakano
The horizontal-slat fence has become such a familiar - some might say overly familiar - note in modern house renovations that Los Angeles designers Makoto Mizutani and Benjamin Luddy have suggested a tweak to the composition. Mizutani and Luddy, who work under the studio name Scout Regalia, recently released a DIY cheat sheet for a simple wood fence with boards running on a staggered diagonal. The “cutsheet,” as the designers call it, is available as a free download , with a list of materials, step-by-step instructions and helpful diagrams.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | Lisa Boone
When an exhibition of minimalist, hand-stitched quilts from Gee's Bend, Ala., went on display at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2002, the collection of 60 quilts by former slaves and their descendants served as a catalyst for a new generation of modern quilters. “These quilts opened up new possibilities of what quilts could be,” writes Rachel May in her new book, “Quilting With a Modern Slant: People, Patterns, and Techniques Inspiring the Modern Quilt Community” (Storey, $19.95, 224 pp.)
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SPORTS
March 24, 1990
I think it says something about the big-money media in this town when a reporter can for years retain the same assignment while possessing a decided slant on his subject. That slant was one that was seldom, if ever, detectable in Mark Heisler's work. Further, his depiction of Al Davis as a venal, disloyal, tyrannical, avaricious scoundrel is 100% accurate. I, for one, never doubted that Davis would eventually do unto Los Angeles the same as he once did unto Oakland, nor do I believe that his civic plundering is necessarily over.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Katie Couric may want to brush up on her reporting skills before she takes on her new role as "global anchor" at Yahoo! , according to a number of critics displeased with a report about the HPV vaccine on her syndicated talk show, "Katie. " In a segment that aired Wednesday, Couric and a panel of guests discussed the supposed controversy surrounding the vaccine, known as Gardasil, which prevents transmission of a sexually transmitted disease that affects an estimated 79 million Americans and has been linked to numerous forms of cancer, particularly cervical.
BOOKS
October 26, 1997
East of the sun's slant, in the vineyard that never failed, A wind crossed my face, moving the dust And a portion of my voice a step closer to a new year. The sky went black in the 9th hour of rolling trays, And in the distance ropes of rain dropped to pull me From the thick harvest that was not mine. From "The Pittsburgh Book Of Contemporary American Poetry," edited by Ed Ochester and Peter Oresick (University Of Pittsburgh Press: 398 pp., $15.95) Copyright 1997 Reprinted by permission.
OPINION
October 19, 2009
Re "Played by the NFL," Editorial, Oct. 14 Conservative radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh has been dropped from a group seeking to buy a National Football League team. I am sure that his removal has to do with him being such a controversial individual. In a perfect world, I would feel extremely sorry for Limbaugh because I would feel he was not treated fairly. In America, if individuals have the proper skills and qualifications, I believe they should be allowed to make an honest living doing whatever their hearts desire.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | JACK SMITH
While waxing philosophical recently about the mysteries of the paradox, I noted that my favorite riddle was the old one--"Which came first, the chicken or the egg?" I said: "I think it's not only gnomic, but it may be the key to all the mysteries of the cosmos." I have an idea that modern biologists or zoologists have addressed this question and perhaps contrived an answer, or at least a theory. In my superficial reading, however, I have not encountered it. But amateur answers are abundant.
SPORTS
December 9, 2000 | BEN BOLCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Receiver Jon Talmage figures heavily in Orange Lutheran's game plan no matter what the defense--or his own quarterback, for that matter--throws at him. Last week, in a victory over Los Angeles Cathedral, Lancer quarterback Robby Hobbs tried to hit Talmage on a post corner route. The ball was severely underthrown, but Talmage stayed with the play and made a one-handed catch deep in Phantom territory after the ball was tipped by a defender. "He saves us from a lot of interceptions," Hobbs said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1985
Just how slanted can some reporting be? In "AIDS and 'An Early Frost': The Whisper Becomes a Shout," Nov. 13), which was partly about a recent "Cagney & Lacey" pro-abortion show, Morgan Gendel writes, "In Boston, which has a large Catholic population, 150 calls were placed to the CBS affiliate . . . 4 to 1 against the episode. . . ." I am fed up with the news media and others trying to make abortion a Catholic issue. The reference to Boston's Catholic population is a deliberate attempt to play on people's anti-Catholic views and discount the fact that many of us--Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, atheist, white, black, brown, yellow, old, young, middle-aged, rich, poor, male, female--are adamantly against the taking of innocent life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
When the LA Weekly wrote a lengthy story last September about how little Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa attended to his official duties, it wasn't plowing fresh soil. The mayor's exuberant fundraising and his frenetic campaigning on behalf of presidential contender Hillary Rodham Clinton had already received plenty of attention, in this paper and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
There are anniversaries other than that of the Kennedy assassination this month: Nov. 19 marks the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, the remarkable little speech Abraham Lincoln made in 1863 to dedicate the cemetery built to accommodate the thousands killed that June in the famous Civil War battle, and whose words are as much a pillar of American political consciousness as anything the founding fathers dreamed up, four score and seven years...
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | Craig Nakano
The horizontal-slat fence has become such a familiar - some might say overly familiar - note in modern house renovations that Los Angeles designers Makoto Mizutani and Benjamin Luddy have suggested a tweak to the composition. Mizutani and Luddy, who work under the studio name Scout Regalia, recently released a DIY cheat sheet for a simple wood fence with boards running on a staggered diagonal. The “cutsheet,” as the designers call it, is available as a free download , with a list of materials, step-by-step instructions and helpful diagrams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The U.S. Air Force will consider leasing land on Vandenberg Air Force Base for private companies to extract offshore oil and gas from land-based drills on the central California coast. The proposal, opposed by environmental groups, would require the first new offshore lease in state waters since the 1960s, said Mark Meier, chief counsel for the State Lands Commission. It would allow companies to use onshore equipment with extended-reach "slant drilling" technology to reach offshore deposits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Before students hunker down to take their SATs this spring, many will have an array of tools to help them with the exam. Flash cards, study guides and - cursive handwriting? For many, cursive handwriting is a thing of the past, an archaic method taught in the days before keyboards and touch screens. But some argue that writing longhand could help in placement exams. National core standards don't require cursive to be taught to students, but some states, including California, Alabama and Georgia, have included cursive handwriting in their state requirements in early elementary grades, something supporters say should be more widespread.
FOOD
January 26, 2013 | S. Irene Virbila
Subtle fresh spring rolls, a rollicking green papaya salad, comforting pig's knuckle soup, fragrant lemon grass pork, "shaking" beef and caramelized shrimp -- they're all delicious, but hardly the easiest dishes to pair with wines. Unless, of course, you're at Slanted Door, Charles Phan's terrific restaurant in San Francisco. Slanted Door has always been different -- modern, hip, uncompromising. It was one of the first Asian restaurants to buy the same quality ingredients that Chez Panisse or Zuni Cafe might use. And it was also one of the first, if not the first, to have a serious wine list.
OPINION
July 17, 2011
We don't need any of that Texas-style, right-wing political slant in California textbooks, so it's good to see a bill, SB 302, progressing through the Legislature that would require textbooks to be scrutinized for any of the odious changes that the Texas Board of Education ordered inserted into schoolbooks there. But it's too bad that while state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) was guarding textbooks against that conservative spin, he neglected to guard against the liberal political spin that was recently signed into law. The Texas changes, adopted in 2010, represented an offensive twisting of historical fact.
MAGAZINE
September 25, 2005
Preston Lerner wants us to know that movies "based on a true story" may not be fact-checked documentaries (" 'Based on a True Story,' " Sept. 11)? News flash: Not even documentaries are free of slant. While reading this piece it came to me that Lerner may have found the reason for the public's fascination with live, high-speed pursuits on TV news programs. At least those are free of manipulation. Mike Kilgore Los Angeles
OPINION
March 6, 2002
"Left and Right: Enron, Monica and Blue-Light Specials" (Opinion, March 3) demeans Ann Coulter, a conservative political journalist with a sexist reference to her as a "blond Republican babe." With that description, who can take her seriously? None of the many male political journalists quoted has been given any such description, sexist or otherwise, nor has any mention been made of their political affiliations except for, of course, conservative David Horowitz, who is described as a "leftie turned rightie."
OPINION
December 29, 2010 | By Allison Kilkenny
On Dec. 9, the website Media Matters published a leaked e-mail written by Fox News' Washington managing editor, Bill Sammon. In the e-mail, Sammon instructed reporters to avoid the phrase "public option" when referencing President Obama's healthcare plan. He wanted employees to instead call it the "government option," a phrase that Republican pollster Frank Luntz instructed Fox News personality Sean Hannity to use simply because "public option" was polling too well. I wrote that the e-mail "once again illustrates just how laughable the Fox News slogan 'Fair and Balanced' really is. " Here was a high-ranking Fox News official explicitly instructing employees to avoid using the term "public option.
WORLD
July 29, 2010 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
From the time it goes on the air until it signs off, Globovision lets Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez have it with both barrels. The Caracas-based opposition news and opinion channel's newsreaders and reporters — who make no pretense of impartiality and remain undeterred by harassment and threats of a takeover — regularly blast the president with obviously slanted coverage while giving opposition politicians free and usually unchallenged...
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