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BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp.'s Internet-based Slate magazine will become a free World Wide Web site again, one year after the world's largest software company said it would start charging $19.95 a year for access. The bulk of the magazine will be free to anyone with a Web browser, with refunds offered to subscribers wanting to cancel, according to an e-mail sent to Slate subscribers. The magazine will continue to charge $19.95 a year for some of Slate's services, such as the magazine's archives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 15, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
"Think for a moment about the term 'Redskins,'" NBC Sports commentator Bob Costas exhorted viewers during his halftime tirade of Sunday's Cowboys-Redskins game. "Ask yourself what the equivalent would be, if directed [at] African Americans. Hispanics. Asians. Or members of any other ethnic group. When considered that way, 'Redskins' can't possibly honor a heritage or a noble character trait, nor can it possibly be considered a neutral term. "It is an insult, a slur, no matter how benign the present-day intent," Costas continued.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2009 | Associated Press
Slate magazine political correspondent John Dickerson wrote a book about his late mother, Nancy Dickerson, who was the first female correspondent for CBS News. Now he's following her lead. CBS on Monday announced Dickerson's hiring as a political analyst and contributor. Dickerson, 40, will join the analyst team of Bob Schieffer and Jeff Greenfield. He covered politics for Time magazine for 12 years before joining Slate, where he will continue to work along with doing the CBS job.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
If Mitt Romney wins the Nov. 6 election, would he become our most religious president? It's an odd question, but one that has come up in recent days after writer Nicholas Lemann said as much in a profile of Romney that ran in the New Yorker magazine. “If elected,” Lemann wrote, “Romney, scion of an old, distinguished Mormon family (his ancestors had a direct connection to Joseph Smith and Brigham Young), would arguably be the most actively religious president in American history.” There are a couple of key qualifiers there -- the use of the words “arguably” and “actively.” Still, the claim begs a question -- in fact, more than one. What president would Romney displace from the title of most religious?
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
If Mitt Romney wins the Nov. 6 election, would he become our most religious president? It's an odd question, but one that has come up in recent days after writer Nicholas Lemann said as much in a profile of Romney that ran in the New Yorker magazine. “If elected,” Lemann wrote, “Romney, scion of an old, distinguished Mormon family (his ancestors had a direct connection to Joseph Smith and Brigham Young), would arguably be the most actively religious president in American history.” There are a couple of key qualifiers there -- the use of the words “arguably” and “actively.” Still, the claim begs a question -- in fact, more than one. What president would Romney displace from the title of most religious?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1998 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor and editor of Online Journalism Review at USC
Why can't I hate Bill Gates the way all my friends do? It seems so satisfying. For everyone I know, Gates and Microsoft are now the evil empire threatening their personal freedom and that of the world. And they tell me all this in splendid indifference to the fact that the angry e-mail letters they send me are composed and shipped on Windows 95. Never have I found myself so alone in defense of a dubious cause as after I took Microsoft's side in a radio discussion on NPR.
OPINION
October 15, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
"Think for a moment about the term 'Redskins,'" NBC Sports commentator Bob Costas exhorted viewers during his halftime tirade of Sunday's Cowboys-Redskins game. "Ask yourself what the equivalent would be, if directed [at] African Americans. Hispanics. Asians. Or members of any other ethnic group. When considered that way, 'Redskins' can't possibly honor a heritage or a noble character trait, nor can it possibly be considered a neutral term. "It is an insult, a slur, no matter how benign the present-day intent," Costas continued.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp. plans to make a television pilot program based on its online magazine Slate, hosted by ex-CNN pundit Michael Kinsley, as the software giant moves further into TV. The pilot would be produced with Seattle public-TV station KCTS and made available on the Internet, using Microsoft's WebTV technology that lets users toggle between a TV and a personal computer. The half-hour weekly program would feature Slate contributors and guests discussing news, politics and culture.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
Michael Kinsley said Monday he is stepping down as the editor of Slate, the pioneering and widely admired online magazine he founded with the backing of Microsoft Corp. in 1996. In a memo to his staff, Kinsley said he felt "a need for change, and I think Slate could use a change as well." Kinsley told Associated Press that he would continue to write for Slate and hoped to work on other projects, such as promotional opportunities with other media organizations.
OPINION
March 19, 2006 | BRENDAN BUHLER
Put up your dukes, writers of "agonistes." If you think it's clever to apply this epithet to a politician, it's you who has earned this Greek nickname meaning "the struggler" or "the combatant." A word that sports a tweed jacket and pokes you in the chest with its pipe, agonistes famously appears in the titles of poems by Milton and Eliot as well as a political biography of President Nixon. It's used in newspapers and magazines about 40 times a year, often in premortem political obituaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2009 | Associated Press
Slate magazine political correspondent John Dickerson wrote a book about his late mother, Nancy Dickerson, who was the first female correspondent for CBS News. Now he's following her lead. CBS on Monday announced Dickerson's hiring as a political analyst and contributor. Dickerson, 40, will join the analyst team of Bob Schieffer and Jeff Greenfield. He covered politics for Time magazine for 12 years before joining Slate, where he will continue to work along with doing the CBS job.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
Michael Kinsley said Monday he is stepping down as the editor of Slate, the pioneering and widely admired online magazine he founded with the backing of Microsoft Corp. in 1996. In a memo to his staff, Kinsley said he felt "a need for change, and I think Slate could use a change as well." Kinsley told Associated Press that he would continue to write for Slate and hoped to work on other projects, such as promotional opportunities with other media organizations.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp. plans to make a television pilot program based on its online magazine Slate, hosted by ex-CNN pundit Michael Kinsley, as the software giant moves further into TV. The pilot would be produced with Seattle public-TV station KCTS and made available on the Internet, using Microsoft's WebTV technology that lets users toggle between a TV and a personal computer. The half-hour weekly program would feature Slate contributors and guests discussing news, politics and culture.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp.'s Internet-based Slate magazine will become a free World Wide Web site again, one year after the world's largest software company said it would start charging $19.95 a year for access. The bulk of the magazine will be free to anyone with a Web browser, with refunds offered to subscribers wanting to cancel, according to an e-mail sent to Slate subscribers. The magazine will continue to charge $19.95 a year for some of Slate's services, such as the magazine's archives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1998 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor and editor of Online Journalism Review at USC
Why can't I hate Bill Gates the way all my friends do? It seems so satisfying. For everyone I know, Gates and Microsoft are now the evil empire threatening their personal freedom and that of the world. And they tell me all this in splendid indifference to the fact that the angry e-mail letters they send me are composed and shipped on Windows 95. Never have I found myself so alone in defense of a dubious cause as after I took Microsoft's side in a radio discussion on NPR.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
For many viewers, the star of the night was the salmon. President Obama broke up a sometimes plodding State of the Union address Tuesday night with a snappy one-liner about excessive bureaucracy. "The Interior Department is in charge of salmon while they're in fresh water, but the Commerce Department handles them when they're in saltwater," he quipped. "And I hear it gets even more complicated once they're smoked. " Ba-dum- BUM . The one-liner got a rousing laugh from the audience and gave online armchair commentators at home fodder for the remainder of the night.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Microsoft Corp. said America Online Inc.'s online service will be available through its Internet browser, while AOL will distribute its Slate political magazine and possibly other Microsoft services. The rivals already are partners when it comes to Microsoft's Internet Explorer, which AOL offers as its standard browser. AOL is also distributed through Microsoft's Windows 95 software. The new agreement will let Dulles, Va.-based AOL directly reach users of Microsoft's "Active Desktop" software.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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