Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSlate Mailers
IN THE NEWS

Slate Mailers

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
March 31, 2002
Politicians have embraced slate mailers for decades because the mass mailings are effective. The ubiquitous mailers that spotlight four or more candidates or issues usually appear in voters' mailboxes with little fanfare. But what happened in one Orange County race this month should prompt state election officials to keep an eye out for potential abuses that eventually might require new restrictions on what in effect are campaign contributions. Mailers made news when Supervisor Cynthia P.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 5, 2008
Voters aren't showing much excitement over the June 3 election, apart from a race to replace Supervisor Yvonne B. Burke in Los Angeles County's 2nd District. Turnout is expected to be light. Many who do vote will do so by mail, beginning today. It is a stealth election, providing an opportunity to a dangerous candidate with a small but dedicated following of people who make it a point to vote when others don't bother. That's especially true in the races for Los Angeles Superior Court judge.
Advertisement
OPINION
October 16, 2002
"Spotlight Is Cast on Paid Endorsements" (Oct. 11) hits the nail right on the head. As any candidate for office or elected official knows, money is the "mother's milk" of a successful campaign, and slate mailers can spell the difference between victory and defeat. When I first ran for office (L.A. County assessor) in 1990, I was inexperienced in the political arena. In large part, slate mailers and political tabloids on which I paid to be included contributed to my victory. Certainly, having the name Kenneth Hahn helped as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2006 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
As each election nears, they fill California mailboxes: brightly colored cards with authoritative names recommending dozens of candidates for public office. The California Law Enforcement Voter Guide. Democratic Voters Choice. The Official Non-Partisan Voter Guide of California. These are some of the names behind one of the most idiosyncratic tools in California politics: slate mailers put out by independent consultants and publishers as profit-making enterprises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
In an attempt to control spending in future political races, Orange County will begin regulating slate mailers that are devoted primarily to supporting or opposing a single candidate. An amendment to the county's campaign reform ordinance that was approved Tuesday extends its $1,000 contribution limit to cover slate mailers that are produced or distributed with the cooperation of a candidate's campaign. The candidate now will have to pay his or her share of the mailer's costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors are considering whether to regulate political slate mailers devoted mostly to targeting--or touting--a single county candidate. The amendment to the county's campaign reform ordinance would extend the $1,000 contribution limit to cover mailers produced or distributed with the cooperation of a candidate or the candidate's campaign manager or agent.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Howard Cohen thought he was doing the right thing when he refused to pay $5,000 to appear in the "Pro-Choice Voter Guide." The first-time candidate for state Assembly was short on cash and had been warned the mailer was a profit-making venture, not a public service guide by an abortion rights group. That was two months ago. Today, Cohen is paying for his decision.
OPINION
July 21, 2002 | JAMES V. LACY, James V. Lacy served as counsel to slate mail publishers in the successful challenge to Proposition 208. He is a Dana Point resident and chairman of the city Planning Commission.
The Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday made an ill-advised bid to regulate the content of election slate mailers, an increasingly popular campaign tool. The effort was hardly inspired by the high ideals of a Thomas Jefferson. Instead, it looks more like a page out of the Tammany Hall playbook, as well as a form of retribution for Chris Norby's defeat of Supervisor Cynthia P. Coad last March.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | DEAN MURPHY and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Shortly before last June's Democratic primary, state attorney general candidate Arlo Smith's name appeared on a mailer distributed by an organization called the Democratic Vote by Mail Project. This week, Smith's name appears on a mailer of the Republican Vote by Mail Project. Despite the impressive titles of the two organizations, neither is affiliated with the two mainstream political parties.
OPINION
August 11, 2002
As dubious as the information in campaign mailers might be, somebody out there must be reading them. An awful lot of money and argument goes into them each election season. The latest argument has been about slate mailers, which once were just a list of recommended candidates and stands on ballot measures. They most likely would purport to advise you how the environmentalists or an anti-tax group wanted you to vote. Slate mailers, though, are evolving in a troubling way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2004 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ordered a political consultant on Thursday to try to stop the Postal Service from sending out 1.6 million illegal campaign mailers opposing Proposition 56, a measure that would make it easier for state lawmakers to pass budgets and raise taxes. Judge David P. Yaffee ruled that the mailers violated the Political Reform Act because they failed to disclose that the "No on 56" campaign had paid to put its message on them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2003 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
The mayor faces trial on corruption charges. Several other elected officials have pleaded guilty to similar crimes in the last year. And federal authorities are still poking through city records for evidence of more wrongdoing. Even so, the Los Angeles County district attorney's Public Integrity Division, which enforces state laws on municipal corruption and election fraud, turned down a request to investigate an allegedly illegal campaign mailer in Carson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
A slate mailer urging the reelection of Irvine Mayor Larry Agran, two of his City Council allies, and passage of a ballot measure allocating $110 million in state funds for the Great Park at El Toro, received $90,000 from a group that raised the money from companies with development interests in Irvine. The city limits campaign contributions to candidates at $340 per donor. However, there are no limits on slate mailers that list four or more candidates or ballot measures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2002 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Companies with development interests in Irvine have poured $300,000 into two groups backing a statewide measure that would redirect $1 billion a year in state vehicle-tax revenue to special projects -- including $110 million for the Great Park at El Toro. According to campaign finance reports updated Thursday, a dozen local companies have donated since April to two groups pushing for passage of Proposition 51, which is backed by Irvine Mayor Larry Agran.
OPINION
October 16, 2002
"Spotlight Is Cast on Paid Endorsements" (Oct. 11) hits the nail right on the head. As any candidate for office or elected official knows, money is the "mother's milk" of a successful campaign, and slate mailers can spell the difference between victory and defeat. When I first ran for office (L.A. County assessor) in 1990, I was inexperienced in the political arena. In large part, slate mailers and political tabloids on which I paid to be included contributed to my victory. Certainly, having the name Kenneth Hahn helped as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2002 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slate mailers, an increasingly popular form of political communication in California, are giving candidates new opportunities to reach the electorate--but are also undermining campaign finance rules and, according to critics, handing out endorsements to the highest bidder. The multimillion-dollar business produces pamphlets sent to millions of voters.
OPINION
July 21, 2002 | SHIRLEY GRINDLE, Shirley Grindle is a longtime community activist
Who among us is not fed up with the overkill of campaign literature that lands in our mailboxes during the last weeks before an election? Is it not enough that candidates mail upward of a dozen or so self-aggrandizing brochures? Now, a new source of campaign fodder called slate mailers is hitting voter households at a fast and furious pace. Slate mailer organizations are uniquely defined and regulated by the California Political Reform Act.
NEWS
August 18, 2002
Re "Return to Sender," Aug. 11: The Times' call for further controls on campaign mail is a cry for censorship of political speech. The slate mailers you seek to banish are often the only way non-wealthy candidates can afford to get their message out. Restricting political giving and speech only helps wealthy incumbents. Of seven countywide incumbents in the March primary, six were reelected. Five ran opposed. Further campaign controls will make county elections even more lopsided. Current restrictions are so skewed to protect incumbents that when the rare challenger, such as myself, does win, some call for even further controls on political mail.
NEWS
August 18, 2002
Re "Return to Sender," Aug. 11: The Times' call for further controls on campaign mail is a cry for censorship of political speech. The slate mailers you seek to banish are often the only way non-wealthy candidates can afford to get their message out. Restricting political giving and speech only helps wealthy incumbents. Of seven countywide incumbents in the March primary, six were reelected. Five ran opposed. Further campaign controls will make county elections even more lopsided. Current restrictions are so skewed to protect incumbents that when the rare challenger, such as myself, does win, some call for even further controls on political mail.
OPINION
August 11, 2002
As dubious as the information in campaign mailers might be, somebody out there must be reading them. An awful lot of money and argument goes into them each election season. The latest argument has been about slate mailers, which once were just a list of recommended candidates and stands on ballot measures. They most likely would purport to advise you how the environmentalists or an anti-tax group wanted you to vote. Slate mailers, though, are evolving in a troubling way.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|