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Slave Trade

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
That lurid back page ad in Tuesday's Hollywood Reporter raised more than ad revenues--it raised hackles. And even some Reporter staffers are upset. Said one: "The mood is very strange (here)." The full-pager, touting Heritage Entertainment's "Slave: A True Story" project, pictures a young woman in shredded clothes hanging helpless by her bound wrists, silenced by a blood-red rubber ball jammed into her mouth.
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SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists have mapped the effects of war, colonization, trade, migration and slavery on the genetic mixing of humans over the bulk of recorded history and created an online interactive atlas of humanity's genetic history. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Science, researchers detailed the genetic mixing between 95 populations across Europe, Africa, Asia and South America during 100 historical events over the last 4,000 years. The events covered in the interactive atlas include the expansion of the Mongol empire by Genghis Khan, the Arab slave trade, the so-called Bantu expansion into Southern Africa, and European colonialism.
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SCIENCE
November 29, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Maugh is a Times staff writer.
Texas researchers have discovered the wreck of the slave ship Trouvadore, which slammed into a reef off the coast of the Turks and Caicos Islands in 1841, freeing the 193 Africans who were being brought to the U.S. South for a life of servitude. It is the only known wreck of a ship involved in the illegal slave trade, said marine archaeologist Don Keith, president of the underwater archaeology institute Ships of Discovery in Corpus Christi, Texas.
WORLD
June 27, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
GOREE ISLAND, Senegal - President Obama stared pensively out the “door of no return,” described in Senegal as the last exit for those boarding ships bound for the Americas, in a house where children, women and men were separated and shackled on their way to slavery. Obama, whose father was Kenyan and whose Kansan mother is believed to have had at least one slave among her ancestors, spent about a half hour in the two-story salmon-colored house filled with cramped cells that held slaves before their passage to America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | DENISE HAMILTON
Authorities who raided a suspected house of prostitution in a Rosemead neighborhood said they now believe it was part of a larger organized crime operation that stretched from Asia to the western United States. Saying there is ample evidence of a "slave trade, 1990s-style," an El Monte Municipal Court judge ordered two Rosemead residents to stand trial on charges of pimping and pandering in connection with four young Thai women who were smuggled into the United States to work as prostitutes.
BOOKS
November 16, 1997 | BASIL DAVIDSON, Basil Davidson is the author of more than 20 books on Africa and the slave trade, including most recently "The Black Man's Burden: Africa and the Curse of the Nation-State."
The story of the Atlantic slave trade with Africa has remained a gruesome horror of loss and cruelty ever since it groaned to a reluctant halt some 130 years ago. But for a lot of folk in the slaving ports of northern Europe, even in my now very modern city of Bristol, the grim old presence has stayed somewhat closer than that.
NEWS
January 21, 2008 | Marcus Rediker, Marcus Rediker is the author of "The Slave Ship: A Human History."
IN 1965, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered a speech on Human Rights Day in New York. In his call for opposition to apartheid in South Africa, he spoke about the common history of the United States and Africa. He addressed "one of the blackest pages of our history" -- our participation in "the infamous African slave trade."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1995 | From Religion News Service
The American Historical Assn., in what was termed a "very rare" action, has passed a resolution condemning as false statements claiming that Jews played a major role in the black slave trade. "The AHA deplores any misuse of history that distorts the historical record to demonize or demean a particular racial, ethnic, religious or cultural group," the brief resolution said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1996 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Teryl Watkins learned that she had a shot at bringing to Los Angeles a major exhibition featuring artifacts from a slaving vessel that sank nearly 300 years ago, she was ecstatic. But when she looked at the exhibit catalog, disappointment set in. What bothered her, she said, was that organizers of the traveling display minimized the horror of the slave trade and favored an interpretation that focused on Europe and Europeans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
The horror of the African slave trade, particularly the experience of African American slaves, has been documented by so many historians, novelists, playwrights and poets that it is tempting to view the PBS documentary "Prince Among Slaves" as just another way to celebrate Black History Month. This would be a grave mistake.
WORLD
June 27, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
DAKAR, Senegal - President Obama arrived in this corner of West Africa to deliver messages about civil society and good governance, democracy and development. Senegal's message to him was simpler: Welcome home. The greeting was plastered on signs and T-shirts wherever Obama went Thursday during his first full day of a weeklong, three-country trip to Africa. Although Obama was born and largely raised in Hawaii, his father was born and is buried in Kenya, and on this day Senegal treated the president as one of its own. Lampposts were covered with signs reading, "Welcome home, Mr. President.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
"Cloud Atlas," based on the 2004 novel by David Mitchell, tells six nested stories spanning several hundred years and three continents. Cast members including Tom Hanks, Halle Berry and Jim Broadbent play multiple interconnected roles across the centuries. 1. In 1849 in the remote South Pacific, where the slave trade is flourishing, Dr. Goose (Hanks) administers medicine of dubious value to naive traveler Adam Ewing (Jim Sturgess). Ewing's peculiar connection to a slave creates trouble aboard their ship.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - For genealogists, President Obama's family tree is the gift that keeps on giving. There was Dick Cheney, Warren Buffett and Sarah Palin. On Monday, genealogists added another notable figure to Obama's unlikely list of relatives: John Punch, a Virginia slave who some historians consider the first African enslaved in the colonies. The connection to Punch, an indentured servant forced into slavery in 1640, comes from Obama's mother's side of the family, said Joseph Shumway, a genealogist with Ancestry.com, the website that has been researching the president's family tree for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Eve Begley Kiehm
"I have no color on the brain; all I have on the brain is paint. " — Robert Duncanson Young Robert Duncanson dipped the paint brush into the paint pot and carefully outlined the wood window frame of his customer's house near Cincinnati. He was tired. It was a hot day. And, most importantly, he was tired of painting houses. "What I really want to paint are beautiful places," he said aloud. Almost everywhere he looked he saw pictures. In the fields and the trees, in the hills and the rivers.
WORLD
August 25, 2009 | Scott Kraft
The dawn rose over lushly carpeted mountains and broke gently along the miles of powdery white beach in the village improbably named River No. 2. It was Sunday and, for most of Sierra Leone, a day of rest. But for this community, it was a workday -- the busiest of the week. Patrick Bendu met the fishing boats that bobbed in the Atlantic surf. A chef and a tough bargainer, he selected two handsome, silvery barracuda, each measuring more than 4 feet long, and handed over 160,000 leones, about $50. A fire was being stoked to cook the fish for the visitors who would soon arrive, having decamped from the urban cacophony of Freetown, a rugged hour's drive away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan
Philip D. Curtin, a historian of the African slave trade who after World War II was a leading figure in reviving the neglected field of African history, has died. He was 87. Curtin, who was awarded a MacArthur Foundation grant in 1983, died June 4 of pneumonia at Chester County Hospital in West Chester, Pa.
BOOKS
April 28, 2002 | ROBIN BLACKBURN, Robin Blackburn teaches history at the New School University in New York and is the author of "The Making of New World Slavery."
The Atlantic trade in slaves and slave produce in the 18th century is sometimes wrongly associated with the state-organized world of colonial mercantilism rather than with the birth of free trade. The Spanish trade in silver did furnish the basis for a well-organized colonial system.
OPINION
February 9, 2009 | Gregory Rodriguez
If a 10-year-old boy in Benin, in West Africa, wants to describe someone he doesn't trust, he's likely to use one of these two roughly translated phrases: "He will sell you and enjoy it" or "He can make you disappear." Such phrases are not uncommon in the languages of West Africa, which for four centuries was the epicenter of the continent's slave trade, and their presence in contemporary speech poignantly suggests that slavery's legacy lingers on in profound ways.
OPINION
February 9, 2009 | Gregory Rodriguez
If a 10-year-old boy in Benin, in West Africa, wants to describe someone he doesn't trust, he's likely to use one of these two roughly translated phrases: "He will sell you and enjoy it" or "He can make you disappear." Such phrases are not uncommon in the languages of West Africa, which for four centuries was the epicenter of the continent's slave trade, and their presence in contemporary speech poignantly suggests that slavery's legacy lingers on in profound ways.
OPINION
January 8, 2009
The story of Shyima Hall, who was brought to this country as a slave at age 10 and forced to work from dawn to midnight in the home of a wealthy Egyptian family living in Irvine, has been told around the world. According to news reports, the child ironed clothes, mopped floors, made beds and groomed the family's hair. She slept in the garage. She did not attend school or have any days off. Now 19, Shyima had been leased to Amal and Nasser Ibrahim by her mother when they lived in Egypt.
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