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WORLD
February 1, 2006 | Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
This nation has become one of the largest markets in the trafficking of women from nearby former Soviet states who have been forced into prostitution, with profits from the illicit sex trade in Turkey an estimated $3.6 billion last year and growing, an international agency said in a report released Tuesday. About 5,000 women, more than half from Moldova and Ukraine, are believed to be working as sex slaves in Turkey, an agency official said.
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TRAVEL
April 27, 2014
The inside viewof Hanalei Just a quick note to say Christopher Reynolds did a great job representing Hanalei ["Rooted in Kauai," April 20]. As a born and raised Kauaian (who grew up on Weke Road), I must say I was surprised to open the paper at my current home in California and see my hometown taking over a full spread. Reynolds did a great job representing the island and calling out all the best restaurants and things to do - exactly the list I've sent to friends looking for Kauai recommendations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998
Re "The Faces of Slavery," editorial, Oct. 26: Thank you for saying what all Americans must someday understand and accept. Slavery is the history of us all. Only when we understand this will we truly be able to bury racism and bigotry in its permanent grave. TOM HENNESSY Altadena
TRAVEL
April 20, 2014
Mixed views on Charleston I'm glad Alice Short highlighted the most troubling aspect of visiting Charleston, S.C., in her cover article ["In a New Light," April 13]. What is on the surface one of America's finest historic towns was built and maintained by enslaved African Americans whose history is mostly hidden and unspoken, while the Confederate past is celebrated. The only thing that "saved" our stay in Charleston was Alphonso Brown's wonderful Gullah Tour ( www.gullahtours.com )
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2011 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A decade ago, Shyima Hall was smuggled into the United States as a 10-year-old slave, forced to cook and clean inside the home of a wealthy Irvine family and, at night, sleep on a squalid mattress in a windowless garage. On Thursday, the Egyptian-born 22-year-old stood before a federal judge in Montebello with nearly 900 others and was sworn in as naturalized U.S. citizen. The ceremony capped a hard-scrabble journey that began with Hall's rescue, wound through the foster care system and ended with her living on her own, working, and with ambitions to become a federal agent.
OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "Dim view of orca bill in San Diego," March 9 Breeding, capturing, selling or imprisoning orcas should be banned. Most of all, forcing them to perform should be illegal. These magnificent denizens of the deep (and not of Sea World's shallow ponds) are the slaves of the animal world. Forced to perform unnatural acts for food and care, they are far from freedom in the pods to which they belong. The excuse that they are essential to the economy of San Diego is akin to one of the excuses for the sorry chapter of our past known as slavery.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Barraged by expressions of outrage, Adidas announced Monday evening that it's pulling a shoe design that critics say evokes slavery. The design, by eccentric Beverly Hills designer Jeremy Scott, features a plastic set of shackles. Initially it was met with disbelief, then fury, especially in online arenas. On Twitter, the shoes were labeled "Adidas slave shackle kicks. " Talk of a boycott arose. Early Monday, Adidas defended the shoes as the handiwork of a whimsical designer.
OPINION
May 9, 2002
The American public appears to be almost completely in the dark concerning a worldwide problem: slavery. "Smuggling by Airline Guards Feared" (May 6) states, "In one LAX case two years ago, two employees of a security firm pleaded guilty to federal charges for trying to smuggle in three Thai women who arrived as transit passengers on a Korean Air flight from Seoul. "The scheme, foiled by the employees' supervisor, involved swapping the women--allegedly destined for employment at a massage parlor--with three impostors who were to take their outbound seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998
Slavery is not entertaining, but then again, every movie isn't meant to entertain ("How Entertaining Is Slavery?" by Greg Braxton, Oct. 18). We all need to realize that movies teach, inform and disturb. It's an art form and art is supposed to wake us up, maybe show us something that we didn't know before we came in contact with it. Braxton tells the story of the African American woman who ran out of the theater during "Amistad." The Middle Passage scenes of slaves being whipped, starved, abused and murdered on a slave ship are horrifying.
OPINION
July 11, 2008
Re "No way that China will settle for silver," July 8 Let's get this straight: 6- and 7-year-olds are "plucked" from their families, spend years and years in intense training and are expected to do what they're told without complaining -- with little or no say on whether they'd like to participate in this quest for "national glory." Sounds like some form of slavery to me. Or, at the very least, a human rights violation. With China's dismal human rights record, why on Earth was it awarded an Olympic Games in the first place?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
A votive in a glass holder, etched with the Star of David and the words "In memory," sits on the granite table. "We will remember the terrible tragedy," Ron Wolfson says, referring to the previous day's shootings at two Jewish facilities in Kansas. The three deaths seem particularly painful on this Monday night Seder, which marks the start of Passover, the eight-day Jewish celebration of the Israelites' flight from bondage in Egypt. Wolfson and his wife are gathered in their Encino home with four generations - 16 people in all, family and friends from as far as New York.
TRAVEL
April 13, 2014
Vincent Bevins wrote that, "São Paulo was built by immigrants from Italy, Japan, Portugal and Lebanon, among others... " ["Culture by Day, Partying by Night," March 30]. That is quite an interesting tidbit about the place that received the majority of the slaves shipped to the Americas. I suppose they are the "among others. " John Anderson Chicago Airlines horror story We recently returned from Amman, Jordan, using Air France business class to Paris, and experienced a new level of disservice.
OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "Dim view of orca bill in San Diego," March 9 Breeding, capturing, selling or imprisoning orcas should be banned. Most of all, forcing them to perform should be illegal. These magnificent denizens of the deep (and not of Sea World's shallow ponds) are the slaves of the animal world. Forced to perform unnatural acts for food and care, they are far from freedom in the pods to which they belong. The excuse that they are essential to the economy of San Diego is akin to one of the excuses for the sorry chapter of our past known as slavery.
OPINION
March 7, 2014
Re "Waiting for 'Years,'" March 4 When a significant segment of the American experience can be artfully portrayed as slavery was in "12 Years a Slave," perhaps we have matured enough to embrace other significant parts of our history. Some brave filmmaker should step forward and bring his or her art to the American experience of 1862, when President Lincoln was dealing with the Emancipation Proclamation on one hand while on the other agonizing over the execution order for the 300 American Indians involved in Minnesota's Sioux Uprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By John Horn
Not long after Steve McQueen's "12 Years a Slave" premiered at the Telluride Film Festival last August, a friend cautioned the British director that his movie was "more important than you. " It turned out to be far truer than anyone, including McQueen, might have guessed. Nearly half a year after McQueen's searing retelling of the 1841 enslavement of Solomon Northup was first shown to moviegoers, "12 Years a Slave" remains the year's hot button movie, with McQueen the thoughtful and sometimes stubborn voice at the center of the conversation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - For the second straight year, a story taken from the pages of American history triumphed at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards, with "12 Years a Slave" winning prizes for best film and for leading actor Chiwetel Ejiofor. In a mild upset, Alfonso Cuarón, director of the space odyssey "Gravity," beat out "12 Years a Slave's" Steve McQueen as best director. Cate Blanchett took lead actress honors for "Blue Jasmine" and promptly dedicated her award to the memory of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who died this month of an apparent drug overdose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1997
I think a governmental apology for slavery is a wonderful idea (June 13-14). In fact, it's such a wonderful idea that it's already enshrined in the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments of the Constitution. Those who do not regard this as sufficient might want to check out such locales as Shiloh, Antietam, Gettysburg--and a certain mausoleum in Illinois--where the apology was issued in blood. On a less visceral note, it should be pointed out that the U.S. government never enslaved anyone.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Mississippi forgot something. Fully 148 years after the end of the Civil War and the U.S. end to slavery, the state has officially ratified the 13th Amendment ban on the practice. The state thought the amendment had already been ratified by its Legislature. Turns out it hadn't, at least in the eyes of federal record-keepers. "It was never transmitted to the national archivist to be put on the record," Pamela Weaver, spokeswoman for the Mississippi secretary of state, told The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - In the film "12 Years a Slave," free black man Solomon Northup dreams of one thing during his long captivity in the antebellum South: returning to his family and home in Saratoga Springs. In the film, as Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, undergoes grueling labor and horrific punishment on a series of Southern plantations, Saratoga Springs becomes a promised land, its name uttered with a sense of longing and hope. Yet mention Northup's name to many locals in modern-day Saratoga Springs or ask about the memoir or movie that tells his story and they'll raise an eyebrow, largely unaware of the man and his legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Amasa Delano, a New England sea captain sailing off the Chilean coast in February 1805, thought he was helping a ship in distress when he boarded the Tryal with an offer of food, water and assistance. Adrift in dangerous waters, its worn hull covered with barnacles and trailing seaweed, the Tryal was, indeed, in distress. But not in the manner Delano suspected. The Tryal was a Spanish slaver on which the slaves had revolted two months earlier, killing most of their captors while sparing Capt.
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