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Slavery Brazil

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WORLD
September 16, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO - Melanito Biyouha tries to remember the languages she's heard today at her restaurant in Sao Paulo's African corner. "English, Bassa, Wolof, Swahili, umm … Lingala," she said. "And of course Portuguese, both with Angolan, Mozambican and Brazilian accents. " She speaks Portuguese with a Cameroonian accent, she said. Almost 500 years since slavery set Brazil on the path to establishing the largest African-heritage population outside Africa, Biyouha's restaurant has become a home base for the first significant voluntary influx of Africans into the country.
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NEWS
July 28, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This reissue of an American bestseller of 150 years ago brings us not only a remarkable man's gripping tale of his journey through an exotic land, but also a fine window into the American mind of the 1850s. The young nation had been independent barely 75 years but was feeling its oats: It had just seized half the territory of Mexico, and California with all its gold was newly admitted into the Union. To the young republic, the future seemed dazzlingly bright.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1995 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House of Deputies on Wednesday approved a constitutional amendment to open Brazil's oil industry to private and foreign investment, a step that economists and political leaders said foreshadows a dramatic leap forward for a bundle of economic and social reforms that could transform South America's largest economy.
WORLD
October 6, 2012 | By Matthew Teague, Los Angeles Times
ELDORADO DOS CARAJAS, Brazil - At 4 in the afternoon on April 17, 1996, a 13-year-old girl with blond hair climbed onto a truck stopped on a road in the Amazon basin. From the top, Ana Paula Silva - known for a long time after as "the girl" - could see everything. More than a thousand protesters had gathered on the road outside a village called Eldorado dos Carajas. People called them the sem terra , the landless. They sharecropped for large landowners, and they were among the poorest people in a country of very many poor and very few rich.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mestre Didi, the leader of an Afro-Brazilian cult of the dead, is a 6th-generation descendant of African slaves. He has traced his ancestors back across the South Atlantic, visited their West African homelands and learned the archaic Yoruba language they spoke. Like Mestre Didi, more than half of Brazil's 145 million people have African ancestors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988 | VICTOR VALLE
I nsects strike a corner street light, a dog settles into the dust and, from a nearby doorway, a television set casts its chalky ray into the hot night. The TV set is one of the first to arrive in Juanjui, a remote Peruvian village of 13,000 in the eastern Andes Mountains, and dozens of neighbors place chairs in the street to watch their first "Miami Vice" rerun.
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