Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSlawomir Idziak
IN THE NEWS

Slawomir Idziak

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
On Hollywood's shamefully slim list of movies dealing with American slavery, there are next to none about the attitudes of non-plantation whites toward the runaways they encountered. Or about the relationships that were often forged between them. We've got Huck Finn and Jim and that's about it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It is a mark of the virtuosity with which director Krzysztof Kieslowski has made "Blue" that it is possible to envision its intensely emotional story of a woman's search for meaning after tragedy unhinges her life becoming, with slight tinkering, the plot for a standard-issue Bette Davis "women's picture" of the 1940s. Yet there is nothing ordinary or banal about the way Kieslowski, a Polish director now working in France, has gone about his business here.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Last September," a luminous, piercing film from the Elizabeth Bowen novel, richly evokes a world of privilege on the verge of disintegration. The time is the fall of 1920 in County Cork, and the setting is a grand country estate of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, caught between the British forces who will soon be defeated by the Irish rebels fighting for independence, bringing an end to British rule in Southern Ireland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
There's a scene in Krzysztof Zanussi's "A Year of the Quiet Sun" (opening Friday at the Cineplex Beverly Center) where Zanussi and his actors--Scott Wilson and Maja Komorowska--seem to show the exact moment when a man falls in love with a woman: when his mind makes her into someone he cannot live without. As it comes, it's shocking--perhaps because the cynicism of recent movies dulls your expectations, or perhaps because you recognize it so deeply.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Black Hawk Down" is more than simply, as the opening title says, "Based on an Actual Event." As much as a movie ever has, it puts you completely inside that event, brilliantly taking you where most people, even those who were actually there, wouldn't want to be. For "realism" is a mild word for the way director Ridley Scott sweepingly re-creates 1993's fierce 15-hour battle between besieged U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
In the brave new world of writer-director Andrew Niccol's "Gattaca," genetics is God. People are designed in petri dishes, not conceived in passion. Their gene pools are swept and filtered to remove any potential of mental or physical imperfection, and they arrive in the world naked as ever but genetically dressed for success. Not so the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
When John Sayles was out promoting his critically acclaimed and darn near commercial "Lone Star" a couple of years ago, he was inevitably asked what he intended to do next. He said he was writing a script with a political backdrop set in Latin America, and that it would be in Spanish and Indian dialects, with subtitles, with an all-Latino cast--if someone will pay for it. Up stepped Sony Pictures Classics, which agreed to buy the rights to North America, England and Latin America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Sexed up, tricked out and totally ready to party, "King Arthur" enters the summer fray with consummate New World vulgarity. Set during the 5th century against a backdrop of warring British interests, Roman conquerors and Saxon invaders, this frantic period entertainment retells this beloved Britannic foundation myth with big-bang razzmatazz and high Hollywood camp. It's the Arthurian legends, a PlayStation Passion play and a Jerry Bruckheimer lollapalooza rolled into one.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski is one of the most accomplished and daring of modern directors but, because of legal problems, his masterpiece, the 10-hour "Decalogue," has only been exhibited in this country at film festivals. His new film, "The Double Life of Veronique" (selected theaters), may be his ticket to notoriety in the United States but, if so, it will be something of a hollow victory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
What a lot of stories need, at their center, is a really rotten subordinate character to capture our hearts and minds. "Othello" has Iago, for instance. In "Paradise Lost," Satan manages to steal most of the scenes. In "Commandments"--a promising debut by writer-director Daniel Taplitz--it's Anthony LaPaglia. LaPaglia's Harry Luce--journalist, adulterer and all-around ne'er-do-well--isn't the centerpiece of the story.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|