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Sleater Kinney

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2006 | By Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
INDIO -- "I see how the desert can be a spiritual place. " Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney was reacting to the afternoon scene in front of her, addressing thousands of sun-baked music fans gathered near the big stage Sunday at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. Like others on the bill, Sleater-Kinney is an esteemed indie-rock band accustomed to creating its loud, contemplative sounds in theaters. But the annual festival takes things to an epic scale, delivering adventurous rock, dance, hip-hop and other sounds to a massive audience hungry for the challenge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Corin Tucker isn't joking when she describes her new album as a dance record. Six years removed from her days as a co-anchor of Sleater-Kinney, one of the defining bands of the Pacific Northwest's riot grrrl movement, Tucker speaks today of having rediscovered her love of rock 'n' roll. It's landed her, she says, on a rather "groovy planet. " The recently released "Kill My Blues," the second album with her Corin Tucker Band, does away with the more atmospheric, singer-songwriter leanings of 2010's "1,000 Years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Cadallaca makes raw, quirky pop that is just sloppy enough to be charming. The trio is a side-project for singer-guitarist Corin Tucker of the acclaimed Sleater-Kinney, but the result is similar, if less intense punk-flavored pop. At the Troubadour on Friday, Cadallaca worked the same roads regularly traveled by Sleater-Kinney, but with the added flavor of the simple, playful organ of Sarah Dougher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2010 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Arianna Forster, better known to her fans as Ari Up of the influential punk band the Slits, died of an undisclosed illness Wednesday in Los Angeles, her stepfather, John Lydon ? a.k.a. Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols ? announced on his website . She was 48. Born in Germany but raised in London, Forster was exposed to influential musicians at an early age. Her mother, Nora Forster, was active in London's bohemian scene in the 1960s and '70s, and as a result, the younger Forster's upbringing was flush with music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Corin Tucker isn't joking when she describes her new album as a dance record. Six years removed from her days as a co-anchor of Sleater-Kinney, one of the defining bands of the Pacific Northwest's riot grrrl movement, Tucker speaks today of having rediscovered her love of rock 'n' roll. It's landed her, she says, on a rather "groovy planet. " The recently released "Kill My Blues," the second album with her Corin Tucker Band, does away with the more atmospheric, singer-songwriter leanings of 2010's "1,000 Years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2010 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Arianna Forster, better known to her fans as Ari Up of the influential punk band the Slits, died of an undisclosed illness Wednesday in Los Angeles, her stepfather, John Lydon ? a.k.a. Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols ? announced on his website . She was 48. Born in Germany but raised in London, Forster was exposed to influential musicians at an early age. Her mother, Nora Forster, was active in London's bohemian scene in the 1960s and '70s, and as a result, the younger Forster's upbringing was flush with music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The women of Sleater-Kinney are not trying to be discovered. They seem thrilled enough with their place in the indie-rock underground, as dependable heroes in their own punk-rock world, bringing springy buzz tones and furious combat rock to fans ready to listen. No Gap ads in Sleater-Kinney's future. "You guys are rowdy, that's good," singer-guitarist Carrie Brownstein said from the stage at the Highlands on Wednesday, the first of two nights at the Hollywood venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Aggressive as their music often is, the members of Sleater-Kinney demand civilized behavior from their audiences, and the punk-pop trio has never hesitated to confront unruly fans. But on Friday at the Roxy, a worshipful crowd fanned the flames of an already fiery performance. The group was engaging from the start--and riveting by the end--of its hourlong set.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
"I wanna be your Joey Ramone," Sleater-Kinney's Corin Tucker sings in the song of the same name, an imprecation not to join the boys' punk club, but to lay claim to some of that veteran provocateur's rough-edged swagger. A female trio that hatched in Olympia, Wash.'s fertile indie-rock scene, Sleater-Kinney, which sold out two shows at the El Rey Theatre this week, is currently making a strong case for being, as Tucker sings in "Joey Ramone," the queens of rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
The three women from Olympia, Wash., have sure resisted any temptation to expand the pop playfulness that crept into their last album, "Dig Me Out." Brittle, demanding and severe, "The Hot Rock" (due Tuesday) is true to Sleater-Kinney's roots in the short-lived but influential Riot Grrrl movement--particularly its indifference to trends and its resistance to marketability.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2006 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
Sleater-Kinney, arguably the most respected rock band of the post-Nirvana era next to Radiohead, played its final concert Saturday at the Crystal Ballroom. The second of a two-night hometown farewell, the concert sold out in five minutes and attracted fans from as far as Los Angeles and New York. Don't feel too bad, however, if you didn't know it was coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2006 | By Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
INDIO -- "I see how the desert can be a spiritual place. " Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney was reacting to the afternoon scene in front of her, addressing thousands of sun-baked music fans gathered near the big stage Sunday at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. Like others on the bill, Sleater-Kinney is an esteemed indie-rock band accustomed to creating its loud, contemplative sounds in theaters. But the annual festival takes things to an epic scale, delivering adventurous rock, dance, hip-hop and other sounds to a massive audience hungry for the challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The women of Sleater-Kinney are not trying to be discovered. They seem thrilled enough with their place in the indie-rock underground, as dependable heroes in their own punk-rock world, bringing springy buzz tones and furious combat rock to fans ready to listen. No Gap ads in Sleater-Kinney's future. "You guys are rowdy, that's good," singer-guitarist Carrie Brownstein said from the stage at the Highlands on Wednesday, the first of two nights at the Hollywood venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
"I wanna be your Joey Ramone," Sleater-Kinney's Corin Tucker sings in the song of the same name, an imprecation not to join the boys' punk club, but to lay claim to some of that veteran provocateur's rough-edged swagger. A female trio that hatched in Olympia, Wash.'s fertile indie-rock scene, Sleater-Kinney, which sold out two shows at the El Rey Theatre this week, is currently making a strong case for being, as Tucker sings in "Joey Ramone," the queens of rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Cadallaca makes raw, quirky pop that is just sloppy enough to be charming. The trio is a side-project for singer-guitarist Corin Tucker of the acclaimed Sleater-Kinney, but the result is similar, if less intense punk-flavored pop. At the Troubadour on Friday, Cadallaca worked the same roads regularly traveled by Sleater-Kinney, but with the added flavor of the simple, playful organ of Sarah Dougher.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2006 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
Sleater-Kinney, arguably the most respected rock band of the post-Nirvana era next to Radiohead, played its final concert Saturday at the Crystal Ballroom. The second of a two-night hometown farewell, the concert sold out in five minutes and attracted fans from as far as Los Angeles and New York. Don't feel too bad, however, if you didn't know it was coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even cultural revolutions have their ups and downs. And right now indie rock is a merely dependable pop music genre, with much of value to offer but little of surprise, nearly a decade after the explosion of Nirvana into the mainstream. On Sunday at Irvine's Oak Park Ranch, the "This Ain't No Picnic" festival gathered a solid cross-section of music rooted in punk, all in search of common ground in a world momentarily obsessed with romantic pop sung by actresses and teenagers.
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