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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
Athletes in wheelchairs are now a common sight at 10-K runs and even marathons. Dave Conklin hopes to add hockey to the sports in which the physically disabled can compete. Conklin, captain of the U.S. Sled Hockey Team, was in Anaheim on Wednesday to lead a clinic for wheelchair athletes and other participants in the city's therapeutic recreation program and to generate interest in a sled hockey program for children and adults.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
Athletes in wheelchairs are now a common sight at 10-K runs and even marathons. Dave Conklin hopes to add hockey to the sports in which the physically disabled can compete. Conklin, captain of the U.S. Sled Hockey Team, was in Anaheim on Wednesday to lead a clinic for wheelchair athletes and other participants in the city's therapeutic recreation program and to generate interest in a sled hockey program for children and adults.
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SPORTS
October 3, 2012 | By Helene Elliott, Los Angeles Times
Defensemen who wouldn't hesitate to block wicked slap shots with their faces are considered tough, but they have nothing over 9-year-old hockey player Genny Shepler of Forest Falls. Brawny enforcers are applauded when they avenge their teammates' honor, but they're not as brave as the brown-haired girl who wore a Kings shirt and had a black balloon tied to her wheelchair with purple ribbon as she greeted the Stanley Cup on Tuesday at the HealthBridge Children's Hospital in Orange.
SPORTS
March 28, 2013 | Helene Elliott
Trey Wilson can't hear the crowd applaud when he scores a goal, and he has scored quite a few since he discovered hockey was a perfect outlet for his energy. The 25-year-old left wing from Riverside was born deaf, which means he can't hear the crunch of skates on ice or the shrill tweet of a referee's whistle, sounds as integral to hockey as pucks and sticks. To Wilson, not being able to hear isn't a problem. It certainly hasn't prevented him from excelling at the sport he took to naturally and without fear of being at a disadvantage.
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