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Sleep Apnea

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HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Many people with sleep apnea are not aware that they have it. Because the disorder is so prevalent, sleep experts say that doctors should routinely ask patients about the quality of their sleep. If you suspect that you or someone you know might have sleep apnea, it is important to seek medical advice. Symptoms include loud snoring, gasping and pauses in breathing while you sleep; high blood pressure; daytime sleepiness; and cognitive impairment. Diagnosis usually requires an overnight sleep evaluation.
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NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The engineer of a train that derailed after speeding into a tight curve, killing four passengers, suffered from a "severe" sleep disorder, investigators said Monday in a report after the train operator's admission that he "zoned out" shortly before the wreck.  A report from the National Transportation Safety Board included a detailed account of engineer William Rockefeller's medical reports, and the transcript of an interview investigators...
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NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Having severe sleep apnea may make people more at risk for silent strokes and small brain lesions, researchers found. A study presented this week at the American Stroke Assn.'s International Stroke Conference in New Orleans focused on 56 people, average age 67, who had had strokes. They were tested for sleep apnea and underwent magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scans, which were reviewed by a radiologist who didn't know the results of the apnea tests. Almost all (91%)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Jason Wells
The family of a 13-year-old Oakland girl who became brain dead after having her tonsils removed plans to seek a court injunction Friday blocking the hospital from taking her off life support over the holidays. Doctors at Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland performed the tonsillectomy Dec. 9, hoping to cure Jahi McMath's sleep apnea, weight gain and other afflictions. But soon after her surgery, Jahi's condition quickly deteriorated, her family said. Jahi went into cardiac arrest and the flow of oxygen to her brain was cut off.  The next day, a CT scan showed two-thirds of Jahi's brain had swollen.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE
The most recent federal statistics available show that truck drivers continue to lead other professions by a wide margin in the number of injuries and illnesses that result in lost workdays. Most experts attribute the truck accident problem to driver fatigue, primarily on long haul routes. A nearly four-decade-old federal regulation known as the "Hours of Service" rule still allows truckers to drive 10 hours before taking an eight-hour rest break.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The engineer of a train that derailed after speeding into a tight curve, killing four passengers, suffered from a "severe" sleep disorder, investigators said Monday in a report after the train operator's admission that he "zoned out" shortly before the wreck.  A report from the National Transportation Safety Board included a detailed account of engineer William Rockefeller's medical reports, and the transcript of an interview investigators...
NATIONAL
November 19, 2002 | From Reuters
Stuttering and a serious form of snoring known as sleep apnea may be linked, and both conditions may be caused by brain damage sustained early in life, U.S. researchers said Monday. A team at UCLA found that nearly 40% of sleep apnea patients it studied also stuttered as children. Sleep apnea is a serious form of snoring in which a patient's breathing actually stops several times a night. It is linked with a high rate of heart death.
HEALTH
March 28, 2005 | From Reuters
Patients with sleep apnea are more likely to die from heart attacks at night, while sleeping, than in the day, which is the time when everyone else is most vulnerable, researchers have found. Most heart attacks in the United States take place between dawn and noon, but sleep apnea -- marked by a tendency to snore, stop breathing and then startle awake -- changes this pattern, researchers said.
HEALTH
August 12, 2002 | DIANNE PARTIE LANGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Studies have shown that people with sleep apnea are at risk for a host of chronic health problems, including cardiovascular disease. But whether sleep apnea--a temporary disruption of breathing during sleep--actually leads to the more serious health problem has not been investigated. Now Swedish researchers who followed a group of 182 men with the breathing disorder found that at least one cardiovascular problem occurred in about a third of them during a seven-year period.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Snoring in children may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea, a common but under-diagnosed condition that has been linked to learning problems, slow growth and even bed-wetting and high blood pressure, new pediatricians' guidelines say. All children's routine checkups should include questions about snoring to better diagnose the syndrome, which can often be cured by surgery to remove tonsils and adenoids, according to the guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Having severe sleep apnea may make people more at risk for silent strokes and small brain lesions, researchers found. A study presented this week at the American Stroke Assn.'s International Stroke Conference in New Orleans focused on 56 people, average age 67, who had had strokes. They were tested for sleep apnea and underwent magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scans, which were reviewed by a radiologist who didn't know the results of the apnea tests. Almost all (91%)
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Michelle Andrews, Kaiser Health News
The diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders have come a long way in recent years. In the past, people who snored might be advised to sew a tennis ball onto the back of their pajama top. The "snore ball" would discourage them from sleeping on their back and might quiet their droning. Or a doctor might use the "dog index" to measure poor sleep: If your dog generally sleeps with you but by morning has left the bed more than half the time, it may be because you're such a loud, restless sleeper that the dog has gone elsewhere for some peace and quiet.
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The "other" sleep apnea Central sleep apnea is much less common than obstructive sleep apnea, accounting for only about 5% to 10% of total cases. In central sleep apnea, people stop breathing while asleep, "not because of an obstruction in the upper airway but rather because the brain does not send a signal to breathe," says Dr. Phyllis Zee, a professor of neurology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and an expert in sleep disorders. The condition can be seen in patients with congestive heart failure and in those who are on powerful pain medicines, including opiates such as methadone.
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Many people with sleep apnea are not aware that they have it. Because the disorder is so prevalent, sleep experts say that doctors should routinely ask patients about the quality of their sleep. If you suspect that you or someone you know might have sleep apnea, it is important to seek medical advice. Symptoms include loud snoring, gasping and pauses in breathing while you sleep; high blood pressure; daytime sleepiness; and cognitive impairment. Diagnosis usually requires an overnight sleep evaluation.
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For more information about sleep apnea, try these organizations: American Sleep Apnea Assn., http://www.sleepapnea.org National Sleep Foundation, http://www.sleepfoundation.org American Academy of Sleep Medicine, http://www.aasmnet.org
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | Amanda Leigh Mascarelli
As Americans' waistlines continue to grow, so does the number of people who aren't getting a good night's sleep. About 2% of women and at least 4% of men suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which the airway collapses and blocks breathing for 30 seconds or even up to a minute or two. The brain senses that it isn't receiving enough oxygen and sends a signal to the person to wake up. The awakenings are brief enough that people usually...
SCIENCE
August 1, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Sleep apnea, brief disruptions of breathing during the night that affect as many as 12 million Americans, increases the risk of death four- to sixfold, according to two new studies released today. Results from the studies "remove any reasonable doubt that sleep apnea is a fatal disease," said epidemiologist Nathaniel S. Marshall of the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research in Australia, lead author of one of the two papers published in the journal Sleep.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | GAYLE YOUNG, United Press International
Fourteen men in a recent study were asked to place small pegs into a board, recall lists of numbers and copy designs on pieces of paper. All of the men suffer from sleep apnea, a disorder that caused them to wake repeatedly during the night, starved for oxygen and with air passageways blocked. None of them could complete the tasks as well as a control group of men who suffer from other problems that prevented them from getting a good night's sleep.
HEALTH
February 28, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Big-time, bed-rattling snoring is more than just a detriment to good sleep or happy relationships. It's also a sign that airways aren't open and clear. In extreme cases, snorers spend chunks of the night gasping for breath, a dangerous condition called sleep apnea. If they could somehow open up their airways, they would breathe easier without all of the racket and without the risk. Instead of sucking air through a mask or going under the knife — two common approaches to apnea — many snorers hope they can get extra breathing room with the help of an oral appliance that fits inside the mouth.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk of coronary heart disease or death by 68% in men under the age of 70, but does not increase the risk for men over 70 or for women, researchers reported Monday. Previous studies have also found an increased risk of death linked to the night-time breathing disorder, but the studies have generally involved only small groups of patients, often those who are hospitalized, and most included few or no women. The new study, reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Assn.
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