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Sleep Disorders

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charlotte Cox lies on a table with 22 green, red, blue and yellow electrodes glued to her head. As she relaxes, the electroencephalograph machine she is wired to steadily spits out reams of graph paper filled with black zigzagging lines. Across the room, a fellow classmate, also sprawled out on a laboratory table, is having his head blown dry with an air hose so wires can be secured to his skull.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
For military personnel sent to war zones, seeing killing, maiming or dead bodies dramatically increases the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. But researchers studying service members deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq have identified another factor that may raise the risk of those psychiatric conditions by almost the same degree: a history of insomnia. In a study published Friday in the journal Sleep, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego found that sleep problems before deployment at least doubled the risk for PTSD and quadrupled it for depression.
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NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Treating a sleep disorder to improve oxygen flow through the body may also help lower the risk of dementia in older-age people, according to a new study. The research, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , must be replicated. But it's exciting nonetheless because it suggests a rare, successful measure that may prevent at least some cases of cognitive impairment. Sleep disorders such as frequent waking and hypoxia (a lack of oxygen) have been linked to other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There may be a lot of sleepy police officers out there, a study finds, with about 40% of them having at least one sleep disorder. A study released today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. looked at sleep disorders and how they affected the health and safety of 4,957 police officers in the U.S. and Canada. Among the officers 40.4% were found to have at least one sleep disorder, and 33.6% had obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which a blocked or narrowed airway causes breathing to stop and start during sleep.
HEALTH
February 5, 2001 | Benedict Carey
Sleepfoundation.org Background: This is the Internet face of the National Sleep Foundation, a nonprofit organization devoted to publicizing sleep disorders and supporting sleep research and education. The site provides general consumer information, as well as updates on what the foundation is doing. What Works: The site's quick explainers of major sleep disorders, and the group's own survey results on sleep habits, make for a clear snapshot of how sleep problems affect public health.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
German A. Nino-Murcia, 45, internationally recognized specialist on sleep disorders. Born in Ubate, Colombia, Nino-Murcia was educated at the National University of Colombia School of Medicine and completed residencies at the Philadelphia Psychiatric Center and at Thomas Jefferson University in Pennsylvania. He directed Stanford's Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Center from 1983 to 1989, educating thousands of doctors on such sleep problems as insomnia and apnea syndrome.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | DR. T. FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Although sleep patterns may change over the years, scientists know that restless sleep is not an inevitable part of aging. In fact, troubled sleep may be a sign of emotional or physical disorders and should be evaluated by a doctor or sleep specialist. At any age there are some common sleep disorders. Tossing and turning all night is one example of insomnia, but there are others.
NEWS
October 17, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A lifelong insomniac, Julie Austin never had a problem sleeping when she took a capsule of L-tryptophan. But then, in 1989, the nutritional supplement was pulled from the market after being linked to hundreds of cases of a rare blood disorder. Before it was recalled, though, Austin, 28, bought "a whole case." But when that supply was exhausted, "There was nothing to take. I don't like taking prescription sleeping pills because of the side effects. So I just stayed up all night."
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That I may tell pale-hearted fear it lies, And sleep in spite of thunder. --William Shakespeare, "Macbeth" No drug can equal sleep for its ability to erase tension, silence worries and rejuvenate a spirit damaged by the stress of a fast-paced lifestyle. For a billion members of the workaday world, it is the supreme tonic of the industrial age. And like all natural blessings, its full value is perhaps realized only when the process stops working.
SPORTS
August 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sweat streamed down Hal Sutton's face and stained his shirt Monday as he pounded balls on the practice range, trying to shake the rust from a game that has been relatively dormant the past month. This is not the time to be catching up. The PGA Championship starts Thursday, the final major of the year. Of greater interest to the 43-year-old Sutton is finding his form in time for the Ryder Cup next month. "Every morning I wake up, I feel like I've just run a marathon," he said.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Treating a sleep disorder to improve oxygen flow through the body may also help lower the risk of dementia in older-age people, according to a new study. The research, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , must be replicated. But it's exciting nonetheless because it suggests a rare, successful measure that may prevent at least some cases of cognitive impairment. Sleep disorders such as frequent waking and hypoxia (a lack of oxygen) have been linked to other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal safety panel said the trolley operator who died after her train rammed another trolley in Boston last year had ignored a red stop signal, probably because she suffered from an undiagnosed sleep disorder that caused her to briefly fall asleep. The finding came in the National Transportation Safety Board's final report on the May 2008 collision in suburban Newton, Mass., that also injured seven passengers on the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's Green Line. Testing showed the presence of doxylamine -- which is used in over-the-counter sleeping aids -- in operator Terrese Edmonds' urine.
NEWS
May 17, 2009 | Robert Mitchum
Emmanuel Michael used to think that his unusual sleep patterns were nothing more than amusing quirks. In college, he once woke up from a library snooze to find a note on his chest complaining about his loud snoring. After he became a database programmer, Michael would eat lunch quickly so he could also take a half-hour nap during his break. But when he read online about sleep disorders recently, Michael discovered that his snoring and daytime drowsiness might be a sign of sleep apnea -- a disorder that interrupts a sleeping person's breathing, sometimes dozens of times a night -- and that his health might be at risk.
HEALTH
November 3, 2008 | Francesca Lunzer Kritz, Kritz is a freelance writer.
Health insurers are sometimes better known for causing sleepless nights than for creating restful ones, but in the last few months, helping consumers get a good night's sleep has become a priority for most of the top-tier U.S. health insurance companies, including WellPoint, Aetna, Cigna, Kaiser Permanente and several Blue Cross plans. Their new programs don't involve sleeping pills. Instead, insurers are advocating the use of cognitive behavior therapy.
OPINION
March 30, 2008 | Gayle Greene and Gayle Greene, a professor of literature and women's studies at Scripps College, Claremont, is the author of "Insomniac," a first-person account of living with insomnia and an investigation of what is known about the disorder.
When a star dies from an overdose, there's a tendency to write it off as "drug abuse." That amazing combination of drugs in Heath Ledger's body, for instance -- what was he thinking? Blame the celebrity, chalk it up to reckless living, a self-destructive lifestyle, a pursuit of pleasure through recreational drugs. But the drugs that killed Ledger -- three types of benzodiazepines, an antihistamine, two pain relievers -- are all substances people take for sleep.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2008 | Rajesh Mahapatra, The Associated Press
The call center job came with a good salary and good perks, especially compared to many other opportunities for young people in India. But as 26-year-old Vaibhav Vats says, it was doing him no good. His weight grew to 265 pounds and long overnight hours gave him little time for a social life. Eventually, he quit. "You are making nice money. But the trade-off is also big," said Vats, who spent nearly two years at an IBM Corp. call center handling customer calls from the United States.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | MARIA FISHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was 4 a.m. when Anthony Scudiero started to gag on his own saliva. "My wife was sleeping light that night or it would have been sayonara , Scudiero," recalled the 60-year-old restaurant owner from Overland Park, Kan. An unconscious Scudiero was whisked by ambulance to a hospital, where he underwent a battery of tests in November. Doctors determined that Scudiero had had a seizure, but they weren't sure why. "My doctor suggested I go to St. Luke's Sleep Lab," Scudiero said.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
It's 2 a.m. and 15-month-old Matthew Griffith and the sandman are sorely out of sync. Wide-eyed and wiggly, according to his mother Nancy, Matthew wants nothing more than to play. Needless to say, such unscheduled wake-up calls can be a struggle for both babies and groggy parents. While newborns aren't expected to sleep for long nighttime stretches--at least not until age 4 months or so--about 30% of children ages 1 to 4 continue to wake during the night, say child-care specialists.
HEALTH
August 6, 2007 | Chelsea Martinez, Times Staff Writer
People tend to think of sleep problems as adult problems, connected to trouble with weight, diet, stress or depression. But more and more children are having trouble sleeping -- and more often than not, a new study finds, treatment comes in the form of a pill. The trend is concerning, the study authors say, because sleep deprivation can lead to headaches, irritability, impaired concentration and even behavior akin to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
HEALTH
May 21, 2007 | From Times wire reports
An experiment aimed at finding ways to help astronauts adapt to life on Mars could end up benefiting insomniacs on Earth. In it, researchers found that two 45-minute exposures to bright light in the evening could help people adjust to a longer, Martian-style day. "The results have powerful implications for the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including shift work disorder and advanced sleep phase disorder," said Dr.
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