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Sleeping Disorders

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NEWS
June 11, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
It wasn't until after they were married that Karen's husband found out about her bedtime, er, companions. The intruders were named Willow, Dillow, Sillow and Pillow--small, feathery pillows that were family heirlooms. They had been with her since childhood (she even took Willow and Dillow overseas on her diplomatic missions), so Karen saw no reason not to include them in the marriage. But when two sets of bedtime habits vow to become one, the results aren't always sweet dreams.
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NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There may be a lot of sleepy police officers out there, a study finds, with about 40% of them having at least one sleep disorder. A study released today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. looked at sleep disorders and how they affected the health and safety of 4,957 police officers in the U.S. and Canada. Among the officers 40.4% were found to have at least one sleep disorder, and 33.6% had obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which a blocked or narrowed airway causes breathing to stop and start during sleep.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 16, 1991 | JAN HOFMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sheep-counting not only works, it makes scientific sense. Vigorous exercise in the evening may tire you, but it also might keep you awake. And taking an afternoon nap may be the worst possible move if you're sleep-deprived. The subject of sleep is fraught with myth and misunderstanding, say sleep experts such as Dr. Paul Selecky, director of the Hoag Sleep Center at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Treating a sleep disorder to improve oxygen flow through the body may also help lower the risk of dementia in older-age people, according to a new study. The research, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , must be replicated. But it's exciting nonetheless because it suggests a rare, successful measure that may prevent at least some cases of cognitive impairment. Sleep disorders such as frequent waking and hypoxia (a lack of oxygen) have been linked to other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | SHARI ROAN and GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the dark, with a pillow pulled tight to her ear, a weary Denise Reale glared at her snoring husband before trudging to the living room couch. Another sleepless night with The Bear. "It's sooo loud," she said of the nocturnal rumblings created by Thomas, her husband of 14 years. "Our daughter has friends come over for slumber parties sometimes, and the next morning they giggle and ask about the bear upstairs. It's sort of funny, but it can create a lot of stress, too."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1986 | DELTHIA RICKS, United Press International
An ancient myth told of the plight of Undine, a nymph condemned to a life of sleeplessness out of fear that she would stop breathing while asleep and die. Modern science calls it sleep apnea. The ailment--a cessation of breathing during sleep--is also known as as "Undine's curse," and it afflicts a large number of middle-age, overweight men, many of whom unknowingly suffer the condition.
HEALTH
February 5, 2001 | Benedict Carey
Sleepfoundation.org Background: This is the Internet face of the National Sleep Foundation, a nonprofit organization devoted to publicizing sleep disorders and supporting sleep research and education. The site provides general consumer information, as well as updates on what the foundation is doing. What Works: The site's quick explainers of major sleep disorders, and the group's own survey results on sleep habits, make for a clear snapshot of how sleep problems affect public health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998 | YUNG KIM
When Cathy Hopkins woke up in the morning, the only thing she thought about was going back to sleep. No matter how many hours she slept, the self-described "world-class snorer" spent her days awake without energy and in a listless haze, concentrating on putting one foot in front of the other. Because she worked 50 to 60 hours a week as a nurse, Hopkins said she assumed her condition was the result of normal fatigue. That was until she went on a vacation with a friend last fall.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | Associated Press
Sen. Max Cleland, who has been seen nodding off during committee hearings and news conferences, said he is suffering from a sleep disorder. Cleland, a Democrat, has been diagnosed with sleep apnea, a condition that interrupts proper breathing during sleep, causing him to sleep poorly at night and become fatigued during the day, he told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "It's basically sleep deprivation," said Dr. John DelGaudio, an ear, nose and throat specialist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Treating a sleep disorder to improve oxygen flow through the body may also help lower the risk of dementia in older-age people, according to a new study. The research, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , must be replicated. But it's exciting nonetheless because it suggests a rare, successful measure that may prevent at least some cases of cognitive impairment. Sleep disorders such as frequent waking and hypoxia (a lack of oxygen) have been linked to other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal safety panel said the trolley operator who died after her train rammed another trolley in Boston last year had ignored a red stop signal, probably because she suffered from an undiagnosed sleep disorder that caused her to briefly fall asleep. The finding came in the National Transportation Safety Board's final report on the May 2008 collision in suburban Newton, Mass., that also injured seven passengers on the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's Green Line. Testing showed the presence of doxylamine -- which is used in over-the-counter sleeping aids -- in operator Terrese Edmonds' urine.
NEWS
May 17, 2009 | Robert Mitchum
Emmanuel Michael used to think that his unusual sleep patterns were nothing more than amusing quirks. In college, he once woke up from a library snooze to find a note on his chest complaining about his loud snoring. After he became a database programmer, Michael would eat lunch quickly so he could also take a half-hour nap during his break. But when he read online about sleep disorders recently, Michael discovered that his snoring and daytime drowsiness might be a sign of sleep apnea -- a disorder that interrupts a sleeping person's breathing, sometimes dozens of times a night -- and that his health might be at risk.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2008 | Rajesh Mahapatra, The Associated Press
The call center job came with a good salary and good perks, especially compared to many other opportunities for young people in India. But as 26-year-old Vaibhav Vats says, it was doing him no good. His weight grew to 265 pounds and long overnight hours gave him little time for a social life. Eventually, he quit. "You are making nice money. But the trade-off is also big," said Vats, who spent nearly two years at an IBM Corp. call center handling customer calls from the United States.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2002 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drug implicated in date rapes and nightclub deaths won federal approval Wednesday for treating a rare type of sleeping disorder, under special restrictions aimed at stopping its diversion to nonmedical uses. GHB, or gamma hydroxybutyrate, has an unusual four-decade history of use as an anesthetic, a body-building supplement and a party drug popular on the rave scene.
SPORTS
August 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sweat streamed down Hal Sutton's face and stained his shirt Monday as he pounded balls on the practice range, trying to shake the rust from a game that has been relatively dormant the past month. This is not the time to be catching up. The PGA Championship starts Thursday, the final major of the year. Of greater interest to the 43-year-old Sutton is finding his form in time for the Ryder Cup next month. "Every morning I wake up, I feel like I've just run a marathon," he said.
HEALTH
February 5, 2001 | Benedict Carey
Sleepfoundation.org Background: This is the Internet face of the National Sleep Foundation, a nonprofit organization devoted to publicizing sleep disorders and supporting sleep research and education. The site provides general consumer information, as well as updates on what the foundation is doing. What Works: The site's quick explainers of major sleep disorders, and the group's own survey results on sleep habits, make for a clear snapshot of how sleep problems affect public health.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
German A. Nino-Murcia, 45, internationally recognized specialist on sleep disorders. Born in Ubate, Colombia, Nino-Murcia was educated at the National University of Colombia School of Medicine and completed residencies at the Philadelphia Psychiatric Center and at Thomas Jefferson University in Pennsylvania. He directed Stanford's Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Center from 1983 to 1989, educating thousands of doctors on such sleep problems as insomnia and apnea syndrome.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There may be a lot of sleepy police officers out there, a study finds, with about 40% of them having at least one sleep disorder. A study released today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. looked at sleep disorders and how they affected the health and safety of 4,957 police officers in the U.S. and Canada. Among the officers 40.4% were found to have at least one sleep disorder, and 33.6% had obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which a blocked or narrowed airway causes breathing to stop and start during sleep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998 | YUNG KIM
When Cathy Hopkins woke up in the morning, the only thing she thought about was going back to sleep. No matter how many hours she slept, the self-described "world-class snorer" spent her days awake without energy and in a listless haze, concentrating on putting one foot in front of the other. Because she worked 50 to 60 hours a week as a nurse, Hopkins said she assumed her condition was the result of normal fatigue. That was until she went on a vacation with a friend last fall.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | Associated Press
Sen. Max Cleland, who has been seen nodding off during committee hearings and news conferences, said he is suffering from a sleep disorder. Cleland, a Democrat, has been diagnosed with sleep apnea, a condition that interrupts proper breathing during sleep, causing him to sleep poorly at night and become fatigued during the day, he told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "It's basically sleep deprivation," said Dr. John DelGaudio, an ear, nose and throat specialist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta.
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