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Sleeping Sickness

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1991 | HARRY NELSON, Nelson is a retired Times medical writer living in Woodland Hills
A new outbreak of African sleeping sickness in Uganda is providing scientists with a unique opportunity to study the strange parasite responsible for the affliction. African sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease inflicted on its victims through the bite of the tsetse fly. Untreated, its early symptoms of fever and fatigue give way to apathy, convulsions, coma and inevitably death.
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HEALTH
June 28, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Researchers are gearing up for a clinical trial of what they hope will be the first inexpensive, oral drug to treat trypanosomiasis, commonly known as sleeping sickness. Current drugs used for the disease require sophisticated diagnosis and drug infusions that are not typically available in the African regions most affected by trypanosomiasis, and the drugs themselves are frequently lethal. The new experimental drug, called SCYX-7158, is a compound containing the element boron that was developed by a Palo Alto company.
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NEWS
July 22, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In Lucas Oyango's village, they needed to refer only to "the disease." For sleeping sickness was familiar to almost every family. Periodically, it turned the villagers into nomads, forcing them across the border into Tanzania. "They were driven away because of the flies," Oyango said. Years later, one family returned with 10 head of cattle to hitch to their two plows. Before the crops could even be planted, the disease had killed all the animals.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | HEMA SHUKLA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Busloads of raucous villagers pour in to gawk at the tigers pacing in their enclosures. Some throw paper balls at them. Others shout friendly insults. It's business as usual at the Nandankanan Zoological Park, home to India's largest collection of rare animals. But all isn't as it should be. The park drew world attention in July after 12 Royal Bengal tigers died, eight of them within a few hours of each other. A 13th died a few weeks later.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | From Reuters
About 250 people have been stricken with sleeping sickness in the Kamuri district of eastern Uganda and nine have died, the government-run newspaper New Vision said Friday. The outbreak is due to an infestation of tsetse flies in the area over the last six months and the number of victims is expected to grow, the biweekly paper said.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
If you want to cut the risk of corneal damage by up to 74%, remove your contact lenses before going to sleep. Johns Hopkins University researcher Oliver Schein says sleeping with contact lenses is the leading culprit for ulcerative keratitis, a condition caused by an infection with bacteria or other germs. It produces a destructive inflammation of the cornea.
HEALTH
June 28, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Researchers are gearing up for a clinical trial of what they hope will be the first inexpensive, oral drug to treat trypanosomiasis, commonly known as sleeping sickness. Current drugs used for the disease require sophisticated diagnosis and drug infusions that are not typically available in the African regions most affected by trypanosomiasis, and the drugs themselves are frequently lethal. The new experimental drug, called SCYX-7158, is a compound containing the element boron that was developed by a Palo Alto company.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | HEMA SHUKLA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Busloads of raucous villagers pour in to gawk at the tigers pacing in their enclosures. Some throw paper balls at them. Others shout friendly insults. It's business as usual at the Nandankanan Zoological Park, home to India's largest collection of rare animals. But all isn't as it should be. The park drew world attention in July after 12 Royal Bengal tigers died, eight of them within a few hours of each other. A 13th died a few weeks later.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Swiss drug giant Novartis said it would slash the price of a new malaria drug for Africa, while the French-German firm Aventis Pharma pledged help in the battle against sleeping sickness. The World Health Organization welcomed the offers, which come as drug makers face pressure to cut the price of AIDS drugs for poor nations. Aventis Pharma said it was giving WHO $25 million over five years to fight sleeping sickness in Africa.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Twelve Royal Bengal tigers died in an Indian zoo after eating contaminated meat, a laboratory official said. Originally, authorities at the Nandankanan Zoo in Bhubaneshwar, the capital of Orissa state, said the tigers died this month of sleeping sickness, a disease carried by tsetse flies. But tests by Calcutta's Pathological Laboratory, run by the federal government, established that the deaths were caused by the consumption of decomposed and contaminated cow meat, an official at the lab said.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
If you want to cut the risk of corneal damage by up to 74%, remove your contact lenses before going to sleep. Johns Hopkins University researcher Oliver Schein says sleeping with contact lenses is the leading culprit for ulcerative keratitis, a condition caused by an infection with bacteria or other germs. It produces a destructive inflammation of the cornea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1991 | HARRY NELSON, Nelson is a retired Times medical writer living in Woodland Hills
A new outbreak of African sleeping sickness in Uganda is providing scientists with a unique opportunity to study the strange parasite responsible for the affliction. African sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease inflicted on its victims through the bite of the tsetse fly. Untreated, its early symptoms of fever and fatigue give way to apathy, convulsions, coma and inevitably death.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In Lucas Oyango's village, they needed to refer only to "the disease." For sleeping sickness was familiar to almost every family. Periodically, it turned the villagers into nomads, forcing them across the border into Tanzania. "They were driven away because of the flies," Oyango said. Years later, one family returned with 10 head of cattle to hitch to their two plows. Before the crops could even be planted, the disease had killed all the animals.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | From Reuters
About 250 people have been stricken with sleeping sickness in the Kamuri district of eastern Uganda and nine have died, the government-run newspaper New Vision said Friday. The outbreak is due to an infestation of tsetse flies in the area over the last six months and the number of victims is expected to grow, the biweekly paper said.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Limping and gasping, 10 royal Bengal tigers--including seven rare white tigers--have died at an Indian zoo despite being injected with antibiotics, officials said. Some tigers lay dead in their concrete enclosures at the Nandankanan Zoo, which holds India's largest collection of royal Bengal tigers and the world's largest collection of white tigers. Veterinarians found that the animals had contracted sleeping sickness, or trypanosomiasis, an illness spread by tsetse flies, said S.K.
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