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Sleepless In Seattle Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of struggle and frustration, Jeff Arch is finally a Hollywood player. His first produced screenplay, the quirky "Sleepless in Seattle," is turning out to be the "sleeper" of the summer, grossing an impressive $17 million its opening weekend. Arch is currently writing other screenplays for directors Penny Marshall, Barry Levinson and Ron Howard and, at last count, working on three other projects.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1993 | DANA PARSONS
Like most men interested in where the women's movement is at any given point in time, I'm always on the lookout for clues. "Sleepless in Seattle," with its big box-office suggesting that it's hit a national nerve, must be offering clues. The buzz is that women love the movie, so it behooves us men to pay exceedingly particular attention to its message.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arriving in theaters with substantially less fanfare than the anticipated summer blockbuster films, the little romantic comedy "Sleepless in Seattle" zoomed to an estimated $17-million box-office gross in its opening weekend--a total that surprised the film industry and surpassed the $15.3-million opening recorded for the big-budgeted, fantasy-adventure extravaganza "Last Action Hero" a week ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of struggle and frustration, Jeff Arch is finally a Hollywood player. His first produced screenplay, the quirky "Sleepless in Seattle," is turning out to be the "sleeper" of the summer, grossing an impressive $17 million its opening weekend. Arch is currently writing other screenplays for directors Penny Marshall, Barry Levinson and Ron Howard and, at last count, working on three other projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1993 | DANA PARSONS
Like most men interested in where the women's movement is at any given point in time, I'm always on the lookout for clues. "Sleepless in Seattle," with its big box-office suggesting that it's hit a national nerve, must be offering clues. The buzz is that women love the movie, so it behooves us men to pay exceedingly particular attention to its message.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charlie Lang (Nicolas Cage) is a New York cop with an overdose of decency. He's sweet and affable and he believes in keeping his word--he's like Forrest Gump with an elevated IQ. When Charlie finds himself in a diner short of a tip, he makes a pie-in-the-sky promise to his waitress (Bridget Fonda) to give her half of any possible winnings on his just-purchased lottery ticket.
NEWS
October 3, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Autry, the singing cowboy superstar of the silver screen, media entrepreneur and original owner of the Anaheim Angels, died Friday. He was 91. Autry, who also founded the 10-year-old Autry Museum of Western Heritage, died at his home in Studio City after a long illness, according to Karla Buhlman, vice president of Gene Autry Entertainment. His death came three days after his 91st birthday and three months after that of his celluloid rival and friend Roy Rogers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arriving in theaters with substantially less fanfare than the anticipated summer blockbuster films, the little romantic comedy "Sleepless in Seattle" zoomed to an estimated $17-million box-office gross in its opening weekend--a total that surprised the film industry and surpassed the $15.3-million opening recorded for the big-budgeted, fantasy-adventure extravaganza "Last Action Hero" a week ago.
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