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Sleepwalking

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NEWS
May 24, 1987 | MALCOLM RITTER, Associated Press
It is an amazing story: An 11-year-old boy is found walking at night nearly 100 miles from his Illinois home and says he has no idea that he had apparently hopped a freight train in his sleep. The boy had a history of sleepwalking, his mother told reporters. Most sleep disorder experts said in later interviews that the freight train trip could be another episode, although an unusually long-lasting and intricate one.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The documentary "The Human Scale" explores and celebrates the successful pedestrianization of various cities around the globe, particularly those that have been modified under the visionary eye of Danish architect and urban planner Jan Gehl. However, writer-director Andreas M. Dalsgaard takes such a low-key approach to presenting the film's vital, potentially involving topic that viewers may find themselves more inspired to take a snooze than a stroll. Dalsgaard, who also provides the movie's quiet, clipped-voiced narration, travels to such far-flung spots as Chongqing, China; Siena, Italy; Melbourne, Australia; Christchurch, New Zealand; Dhaka, Bangladesh (the world's fastest-growing city)
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SPORTS
July 13, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
Next time you feel like skipping work or school or anything else, do what baseball players do. Don't just call in sick. Call in with a really scary story: "I won't be in today." "Why not?" "Spiders." Or: "I won't be in today." "Why not?" "Sleepwalking." Or: "I won't be in today." "Why not?" "Vertigo." Each of those excuses is one actually used by major league ballplayers during the last calendar year to get out of playing ball. OK, maybe "excuses" is unfair. "Explanations," let's say.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Ira Glass, host of the weekly public radio show "This American Life" for 17 years running, knows hard work. But even he wasn't prepared for the screaming match at the crescendo of production on his first film, the new comedy "Sleepwalk With Me. " "The whole thing was traumatic," said Glass, recounting the scramble to raise money, the rushed five-week shoot in New York, the withering criticism from test audiences and the fight with director and...
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | From Reuters
A man acquitted of killing his mother-in-law after he said he was sleepwalking was acquitted Thursday of trying to murder his father-in-law in the same incident. An Ontario Supreme Court judge said the onus was on the Crown to prove that Kenneth Parks, 24, was conscious when he allegedly choked and stabbed Denis Woods in May, 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1988 | DON WALLER
On paper, the prospect of former Mott the Hoople frontman Ian Hunter recombining with erstwhile partner and ex-Bowie axeman Mick Ronson for a tour that would re-cement their reputations for being among the best 'n' brightest stars of the '70s sounded like an excellent idea, particularly in light of the local glam-rock revival. On Friday at the Palace, however, the Hunter/Ronson Band's nearly two-hour performance was perfunctory, poorly paced and ultimately disappointing.
SPORTS
December 30, 2006 | Helene Elliott
Darren Collison called UCLA's struggle against Washington State in its Pacific 10 Conference opener on Thursday "definitely a wake-up call." The sophomore guard added, "We thought we were ready. Washington State was our first game, and coach always told us Washington State was going to be our first good test. It woke us up." Apparently, their struggles against Oakland and Sam Houston State weren't alarming enough to awaken them to the need for consistency.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The last of the fall season's newcomers is a series you dare not sleep through. It's NBC's "Sleepwalkers," a promisingly dark, foreboding hour about complex, perilous nightmare probes by a team of scientists at the Morpheus Institute, a cutting-edge research facility named after the god of dreams in Greek mythology. Nathan Bradford (Bruce Greenwood) is the institute's founder and head man.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man who claimed he was sleepwalking when he stabbed his wife 44 times and held her head under water was convicted Friday of first-degree murder. Scott Falater, 43, stared straight ahead and did not react as the verdict was read in a Maricopa County Superior Court. He then hugged his stepfather and kissed his mother on the cheek. "It's not over yet," Falater said just before he left the courtroom.
OPINION
January 29, 1989 | ALLEN B. HAZELWOOD, Allen B. Hazelwood served for 21 years with the Marine Corps and Army Special Forces, including seven years as an adviser in El Salvador. Retired, he is a consultant with the National Defense Council Foundation
By any political-military calculation, domestic and international events now favor the communist guerrillas in El Salvador. Many indicators point to a coming major offensive by the Farabundo Marti Liberation Front (FMLN).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Comic Mike Birbiglia's very funny one-man show about love, life on the stand-up circuit, sleepwalking and the perils of all three was a near-perfectly calibrated piece of theater that became an off-Broadway hit a few years ago. The comic's conversational storytelling made all the players and their problems seem very real. The staging was unexpected, the timing exceptional. Having seen the show on stage, I wondered if Birbiglia could morph the ideas into an equally funny movie. He hasn't quite, but he's come pretty close.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Ever sleep-walked? I have. At the age of 12, I woke up to find myself in a bedroom where a visiting kid was staying over, my head gently resting on the foot of the bed. I got up, snuck back to my bedroom and kept it to myself. It was weird and a little embarrassing. On other occasions as a child, I woke -- well, half-woke -- in the wee hours and stumbled about the house talking to myself, waking everybody up and just generally causing a ruckus, not fully conscious. It was all to do with a recurrent nightmare involving frighteningly huge numbers, and I am not sure whether to blame the “Million Book” filled with 1 million Xs in my grade school classroom or having two math-loving brothers and a mathematician dad. I'm far from alone, it appears.
HEALTH
March 30, 2009 | Denise Gellene
Lost jobs and lost careers. Promising businesses in shambles. The college acceptance letter returned to its envelope. This is how President Obama recently described the effect of the tanking economy on ordinary Americans -- and the stresses keeping them up at night. Sleeplessness is a problem even in good times. One in 10 U.S. adults routinely has trouble getting to sleep or staying asleep, and 3 in 10 experience occasional sleeplessness, federal statistics show.
SPORTS
August 25, 2008 | Mark Heisler, Times Staff Writer
BEIJING -- At long last, Dream Team II. There was a time when people thought the Dream Team's successors would all get their own roman numerals, like Super Bowls, but that ended soon afterward, followed by the myth of the U.S. pros' invulnerability, until Sunday. These Americans, who had beaten opponents by 32 points a game -- and this opponent by 37 -- found themselves in an actual contest but won it by outlasting Spain, 118-107, to take home their first gold medal since Sydney in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Movie Critic
The road to romantic recovery is meandering, far-flung and thousands of miles long in "My Blueberry Nights," Wong Kar Wai's first English-language film. Norah Jones, in her bland screen debut, plays a brokenhearted New Yorker named Elizabeth who sets out on a road trip across America after a bad breakup, presumably in search of oblivion or at the very least a change of scenery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
The melodrama of a broken family haunted by its past, a perennial favorite of independent filmmakers, gets a forceful but ultimately flawed workout in "Sleepwalking." Terrific performances and a bleak, riveting look at life on the economic fringes eventually gives way to an overly familiar tale of abuse, denial and catharsis that feels like warmed over Sam Shepard minus the poetry.
NEWS
January 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
A man who contended that he was sleepwalking when he killed his wife by stabbing her 44 times and holding her head under water was sentenced Monday to life in prison without any possibility of parole. Scott Falater, who never denied that he killed Yarmila Falater, was convicted of first-degree murder on June 25. Jurors said Falater's claim of sleepwalking was hard to believe. Falater, 43, showed no emotion when Superior Court Judge Ronald Reinstein sentenced him.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Ever sleep-walked? I have. At the age of 12, I woke up to find myself in a bedroom where a visiting kid was staying over, my head gently resting on the foot of the bed. I got up, snuck back to my bedroom and kept it to myself. It was weird and a little embarrassing. On other occasions as a child, I woke -- well, half-woke -- in the wee hours and stumbled about the house talking to myself, waking everybody up and just generally causing a ruckus, not fully conscious. It was all to do with a recurrent nightmare involving frighteningly huge numbers, and I am not sure whether to blame the “Million Book” filled with 1 million Xs in my grade school classroom or having two math-loving brothers and a mathematician dad. I'm far from alone, it appears.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | Allyssa Lee, Special to The Times
AT first glance, Nick Stahl's James Reedy -- an aimless 30-year-old who serves as the central character of William Maher's "Sleepwalking," out in limited release Friday -- doesn't seem to do much of anything. He lives in a bleak industrial Northern California town, toils at a menial job and keeps his words to a minimum. But Stahl says there's more to James than meets the eye.
SPORTS
February 11, 2008 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
SEATTLE -- Washington played Sunday with the pent-up energy of housebound schoolchildren let loose and handed a basketball. Sometimes the Huskies got layups. Sometimes they got rebounds. Sometimes the missed shots caromed off the backboard. Once, in the final minute, Washington's Tim Morris inbounded the ball off UCLA forward Alfred Aboya's face. Every time it was a Husky diving for a loose ball and a Bruin standing still. The on-court pandemonium perplexed UCLA, and with things not going according to plan, the No. 5-ranked Bruins were upset, 71-61, by Washington, the ninth-place team in the Pacific 10 Conference.
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