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SCIENCE
March 31, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Bariatric surgery did more to improve symptoms of diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol after three years than intensive treatment with drugs alone, according to new results from a closely watched clinical trial involving patients who were overweight or obese. Study participants who had gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy also lost more weight, had better kidney function and saw greater improvements in their quality of life than their counterparts who did not go under the knife, researchers reported Monday.
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SCIENCE
March 31, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Bariatric surgery did more to improve symptoms of diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol after three years than intensive treatment with drugs alone, according to new results from a closely watched clinical trial involving patients who were overweight or obese. Study participants who had gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy also lost more weight, had better kidney function and saw greater improvements in their quality of life than their counterparts who did not go under the knife, researchers reported Monday.
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SCIENCE
March 28, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Scientists and physicians who study the treatment of obesity have been puzzled for some years over bariatric surgery and its benefits.”Stomach stapling” surgery was long seen as a “plumbing adjustment” that prompts weight loss by restricting the stomach's capacity. But mounting evidence demonstrates that it does much more than that. Bariatric surgery appears to set in motion a host of physiological and psychological changes beyond weight loss, in many cases resolving type 2 diabetes, righting problematic cholesterol readings, and not just curbing, but changing, appetites.
SCIENCE
March 28, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Scientists and physicians who study the treatment of obesity have been puzzled for some years over bariatric surgery and its benefits.”Stomach stapling” surgery was long seen as a “plumbing adjustment” that prompts weight loss by restricting the stomach's capacity. But mounting evidence demonstrates that it does much more than that. Bariatric surgery appears to set in motion a host of physiological and psychological changes beyond weight loss, in many cases resolving type 2 diabetes, righting problematic cholesterol readings, and not just curbing, but changing, appetites.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Having surgery to lose weight is a big step, with a big price tag, medical risks, and a potentially dramatic change in lifestyle. But it's showing signs of becoming an increasingly effective means not only of achieving substantial weight loss, but of improving metabolic problems and, over several years, driving down heart attack and stroke risk. But there's a bewildering range of weight-loss surgery procedures, and as they become more common, research is showing they have different surgical risks and rates of complications.
HEALTH
March 26, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In findings that promise radical changes in the care of the 20 million U.S. patients with Type 2 diabetes, two new clinical trials have shown that weight-loss surgery brings about dramatically greater improvement of blood sugar control in obese diabetics than standard diabetes care. In both studies, even rigorously supervised regimens of diet, exercise and medications failed to bring blood sugar under good control after a year or more. In contrast, two teams of researchers - one in Italy, the other in the United States - reported that surgical procedures to reduce the size and sometimes the placement of the stomach often allowed subjects to discontinue diabetes medications within weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla
Comedian Lisa Lampanelli has lost 106 pounds - and no, she didn't get rid of a skinny best friend. Lampanelli had gastric-sleeve surgery a year ago in April and has since shed all that weight off her formerly 248-pound frame. (See the before and after in the video above.) “I feel like I've reached the weight I'm supposed to be," she told InTouch on Thursday. "I'm officially a skinny ... " -- um, let's say a skinny best friend. In gastric sleeve surgery, or sleeve gastrectomy, the left side of the stomach is removed, according to the Mayo Clinic , leaving a stomach "about the size and shape of a banana.
HEALTH
February 22, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Less than a week after the Food and Drug Administration approved the marketing of Lap-Band weight-loss surgery to 11 million new patients, a pair of studies has found that a different, older procedure is more effective and no riskier than either the Lap-Band or another less-drastic surgery, sleeve gastrectomy. In the first head-to-head comparison of weight-loss surgeries widely used in the United States, UC San Francisco researchers found that those who had their stomach capacity reduced by a Roux-en-Y bypass, which reduces the stomach's capacity and bypasses a part of the intestine, lost more weight, required less diabetes medication and were less likely to need further surgery than those who received the Lap-Band.
SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
An estimated 220,000 Americans undergo some type of bariatric surgery each year, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has revealed that he is one of them. The high-profile Republican - who hasn't revealed his weight but is estimated to tip the scales at between 300 and 350 pounds - said he went under the knife for a 40-minute lap band procedure on a Saturday morning in February. In less than three months, he has lost about 40 pounds, according to sources cited in various reports . A lap band procedure involves fitting an inflatable silicone ring around the stomach to reduce food intake.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
While diet and exercise are available to all, bariatric surgery is likely to remain a solution available to just a small fraction of the 90 million Americans who are obese. But when it comes to inducing weight loss and improving obesity-related health conditions, a new study has found that there really is no contest between the two: Procedures such as gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding beat diet and exercise. By a long shot. A new study published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal finds that among subjects followed for at least six months and as long as two years, those who got weight-loss surgery lost on average 57 more pounds than those in nonsurgical weight programs.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Having surgery to lose weight is a big step, with a big price tag, medical risks, and a potentially dramatic change in lifestyle. But it's showing signs of becoming an increasingly effective means not only of achieving substantial weight loss, but of improving metabolic problems and, over several years, driving down heart attack and stroke risk. But there's a bewildering range of weight-loss surgery procedures, and as they become more common, research is showing they have different surgical risks and rates of complications.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla
Comedian Lisa Lampanelli has lost 106 pounds - and no, she didn't get rid of a skinny best friend. Lampanelli had gastric-sleeve surgery a year ago in April and has since shed all that weight off her formerly 248-pound frame. (See the before and after in the video above.) “I feel like I've reached the weight I'm supposed to be," she told InTouch on Thursday. "I'm officially a skinny ... " -- um, let's say a skinny best friend. In gastric sleeve surgery, or sleeve gastrectomy, the left side of the stomach is removed, according to the Mayo Clinic , leaving a stomach "about the size and shape of a banana.
SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
An estimated 220,000 Americans undergo some type of bariatric surgery each year, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has revealed that he is one of them. The high-profile Republican - who hasn't revealed his weight but is estimated to tip the scales at between 300 and 350 pounds - said he went under the knife for a 40-minute lap band procedure on a Saturday morning in February. In less than three months, he has lost about 40 pounds, according to sources cited in various reports . A lap band procedure involves fitting an inflatable silicone ring around the stomach to reduce food intake.
HEALTH
March 26, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In findings that promise radical changes in the care of the 20 million U.S. patients with Type 2 diabetes, two new clinical trials have shown that weight-loss surgery brings about dramatically greater improvement of blood sugar control in obese diabetics than standard diabetes care. In both studies, even rigorously supervised regimens of diet, exercise and medications failed to bring blood sugar under good control after a year or more. In contrast, two teams of researchers - one in Italy, the other in the United States - reported that surgical procedures to reduce the size and sometimes the placement of the stomach often allowed subjects to discontinue diabetes medications within weeks.
HEALTH
February 22, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Less than a week after the Food and Drug Administration approved the marketing of Lap-Band weight-loss surgery to 11 million new patients, a pair of studies has found that a different, older procedure is more effective and no riskier than either the Lap-Band or another less-drastic surgery, sleeve gastrectomy. In the first head-to-head comparison of weight-loss surgeries widely used in the United States, UC San Francisco researchers found that those who had their stomach capacity reduced by a Roux-en-Y bypass, which reduces the stomach's capacity and bypasses a part of the intestine, lost more weight, required less diabetes medication and were less likely to need further surgery than those who received the Lap-Band.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
On Monday, researchers reported in two new clinical trials that several types of weight-loss surgery were more effective at controlling blood-sugar levels in obese people with diabetes than the usual care regimen of diet and drugs. In many cases, as Los Angeles Times reporter Melissa Healy wrote Monday (see related items link), surgical procedures to reduce the size and sometimes the placement of the stomach often allowed subjects to discontinue diabetes medications within weeks.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Researchers have further unraveled how a version of a gene linked to obesity risk causes people to gain weight - it makes them more likely to feel hungry after a meal and to prefer high-calorie foods. Their study, published Monday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that individuals who inherited the high-risk version of the FTO gene from both of their parents have higher levels of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin in their bloodstream, which leaves them hungry even after eating.
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