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Slick Rick

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November 5, 2003 | From staff and wire reports
Rapper Slick Rick, imprisoned in Florida for 17 months as the Immigration and Naturalization Service sought to deport him to his native England, apparently will be released soon, his representatives say. A ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Kimba M. Wood overturned the deportation decision regarding the singer, whose real name is Ricky Walters, and reinstated a 1995 waiver of the law that requires aliens who commit felonies in America to be sent home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Rock the Bells added a batch of additional performers to its 2013 lineup from younger voices J. Cole , Pusha T and Action Bronson to veteran hip-hop statesmen KRS One and Slick Rick. The additions, which were announced Monday night, included more than a dozen acts across the traveling hip-hop festival's four stops . Big Daddy Kane, Deltron 3030, Freeway, Girl Talk, Rapsody and 9th Wonder, Wale, YG, Riff Raff and Doug E. Fresh were also added to the bill. TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts For its 10th anniversary, the festival, which kicks off in San Bernardino on Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Rock the Bells added a batch of additional performers to its 2013 lineup from younger voices J. Cole , Pusha T and Action Bronson to veteran hip-hop statesmen KRS One and Slick Rick. The additions, which were announced Monday night, included more than a dozen acts across the traveling hip-hop festival's four stops . Big Daddy Kane, Deltron 3030, Freeway, Girl Talk, Rapsody and 9th Wonder, Wale, YG, Riff Raff and Doug E. Fresh were also added to the bill. TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts For its 10th anniversary, the festival, which kicks off in San Bernardino on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Rock the Bells is beefing up the Southern California stop of the annual traveling hip-hop festival by adding a third stage. Chang Weisburg of Guerilla Union, promoters of the annual hip-hop festival, announced Thursday on Big Boy's morning radio show on Power 106 that they planned to tap at least an additional 10 acts --  bringing more than 50 hip-hop acts to San Bernardino's NOS Events Center on Aug. 18-19. Weisburg confirmed that they had already added Killer Mike, EL-P, Xzibit, KRS-One and Slim the Mobster, with more acts expected to be announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Dean Kuipers, Special to The Times
Slick Rick's recent stint in jail battling a deportation order may be better known than his latest album, but the veteran rapper's set Wednesday at the Key Club -- his first show since his release in November -- proved there was good artistic reason so many stars, including Chris Rock and Will Smith, had spoken out for release of the England-born, Bronx-bred performer. His deft old-school style was pure entertainment that traded only partly on nostalgia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1998 | SOREN BAKER
The idea of filling a hip-hop bill with several unknown acts, a famous headliner and legendary hosts seems ill-fated. After all, most rap fans attend concerts to hear today's stars perform today's hits. But for the capacity audience Thursday evening at the House of Blues stop of the Lyricist Lounge tour, witnessing tomorrow's rhyme heroes proved well worth the price of admission. Nonetheless, headliner Slick Rick was the highlight of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Slick Rick doesn't look like most rappers. He's toothpick-thin, with a black patch over his right eye--sightless since it was struck by shattered glass when he was 18 months old. His smile sparkles with gold teeth decorated with diamonds. Rick's accent is a startling mixture of Bronx and British, a result of growing up in England and moving to the Bronx when he was 12. Otherwise, Slick Rick's traits--the swagger, the rebelliousness, the swearing--are normal for rappers. At a hamburger joint in West Hollywood on a recent afternoon, he was explaining how good he is--also typical for a rapper.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2004 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
There is little that boosts a hard-core rapper's credibility more than jail time. But influential rap veteran Slick Rick, whose 18-month detention by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and successful fight against deportation became a celebrated case in the rap world, is just trying to put that all behind him as he makes his new album.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | SOREN BAKER, Soren Baker writes about hip-hop for Calendar
When Slick Rick's fourth album, "The Art of Storytelling," hits record stores Tuesday, it will mark the triumphant return of rap's premier yarn-spinner. Since debuting with Doug E. Fresh on the classic plot-driven songs "The Show" and "La Di Da Di" in 1985, the London-born rapper has drawn a loyal audience with his distinctive British accent, extensive vocabulary and vivid imagery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2002 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1996, after five years in prison, rapper Slick Rick was desperate to make new music, return to his beloved Bronx streets and dote on his two children. Now, though, the same crime that put him in prison has landed him behind bars again, and may lead to the British citizen's deportation from the country he has called home since 1976. "It was devastating," the rapper said Friday in a phone interview from an immigration detention facility in Manatee County, Fla.
SPORTS
September 25, 2009 | BILL PLASCHKE
He said he wanted to take UCLA football to a higher level. He never said exactly how. So perhaps one should not be surprised when Coach Rick Neuheisel explained Thursday that he is doing it by . . . helicopter? "Yeah, helicopter," he said. "Pretty cool, huh?" Last Friday night, Neuheisel wanted to attend four inner-city high school football games while burnishing his growing street cred. So he traveled there by whirlybird, buzzing low above fields filled with wide-eyed kids before games at Compton, Crenshaw, Long Beach Poly and Carson.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
New York Gov. David Paterson is granting a full and unconditional pardon to rapper Ricky "Slick Rick" Walters for the attempted murders of two men in 1991. The pardon is expected to halt efforts to deport Walters to Britain, the country he left as a child. The eye-patch-wearing star behind the '80s rap classic "La-Di-Da-Di" served more than five years in prison after the shooting of his cousin and another man. Both survived. The governor said Walters is now a rap artist and landlord in the Bronx who has not had any criminal problems since his release from prison in 1997.
NEWS
December 21, 2006 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
ALL Slick Rick wants for Christmas is to be home with his family in New York. And next Christmas. And the next. And the next. It's a modest wish for a rapper, especially one known as a key figure in the '80s rise of glitzy hip-hop -- he of the spangled eye patch and the colorful, character-driven tales of such hits as the controversial "Treat Her Like a Prostitute" and his playful 1985 "La-Di-Da-Di" pairing with Doug E. Fresh, all cited as influences by figures including Eminem and Chris Rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2006 | Ben Quinones, Special to The Times
"I came out of jail and the place goes bananas," said Slick Rick, with a hint of a British accent as the celebrated U.K.-born, Bronx-raised rapper finished up his classic "Children's Story" on Thursday at the House of Blues in Anaheim. That's his rap about a kid who runs afoul with the law and leads the cops on a high-speed chase that ends in a car crash. In a twisted case of life imitating art, Rick was pursued by police after he tried to shoot his cousin in a 1990 "beef."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2004 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
There is little that boosts a hard-core rapper's credibility more than jail time. But influential rap veteran Slick Rick, whose 18-month detention by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and successful fight against deportation became a celebrated case in the rap world, is just trying to put that all behind him as he makes his new album.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Dean Kuipers, Special to The Times
Slick Rick's recent stint in jail battling a deportation order may be better known than his latest album, but the veteran rapper's set Wednesday at the Key Club -- his first show since his release in November -- proved there was good artistic reason so many stars, including Chris Rock and Will Smith, had spoken out for release of the England-born, Bronx-bred performer. His deft old-school style was pure entertainment that traded only partly on nostalgia.
NEWS
December 21, 2006 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
ALL Slick Rick wants for Christmas is to be home with his family in New York. And next Christmas. And the next. And the next. It's a modest wish for a rapper, especially one known as a key figure in the '80s rise of glitzy hip-hop -- he of the spangled eye patch and the colorful, character-driven tales of such hits as the controversial "Treat Her Like a Prostitute" and his playful 1985 "La-Di-Da-Di" pairing with Doug E. Fresh, all cited as influences by figures including Eminem and Chris Rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2006 | Ben Quinones, Special to The Times
"I came out of jail and the place goes bananas," said Slick Rick, with a hint of a British accent as the celebrated U.K.-born, Bronx-raised rapper finished up his classic "Children's Story" on Thursday at the House of Blues in Anaheim. That's his rap about a kid who runs afoul with the law and leads the cops on a high-speed chase that ends in a car crash. In a twisted case of life imitating art, Rick was pursued by police after he tried to shoot his cousin in a 1990 "beef."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2003 | From staff and wire reports
Rapper Slick Rick, imprisoned in Florida for 17 months as the Immigration and Naturalization Service sought to deport him to his native England, apparently will be released soon, his representatives say. A ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Kimba M. Wood overturned the deportation decision regarding the singer, whose real name is Ricky Walters, and reinstated a 1995 waiver of the law that requires aliens who commit felonies in America to be sent home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2002 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1996, after five years in prison, rapper Slick Rick was desperate to make new music, return to his beloved Bronx streets and dote on his two children. Now, though, the same crime that put him in prison has landed him behind bars again, and may lead to the British citizen's deportation from the country he has called home since 1976. "It was devastating," the rapper said Friday in a phone interview from an immigration detention facility in Manatee County, Fla.
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